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Pervasive Computing, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date July-Sept. 2005

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Metrics and Benchmarks for Pervasive Computing

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 4 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The time is ripe for defining metrics for various aspects of pervasive computing and for developing benchmarks that let us compare systems with respect to these metrics. View full abstract»

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  • Robotics research exploits opportunities for growth

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 7 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Japan, Korea, and the US are making promising new strides in robotics research. Japan's industrial giants have developed robots that monitor hospital patients, warn against intruders, and serve as companions for the elderly. Following the ancient Chinese phrase, "crisis equals opportunity," they're predicting that rising health care costs, labor shortages, and the aging population will create an enormous market for robots. Korea is also well-situated for growth in the robotics market. Perhaps in an attempt to leapfrog Japan, it has developed a wireless robot platform that brings thin-client concepts to the world of robots. The US, looking to capitalize on the growing use of sensor networks, hopes to use robots to monitor a wide range of sensors. Projects in all three countries include plans to deploy robots as "companions" that unobtrusively perform a range of services. View full abstract»

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  • New Products

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 12 - 14
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    In this column, editors Keith Farkas and Guerney Hunt review the newest version of the Microsoft Windows Mobile operating system, technology that can improve cell phone cameras' depth of field, a cell phone that reminds us that usability is an important design principle, and a new mobile computer from Nokia. They also review two research projects that offer promising technology: dual photography and a many-to-many display. View full abstract»

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  • Bringing network effects to pervasive spaces

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 15 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We developed the Obje interoperability framework, a middleware technology that lets networked applications and services coordinate with each another-even when they know almost nothing about one other. We've implemented the current version of the Obje framework (version 4) in Java. It supports both Java and native mobile code and can be implemented in a variety of languages and platforms. It also runs on several platforms, including Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, and Windows PocketPC. Leveraging the Obje framework, we have been able to return to our focus of developing pervasive spaces to explore the human experience of pervasive computing. View full abstract»

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  • Embedded computing and Formula One racing

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 18 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    In countries around the globe, the high end of auto racing is epitomized by Formula One. F1 cars are marvels of high technology. Connected to an experimental transmission and placed in a body designed for its aerodynamic properties, F1's equipment requires constant innovation. To enable data gathering to measure the effects of these innovations, F1 cars (and their drivers) are some of the most heavily instrumented objects in the world. Indeed, you can view the cars as rolling sensor networks, constantly gathering and transmitting information about the car and driver to the rest of the racing team. This information lets the team constantly update its strategy for the current race and improve the car's design for future races. View full abstract»

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  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Pervasive Computing in Sports Technologies

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 22 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    Sensors and other ubiquitous computing technologies have slowly penetrated the arena of sports. This special issue gives some excellent examples of pervasive technology in sports and points to future directions. View full abstract»

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  • A personalized music system for motivation in sport performance

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 26 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (992 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We developed a personalized music system called IM4Sports (interactive music for sports) for individual exercising, although running is the prime target. Research prototype of the system consists of a personal computer, a portable music flash player, a heart sensor strap, and a pedometer. View full abstract»

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  • Computerized real-time analysis of football games

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 33 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1328 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Computer systems support many coaching activities performed before and after competitions, such as strategy development and performance evaluation, but competent assistance during games is much more demanding. It requires real-time interpretation of sensor data, the recognition and classification of ball actions, and fast-action game analysis and assessment. Only recently has high-precision microwave technology enabled computer systems to simultaneously track the position of players and the ball. Consequently, real-time game analysis systems must be able to automatically recognize intentional activities in a multiagent system with continually acting agents. To meet these demands, we've developed the football interaction and process model and a software system that can acquire, interpret, and analyze this model. Our FIPM system can acquire models of player skills, infer action-selection criteria, and determine player and team strengths and weaknesses. View full abstract»

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  • Sensing and monitoring professional skiers

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 40 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1952 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We conducted a project with professional skiers and their trainers in which we used wearable sensors to improve the trainer-athlete relationship by helping them share their observations and impressions. In particular, we analyzed which sensors reveal important features describing the athlete's motions. Visualization software shows the athletes' movements by overlaying and synchronizing a video stream with sensor data. A system based on wearable sensors and video recording can reveal information about a skier's motions, helping trainers identify the skier's strengths and weaknesses. View full abstract»

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  • Introducing wearable force sensors in martial arts

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 47 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1680 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a collaborative effort, the Stanford Taekwondo Program, the Palo Alto Research Center, and Impact Measurement recently developed and introduced sensor technology for the unforgiving environment of the martial arts sparring ring. Our system, called SensorHogu, uses piezoelectric force sensors on body protectors to help Taekwondo judges and referees score tournament matches. We have two objectives for the technology: it should support the judges in accurately scoring the sparring matches, and it should merge with and minimize changes to existing equipment and thus blend into the activity's background. We are currently working with the World Taekwondo Federation (WTF) and United States Taekwondo Union (USTU) to validate and certify the equipment for tournament adoption. View full abstract»

