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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 24 of 24
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1 - c4
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  • IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publication information

    Page(s): c2
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  • Guest Editorial New Generation of Smart Wearable Health Systems and Applications

    Page(s): 293 - 294
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  • Electroactive polymer-based devices for e-textiles in biomedicine

    Page(s): 295 - 318
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    This paper describes the early conception and latest developments of electroactive polymer (EAP)-based sensors, actuators, electronic components, and power sources, implemented as wearable devices for smart electronic textiles (e-textiles). Such textiles, functioning as multifunctional wearable human interfaces, are today considered relevant promoters of progress and useful tools in several biomedical fields, such as biomonitoring, rehabilitation, and telemedicine. After a brief outline on ongoing research and the first products on e-textiles under commercial development, this paper presents the most highly performing EAP-based devices developed by our lab and other research groups for sensing, actuation, electronics, and energy generation/storage, with reference to their already demonstrated or potential applicability to electronic textiles View full abstract»

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  • Organic field effect transistors for textile applications

    Page(s): 319 - 324
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    In this paper, several issues concerning the development of textiles endowed with electronic functions will be discussed. In particular, issues concerning materials, structures, electronic models, and the mechanical constraints due to textile technologies will be detailed. The idea starts from an already developed organic field-effect transistor that is realized on a flexible film that can be applied, after the assembly, on whatever kind of substrate, in particular, on textiles. This could pave the way to a variety of applications aimed to conjugate the favorable mechanical properties of textiles with the electronic functions of transistors. Furthermore, a possible perspective for the developments of organic sensors based on this structure are described. View full abstract»

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  • Flexible technologies and smart clothing for citizen medicine, home healthcare, and disease prevention

    Page(s): 325 - 336
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    Improvement of the quality and efficiency of healthcare in medicine, both at home and in hospital, is becoming more and more important for patients and society at large. As many technologies (micro technologies, telecommunication, low-power design, new textiles, and flexible sensors) are now available, new user-friendly devices can be developed to enhance the comfort and security of the patient. As clothes and textiles are in direct contact with about 90% of the skin surface, smart sensors and smart clothes with noninvasive sensors are an attractive solution for home-based and ambulatory health monitoring. Moreover, wearable devices or smart homes with exosensors are also potential solutions. All these systems can provide a safe and comfortable environment for home healthcare, illness prevention, and citizen medicine. View full abstract»

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  • A wearable health care system based on knitted integrated sensors

    Page(s): 337 - 344
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    A comfortable health monitoring system named WEALTHY is presented. The system is based on a textile wearable interface implemented by integrating sensors, electrodes, and connections in fabric form, advanced signal processing techniques, and modern telecommunication systems. Sensors, electrodes and connections are realized with conductive and piezoresistive yarns. The sensorized knitted fabric is produced in a one step process. The purpose of this paper is to show the feasibility of a system based on fabric sensing elements. The capability of this system to acquire simultaneously several biomedical signals (i.e. electrocardiogram, respiration, activity) has been investigated and compared with a standard monitoring system. Furthermore, the paper presents two different methodologies for the acquisition of the respiratory signal with textile sensors. Results show that the information contained in the signals obtained by the integrated systems is comparable with that obtained by standard sensors. The proposed system is designed to monitor individuals affected by cardiovascular diseases, in particular during the rehabilitation phase. The system can also help professional workers who are subject to considerable physical and psychological stress and/or environmental and professional health risks. View full abstract»

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  • Performance evaluation of sensing fabrics for monitoring physiological and biomechanical variables

    Page(s): 345 - 352
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    In the last few years, the smart textile area has become increasingly widespread, leading to developments in new wearable sensing systems. Truly wearable instrumented garments capable of recording behavioral and vital signals are crucial for several fields of application. Here we report on results of a careful characterization of the performance of innovative fabric sensors and electrodes able to acquire vital biomechanical and physiological signals, respectively. The sensing function of the fabric sensors relies upon newly developed strain sensors, based on rubber-carbon-coated threads, and mainly depends on the weaving topology, and the composition and deposition process of the conducting rubber-carbon mixture. Fabric sensors are used to acquire the respitrace (RT) and movement sensors (MS). Sensing features of electrodes, instead rely upon metal-based conductive threads, which are instrumental in detecting bioelectrical signals, such as electrocardiogram (ECG) and electromyogram (EMG). Fabric sensors have been tested during some specific tasks of breathing and movement activity, and results have been compared with the responses of a commercial piezoelectric sensor and an electrogoniometer, respectively. The performance of fabric electrodes has been investigated and compared with standard clinical electrodes. View full abstract»

