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Computing & Control Engineering Journal

Issue 4 • Date Aug.-Sept. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • PRINCE2

    Page(s): 49
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • The IEE Control

    Page(s): 0_1
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  • MATLAB & SIMULINK

    Page(s): 0_2
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  • How2 to be the best you can be - Publication

    Page(s): 23
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  • My view: automation vendors seek pastures new

    Page(s): 8 - 9
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    Industrial automation is becoming an increasingly commoditised business. With the ever more widespread adoption of COTS (commercial off the shelf) hardware, software and communications technologies - Windows, Intel, and Ethernet to name but three - it's becoming harder than ever for automation vendors to differentiate themselves from their competitors, to identify areas where they can seek genuine competitive advantage and, most important, to make serious money. That's not to deny that opportunities still exist to innovate in the mainstream automation business, but the fact still remains that advances in technology tend to offer only marginal improvements in performance, both over a particular vendor's previous generation of equipment and over the current offerings of its competitors. Time was when factory and process automation vendors sold instruments and control systems. They still do, but an increasing proportion of their revenues are coming from outside their traditional areas of interest. View full abstract»

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  • Inside SysML

    Page(s): 10 - 15
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    In March 2003, the Object Management Group (OMG) issued a request for proposals for a customised version of UML suitable for systems engineering, supporting the modelling of a broad range of systems, which may include hardware, software, data, personnel, procedures, and facilities. There was only one technology submission to the request, which was by the SysML group, proposing a language based on UML 2.0. The goal of SysML is to provide a "standard modelling language for systems engineering to analyse, specify, design, and verify complex systems, intended to enhance systems quality, improve the ability to exchange systems engineering information amongst tools, and help bridge the semantic gap between systems, software, and other engineering disciplines". The SysML specification makes it possible to model both hardware and software in the same environment using extensions to the widely used software modelling language. View full abstract»

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  • Can software be patented?

    Page(s): 16 - 17
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    The European parliament's rejection of the software patents directive is welcome news to independent contractors. Its stated aims were to harmonise the patenting of hi-tech inventions across the EU and in so doing to define the boundary between software and inventions that happen to have a non-fundamental software element, leaving the former unpatentable. The context for the project involved a trend in the European Patent Office to categorise software as an invention and grant patents for it; software becoming openly patentable in the USA in the mid-90s; and the European Patent Convention and World Trade Organisation's Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights agreement explicitly stating that software, business methods and works of literature should be protected by copyright, not by patents. While they are certainly persuasive if not subjected to technical scrutiny, these arguments are clearly not all mutually compatible. There was much controversy over exactly what each version of the directive would do. Those in favour argued both that software patents were desirable and, somewhat confusingly, that they would not be introduced. View full abstract»

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  • New directions in control loop assessment and diagnosis

    Page(s): 18 - 22
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    Process control performance is a cornerstone of operational excellence in the refining, petrochemicals, pulp and paper and the mineral processing industry. Control performance assessment and monitoring applications have become mainstream in these industries and are changing the maintenance methodology surrounding control assets from predictive to condition based. There are many benefits from using controller performance assessment and monitoring, and more to come in the future as new methods for diagnosis and loop tuning advisors start to be included in the tools. The discussions at the IEE seminar on control loop assessment and diagnosis suggest it is a valuable technology in the process industries. View full abstract»

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  • How do you know which control loops are the most important?

    Page(s): 24 - 29
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    PID control loops are implemented to control a process variable (PV) to a setpoint (SP) by manipulation of an output (OP). The relationship between these variables should depend on the key role of the loop or a trade-off between the key roles. With hundreds of control loops active in typical process plants, it is essential for operators to know which ones are the most important and therefore the ones that should get the most attention. View full abstract»

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  • Challenges in the detection, diagnosis and visualisation of controller performance data

    Page(s): 30 - 34
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    Process control performance is a cornerstone of operational excellence in the refining, petrochemical, pulp and paper and the mineral processing industries. The large numbers of assets on these sites - compared to the diminishing number of maintenance and control personnel - has made monitoring and diagnosing control problems a serious challenge. Mainstream control performance assessment and monitoring applications are changing maintenance methodology from predictive to condition-based. The implementation of an advanced control strategy is not an end in itself. Continuous improvement in process performance is ensured by constantly monitoring and assessing the performance of the basic control loops. View full abstract»

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  • Tree mapping technology as a means of visualising control performance problems

    Page(s): 35 - 39
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    Tree maps were intended to be visualisation aids for representing complex organisation charts, biological species, and so on. The objective of an effective controller performance visualisation chart is to present the information on the performance of the entire plant at a macro level and yet have the ability to display local (micro) details at the unit level or even the loop level. From a visual point of view it is important to provide an indication of the number of control loops in each unit rather than simply displaying them as nodes of the same size. Identifying specific control issues on a plant-wide basis and their root-causes is analogous to looking for a needle in a haystack. A relatively new technology called tree mapping may be a useful solution to this problem; it eases the visualisation challenge associated with monitoring hundreds or thousands of control assets. View full abstract»

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  • Cluster trending analysis for control loop assessment and diagnosis

    Page(s): 40 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (963 KB)  

    Highly reliable automated systems require health monitoring capable of detecting any equipment faults as they occur and identifying the faulty components. Loop re-tuning can improve the performance when the operating environment has changed. However, if some equipment in the loop is malfunctioning, the simple control loop re-tuning will be less effective in improving the loop performance. Therefore, it is important to design a loop performance monitoring system with the capability of monitoring both the loop performance and the faults of equipment in-loop. This paper presents a new mechanism for control loop performance monitoring and equipment fault detection, based on cluster trending analysis. This mechanism is very sensitive to small signal variations and capable of detecting the abnormal signals embedded in the normal signals. View full abstract»

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  • New products

    Page(s): 47
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  • Calendar

    Page(s): 48
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Aims & Scope

Published from 2003-2007, Computing and Control Engineering was concerned with computing, communications, control and instrumentation.

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