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Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • A survey of 3D medical imaging technologies

    Page(s): 15 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (450 KB)  

    Three-dimensional medical imaging methodologies are surveyed with respect to hardware versus software, stand-alone versus on-the-scanner, speed, interaction, rendering methodology, fidelity, ease of use, cost, and quantitative capability. The question of volume versus surface rendering is considered in more detail. Research results are cited to illustrate the capabilities discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • A survey of architectures for volume rendering

    Page(s): 18 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (886 KB)  

    Five hardware architectures for volume rendering, which requires efficiently handling a huge amount of volumetric data, are surveyed, categorized, and compared. They are Cube, Insight, PARCUM, Voxel Processor, and 3DP. General-purpose graphics systems that exploit their surface-based geometry engine to reduce the computational burden of the rendering process are briefly reviewed.<> View full abstract»

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  • 3D image understanding in radiology

    Page(s): 24 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (682 KB)  

    The role of 3-D imaging in medicine and the questions it raises regarding what should be automated and how the information is to be used are addressed. The discussion then turns to imagery generated by equipment using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, or positron/single-photon emission tomograms (PET/SPECT). Such image data are considered as spatial image sequences. Low-level and high-level processing for spatial image sequence understanding are examined. Conclusions are drawn regarding the value of 3-D imaging and the issues to be considered in its future development.<> View full abstract»

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  • A simulation system for craniofacial surgeries based on 3D image processing

    Page(s): 29 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (527 KB)  

    A practical simulation system based on analysis of clinical surgical procedures is described. The system provides fundamental manipulation operations to simulate actual surgical activities. There is a simulated cutting operation for sectioning a bone into various arbitrary shapes, a movement operation to transport a bone block to a desired position, and a restricted-movement operation to move a bone block until it comes into contact with other bone. The system also generates a skin surface image of a postoperative patient based on a simulated plan of bone manipulation. An operational system to enable physicians handling the system to work at ease has been devised. The structure and function of the system are described, and examples of its use in simulation are given.<> View full abstract»

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  • Future trends in 3D medical imaging

    Page(s): 33 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1027 KB)  

    Areas where significant progress is needed are outlined. A unified conceptual framework based on generic tasks, showing the intricacies and the dependences that exist among completely distinct and intensive research lines, is defined. True 3-D volume imaging devices are then discussed, with the main emphasis on vascular network reconstruction. Segmentation issues are briefly reviewed. The fusion of information dealing with image, signal, and model is described. Simulation and planning problems are discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Engineering and the law-engineering obligations. III. Who is an independent contractor?

    Page(s): 48 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  

    For pt.II see ibid., vol.9, no.3 p.72 (1990). The following topics are discussed: implications of an employee's status; independent contractors; classifying employees View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

Full Aims & Scope