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  • The citizen health system (CHS): a Modular medical contact center providing quality telemedicine services

    Page(s): 353 - 362
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    In the context of the Citizen Health System (CHS) project, a modular Medical Contact Center (MCC) was developed, which can be used in the monitoring, treatment, and management of chronically ill patients at home, such as diabetic or congestive heart failure patients. The virtue of the CHS contact center is that, using any type of communication and telematics technology, it is able to provide timely and preventive prompting to the patients, thus, achieving better disease management. In this paper, we present the structure of the CHS system, describing the modules that enable its flexible and extensible architecture. It is shown, through specific examples, how quality of healthcare delivery can be increased by using such a system. View full abstract»

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  • A wearable point-of-care system for home use that incorporates plug-and-play and wireless standards

    Page(s): 363 - 371
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    A point-of-care system for continuous health monitoring should be wearable, easy to use, and affordable to promote patient independence and facilitate acceptance of new home healthcare technology. Reconfigurability, interoperability, and scalability are important. Standardization supports these requirements, and encourages an open market where lower product prices result from vendor competition. This paper first discusses candidate standards for wireless communication, plug-and-play device interoperability, and medical information exchange in point-of-care systems. It then addresses the design and implementation of a wearable, plug-and-play system for home care which adopts the IEEE 1073 Medical Information Bus (MIB) standards, and uses Bluetooth as the wireless communication protocol. This standards-based system maximizes user mobility by incorporating a three-level architecture populated by base stations, wearable data loggers, and wearable sensors. Design issues include the implementation of the MIB standards on microcontroller-driven embedded devices, low power consumption, wireless data exchange, and data storage and transmission in a reconfigurable body-area network. View full abstract»

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  • Strain sensing fabric for hand posture and gesture monitoring

    Page(s): 372 - 381
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    In this paper, we report on a new technology used to implement strain sensors to be integrated in usual garments. A particular conductive mixture based on commercial products is realized and directly spread over a piece of fabric, which shows, after the treatment, piezoresistive properties, i.e., a change in resistance when it is strained. This property is exploited to realize sensorized garments such as gloves, leotards, and seat covers capable of reconstructing and monitoring body shape, posture, and gesture. In general, this technology is a good candidate for adherent wearable systems with excellent mechanical coupling with body surface. Here, we mainly focused on a sensorized glove able to detect posture and movements of the fingers. It could be used in several fields of application. We report on experimental results of a sensorized glove used as movements recorder for rehabilitation therapies and medicine. Furthermore, we describe a dedicated methodology used to read the output sensors which allowed to avoid using metallic wires for the connections. The price to be paid for all these advantages is a nonlinear electric response of the fabric sensor and a too long settling time, that in principle, make these sensors not suitable for real-time applications. Here we propose a hardware and computational solution to overcome this limitation. View full abstract»

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  • A multiparameter wearable physiologic monitoring system for space and terrestrial applications

    Page(s): 382 - 391
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    A novel, unobtrusive and wearable, multiparameter ambulatory physiologic monitoring system for space and terrestrial applications, termed LifeGuard, is presented. The core element is a wearable monitor, the crew physiologic observation device (CPOD), that provides the capability to continuously record two standard electrocardiogram leads, respiration rate via impedance plethysmography, heart rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, ambient or body temperature, three axes of acceleration, and blood pressure. These parameters can be digitally recorded with high fidelity over a 9-h period with precise time stamps and user-defined event markers. Data can be continuously streamed to a base station using a built-in Bluetooth RF link or stored in 32 MB of on-board flash memory and downloaded to a personal computer using a serial port. The device is powered by two AAA batteries. The design, laboratory, and field testing of the wearable monitors are described. View full abstract»

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  • Exploring sitting posture and discomfort using nonlinear analysis methods