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  • Pervasive computing in sports training

    Publication Year: 2005
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Our system involves a table tennis practice table where one-half of the table in the vertical position returns the player's shots. We use a digital projector calibrated with the table's vertical half, a digital video camera, and a vibration detector mounted on the table. When a ball strikes the wall, the vibration detector triggers the camera to photograph the wall. Our system processes the photograph and projects an image of the ball's impact location onto the wall. The system can also project statistics during play. We designed it to be low cost, to minimize setup time, and to maximize portability. We envisage that the system could work for many interactive games and sports, such as regular tennis, darts, and soccer. View full abstract»

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  • Audio networking: the forgotten wireless technology

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 55 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article, we'll review various modulation schemes we've worked with previously, covering how to transfer data to nearby smart phones as well as usability and security issues. We'll consider audio networking as a mechanism for introducing data packets into ongoing mobile phone calls. We'll also discuss some real-world problems reported with telephone conferencing and apply audio-networking techniques to them in a case study application. View full abstract»

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  • Disconnection prediction in mobile ad hoc networks for supporting cooperative work

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 62 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1088 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We're investigating a specific pervasive architecture that can maintain continuous connections among MANET devices. We're targeting this architecture for computer-supported-cooperative-work (CSCW) and workflow management applications that would constitute the coordination layer. The basic problem of such an architecture is, how do you predict possible disconnections of devices, to let the coordination layer appropriately address connection anomalies? To solve this problem, we've developed a technique for predicting disconnections in MANETS. This technique serves as the basic layer of an innovative pervasive architecture for cooperative work and activity coordination in MANETS. We believe that in emergency scenarios, our proposed pervasive architecture can provide more effective coordination among team members. View full abstract»

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  • DSPs for energy harvesting sensors: applications and architectures

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 72 - 79
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
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    Energy harvesting from human or environmental sources shows promise as an alternative to battery power for embedded digital electronics. Digital signal processors that harvest power from ambient mechanical vibration are particularly promising for sensor networks. View full abstract»

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  • The 2005 UbiApp Workshop: What Makes Good Application-Led Research?

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 80 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Some members of the ubiquitous computing community feel that application-led research needs to make more coherent progress. Their perception is that with few exceptions, such research is neither systematically building on what little new knowledge it has derived so far nor setting specific challenges and benchmarks to guide its progress. In light of these concerns, the 2005 UbiApp workshop's tenet was that ubiquitous computing research could benefit from better metrics for the selection, analysis, and evaluation of applications and common infrastructure. The workshop aimed to identify methodological problems in the way researchers conduct application-led research and to recommend how to address these problems. View full abstract»

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  • From research to classroom a course in pervasive computing

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 83 - 86
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a nutshell, the course is basically about emerging, visible and invisible computing systems and devices. Pervasive computing has many names, including ubiquitous computing, and its key element is the omnipresence of information devices. These devices can be embedded into cars, airplanes, ships, bikes, posters, signboards, walls, and even clothes. The course therefore focuses on independent information devices, including wearable computers, mobile phones, screen phones, and PDAs, and the services made available by them. It includes the study of computer and network architectures for pervasive computing, mobile computing, human-computer interaction using speech and vision, pervasive software systems, and experimental pervasive computing systems. View full abstract»

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  • Wearable computing for the developing world

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 87 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (736 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The project was simple to describe: create a "world computer" that could assist the developing world in leapfrogging the industrial stage of economic development. The World Center for Computing and Human Resources carried out experiments with 6502 machines such as the Apple II, Atari 400, and Atari 800 and established a pilot project in Senegal. In the end, the expense of the computers and the weight of politics limited the project. Yet, several new efforts are reexamining the concept, commonly termed information and communication technologies (ICT) for development. View full abstract»

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  • VoiceLETS backs up first responders

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 92 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    VoiceLETS accesses data in the existing Law Enforcement Tactical System. LETS is a secure Web-based search engine designed to provide personal and vehicle information to law enforcement and criminal justice agencies. It integrates access to several state databases and currently includes photographs, addresses, personal characteristics, and driver and criminal histories from the state's motor vehicles and corrections departments. The University of Alabama's CARE Research and Development Laboratory developed LETS with the goal of making it available to all qualifying agencies over the Internet, including patrol officers using mobile data terminals. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

All aspects of current mobile computing research and applications development, including architectures, support services, algorithms and protocols, mobile environments, mobile communication systems, applications, emerging technologies, and societal impacts.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dr. Roy Want
Intel Research