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MultiMedia, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date July-Sept. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • EIC's Message: Putting Ability to Work

    Page(s): c2
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    The unemployment rate for people with disabilities between the ages of 18 and 65 in the US is estimated at 60 to 70 percent. This astounding ratio makes people with disabilities the largest underemployed sector in the US. One major contributing factor is that many people in this group don’t pursue more marketable professions such as engineering, computing, and information technology. View full abstract»

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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Kooks, obsessives, Sturgeon's law, and the real meaning of search

    Page(s): 4 - 7
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    Collecting and organizing is a basic human activity which leads to the need for retrieval. The author explains what this means for media searching and presents a proposition for what research on media searching should address. View full abstract»

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  • Refocusing multimedia research on short clips

    Page(s): 8 - 13
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    The multimedia authoring research agenda today, is searching for the proverbial killer application. We believe that multimedia's killer app might already be at hand-and it's focused around audio and video clips. But researchers aren't addressing critical open research issues because of the current focus on commercially produced, feature-length videos as an experimental corpus. The article focuses on the notion of multimedia clips, and most especially their retrieval, as a key enabler for the wide adoption of multimedia. View full abstract»

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  • April in Paris: signs of artificial life along the Seine

    Page(s): 14 - 18
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    What if every public space and surface were transformed into an interactive experience - capturing our movements, gestures, sounds and actions and using these to produce new sounds, images, text and actions? Bus stops could come alive and talk back, advertisements could look back at you and talk to you and public park robotic devices could play games with you. Will public places eventually become our social barometer as well as director? Will billboards display the populace's discourse? The author look at some special streets in France where the city is literally alive with art and explores what it might mean for us to live in a world of artistic interactivity. View full abstract»

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  • The art and promise of network analysis

    Page(s): 19 - 21
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    The article discusses collaborative artistic work and the increasing importance of network technologies for all manifestations of human creativity. These observations highlight not only the benefits of collaboration in human networks, but also the possibilities for network analysis in research and creative multimedia. View full abstract»

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  • Immersive electronic books for surgical training

    Page(s): 22 - 35
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    Immersive electronic books (IEBooks) for surgical training will let surgeons explore previous surgical procedures in 3D. The authors describe the techniques and tools for creating a preliminary IEBook, embodying some of the basic concepts. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching content creation with programming

    Page(s): 36 - 45
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    Multimedia is an art form that uses computers as a means of personal expression. However, much multimedia content is unattractive, and many applications have poor user interfaces because many developers don't have training in both programming and content creation. To counteract this, we teach students QuickTime for Java, which provides a rich library for manipulating media. Our students reported an increased understanding of multimedia programming and developed creative skills. View full abstract»

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  • Pervasive computing for interactive virtual heritage

    Page(s): 46 - 58
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    The rapid evolution of pervasive computing technologies enables bringing virtual heritage applications to a new level of user participation. A platform for interactive virtual heritage applications integrates a high-end virtual reality system with wireless, connected portable and wearable computers, facilitating and enhancing user navigation, visualization control, and peer-to-peer information exchange. View full abstract»

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  • Segment-based proxy caching for Internet streaming media delivery

    Page(s): 59 - 67
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    The proliferation of multimedia content on the Internet poses challenges to existing content delivery networks. While proxy caching can successfully deliver traditional text-based static objects, it faces difficulty delivering streaming media objects because of the objects' sizes as well as clients' rigorous continuous delivery demands. We present two techniques supporting segment based proxy caching of streaming media. We evaluated these techniques in simulations and real systems. View full abstract»

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  • Geometric attacks on image watermarking systems

    Page(s): 68 - 78
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    Synchronization errors can lead to significant performance loss in image watermarking methods, as the geometric attacks in the Stirmark benchmark software show. The authors describe the most common types of geometric attacks and survey proposed solutions. View full abstract»

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  • MultiMedia 2005 Editorial Calendar

    Page(s): 79
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Natural interfaces to enhance visitors' experiences

    Page(s): 80 - 85
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    Museums and exhibitions don't communicate. These places are often just a collection of objects, standing deaf in front of visitors. In many cases, objects are accompanied by textual descriptions, usually too short or long to be useful for the visitor. In the last decade, progress in multimedia has allowed for new, experimental forms of communication (using computer technologies) in public spaces. Implementations have ranged from simply using standard PCs with multimedia applications that show thumbnails of image data integrated with text to large theaters that immerse users in virtual worlds or reproduce and display 3D models of masterpieces. Often designers just apply the technology available to traditional museum schemes, without paying much attention to the visitor's experience, particularly to the ways they expect users to interact with the system or to the cognitive and aesthetic factors involved. View full abstract»

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  • Metadata practices for consumer photos

    Page(s): 86 - 92
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    Digital image metadata plays a crucial role in managing digital image repositories. It lets us catalog and maintain large image collections as well as search for and find relevant information. Moreover, describing a digital image with defined metadata schemes lets multiple systems with different platforms and interfaces access and process image metadata. Metadata's wide use in commercial, academic, and educational domains as well as on the Web has propelled the development of new standards for digital image data schemes. The Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association has proposed the Exchangeable Image File Format (EXIF) as a standard for storing administrative metadata in digital image files during acquisition. The International Press Telecommunications Council (IPTC) has developed a standard for storing descriptive metadata information within digital images. These metadata schemas, as well as other emerging standards, provide a standard format for creating, processing, and exchanging digital image metadata and enable image management, analysis, indexing, and search applications. View full abstract»

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  • New Products

    Page(s): 93 - 95
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  • I Want My IPTV

    Page(s): 96
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  • Upcoming Events

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The magazine contains technical information covering a broad range of issues in multimedia systems and applications

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John R. Smith
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center