    Page(s): 392 - 401
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    The possibilities for describing sitting postural control using nonlinear methods was investigated during long-term driving. A total of 85 min of motorway driving intervals (n=12) were used for analysis. The results show that contrary to conventional analysis techniques, nonlinear measures were able to identify a threshold behavior describing the change in discomfort. Visual recurrence plots showed a clear change in the underlying dynamics after 1 hr of driving. The result was confirmed by the statistically significant differences in the stability and complexity of the COP time series, as explored using recurrence quantification analysis and spatio-temporal entropy. The findings of the experiment are consistent with the literature, and present a novel way to uncover transitions of discomfort stages in sitting behavioral research. View full abstract»

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  • Development of electronic textiles to support networks, communications, and medical applications in future U.S. Military protective clothing systems

    Page(s): 402 - 406
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    The focus of this paper is on the development of textile-based wearable electronics that can be integrated into military protective clothing. A materials and manufacturing survey was conducted to determine the best performing and most durable materials to withstand the rigors of textile manufacturing and potential military use. Narrow woven technology was selected as one of the most promising textile manufacturing methods. A working wearable narrow fabric version of the Universal Serial Bus (USB), as well as a radiating conductor, were successfully developed and fabricated. A circular knit T-shirt with an integrated spiral bus was also developed. Military products developed include components of a personal area network providing data and power transport, and a body-borne antenna integrated into a load-bearing vest. View full abstract»

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  • A new preprocessing approach for cell recognition

    Page(s): 407 - 412
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    In this paper, we describe a novel strategy for combining fisher's linear discriminant (FLD) preprocessing with a feedforward neural network to classify cultured cells in bright field images. This technique was applied to various experimental scenarios utilizing different imaging environments, and the results were compared with those for the traditional principal component analysis (PCA) preprocessing. Our FLD preprocessing was shown to be more effective than PCA due in large part to the fact that FLD maximizes the ratio of between-class to within-class scatter. The new cell recognition algorithm with FLD preprocessing improves accuracy while the speed is suitable for practical applications. View full abstract»

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  • Technical guidelines for enhancing privacy and data protection in modern electronic medical environments

    Page(s): 413 - 423
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    Raising awareness and providing guidance to on-line data protection is undoubtedly a crucial issue worldwide. Equally important is the issue of applying privacy-related legislation in a coherent and coordinated way. Both these topics gain extra attention when referring to medical environments and, thus, to the protection of patients' privacy and medical data. Electronic medical transactions require the transmission of personal and medical information over insecure communication channels like the Internet. It is, therefore, a rather straightforward task to capture the electronic medical behavior of a patient, thus constructing "patient profiles," or reveal sensitive information related to a patient's medical history. The consequence is clearly a potential violation of the patient's privacy. We performed a risk analysis study for a Greek shared care environment for the treatment of patients suffering from beta-thalassemia, an empirically embedded scenario that is representative of many other electronic medical environments; we capitalized on its results to provide an assessment of the associated risks, focusing on the description of countermeasures, in the form of technical guidelines that can be employed in such medical environments for protecting the privacy of personal and medical information. View full abstract»

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  • On the performance of telemedicine system using 17-GHz orthogonally polarized microwave links under the influence of heavy rainfall

    Page(s): 424 - 429
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    This paper describes the design of a telemedicine system based on next-generation wireless local area networks (WLANs) operating at 17 GHz. Seventeen gigahertz is proposed for next-generation WLAN services offering numerous advantages over traditional IEEE 802.11 networks that operate in the range of 2.4-5 GHz. Orthogonal polarization is often used to increase spectrum efficiency by utilizing signal paths of horizontal and vertical polarization. Radio waves exceeding 10 GHz are particularly vulnerable to signal degradation under the influence of rain which causes an effective reduction in isolation between polarized signal paths. This paper investigates the influence of heavy rain in a tropical region on wide-band microwave signals at 17 GHz using two links provided by a fixed broad-band wireless access system for two-way data exchange between paramedics attending an accident scene and the hospital via microwave equipment installed in the ambulance. We also study the effects of cross polarization and phase rotation due to persistent heavy rainfall in tropical regions. View full abstract»

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  • LV shape and motion: B-spline-based deformable model and sequential motion decomposition

    Page(s): 430 - 446
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    In this paper, we extend a previous work by J. Park and propose a uniform framework to reconstruct left ventricle (LV) geometry/motion from tagged MR images. In our work, the LV is modeled as a generalized prolate spheroid, and its motion is decomposed into four components-global translation, polar radial/z-axis compression, twisting, and bending. By formulating model parameters as tensor products of B-splines, we develop efficient algorithms to quickly reconstruct LV geometry/motion from extracted boundary contours and tracked planar tags. Experiments on both synthesized and in vivo data are also reported. View full abstract»

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  • Recording of time-varying back-pain data: a wireless solution

    Page(s): 447 - 458
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    Chronic back pain is a debilitating experience for a considerable proportion of the adult population, with a significant impact on countries' economies and health systems. While there has been increasing anecdotal evidence to support the fact that for certain categories of patients (such as wheelchair users), the back pain experienced is dynamically varying with time, there is a relative scarcity of data to support and document this observation, with consequential impact upon such patients' treatment and care. Part of the reason behind this state of affairs is the relative difficulty in gathering pain measurements at precisely defined moments in time. In this paper, we describe a wireless-enabled solution that collects both questionnaire and diagrammatic, visual-based data, via a pain drawing, which overcomes such limitations, enabling seamless data collection and its upload to a hospital server using existing wireless fidelity technology. Results show that it is generally perceived to be an easy-to-use and convenient solution to the challenges of anywhere/anytime data collection. View full abstract»

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  • MRI fuzzy segmentation of brain tissue using neighborhood attraction with neural-network optimization

    Page(s): 459 - 467
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    Image segmentation is an indispensable process in the visualization of human tissues, particularly during clinical analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images. Unfortunately, MR images always contain a significant amount of noise caused by operator performance, equipment, and the environment, which can lead to serious inaccuracies with segmentation. A robust segmentation technique based on an extension to the traditional fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm is proposed in this paper. A neighborhood attraction, which is dependent on the relative location and features of neighboring pixels, is shown to improve the segmentation performance dramatically. The degree of attraction is optimized by a neural-network model. Simulated and real brain MR images with different noise levels are segmented to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed technique compared to other FCM-based methods. This segmentation method is a key component of an MR image-based classification system for brain tumors, currently being developed. View full abstract»

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  • Artificial neural network medical decision support tool: predicting transfusion requirements of ER patients

    Page(s): 468 - 474
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    Blood product transfusion is a financial concern for hospitals and patients. Efficient utilization of this dwindling resource is a critical problem if hospitals are to maximize patient care while minimizing costs. Traditional statistical models do not perform well in this domain. An additional concern is the speed with which transfusion decisions and planning can be made. Rapid assessment in the emergency room (ER) necessarily limits the amount of usable information available (with respect to independent variables available). This study evaluates the efficacy of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to predict the transfusion requirements of trauma patients using readily available information. A total of 1016 patient records are used to train and test a backpropagation neural network for predicting the transfusion requirements of these patients during the first 2, 2-6, and 6-24 h, and for total transfusions. Sensitivity and specificity analysis are used along with the mean absolute difference between blood units predicted and units transfused to demonstrate that ANNs can accurately predict most ER patient transfusion requirements, while only using information available at the time of entry into the ER. View full abstract»

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  • Unsupervised segmentation based on robust estimation and color active contour models

    Page(s): 475 - 486
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    One of the most commonly used clinical tests performed today is the routine evaluation of peripheral blood smears. In this paper, we investigate the design, development, and implementation of a robust color gradient vector flow (GVF) active contour model for performing segmentation, using a database of 1791 imaged cells. The algorithms developed for this research operate in Luv color space, and introduce a color gradient and L2E robust estimation into the traditional GVF snake. The accuracy of the new model was compared with the segmentation results using a mean-shift approach, the traditional color GVF snake, and several other commonly used segmentation strategies. The unsupervised robust color snake with L2E robust estimation was shown to provide results which were superior to the other unsupervised approaches, and was comparable with supervised segmentation, as judged by a panel of human experts. View full abstract»

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  • 28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering Revolution in BioMedicine

    Page(s): 487 - 488
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  • IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine Information for authors

    Page(s): c3
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
427, Ho Sin Hang Engineering Building, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
ytzhang@ee.cuhk.edu.hk
Phone:+852 2609-8458
Fax:+852 2609-5558