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Computing in Science & Engineering

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Over-the-Horizon: Not Just for Radar Anymore

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 4 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A few months ago, I heard an interesting colloquium by John Hopcroft, one of the preeminent thinkers in the area of theoretical computer science. His talk mirrored his current investigative passion--future directions in theoretical computer science--but his approach can be instructive to anyone concerned with what I call adaptive anticipation (discerning trends and adapting behavior to changes bef... View full abstract»

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  • Discussions on Sonoluminescence

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 6 - 9
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  • Toumai: reverse-engineering a human ancestor

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (992 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    French anthropologists led by Michel Brunet from the University of Poitiers found only one specimen of Sahelanthropus tchadensis in Chad; they named him Toumai because the word means "hope of life" in the local language. Toumai's uniqueness made him important to anthropology as a whole, but it also made him very difficult to analyze. Anthropologists suspected that Toumai and the rest of his specie... View full abstract»

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  • 3Ms for Instruction, Part 2: Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 14 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editor's Introduction: iSERVO-The International Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 24 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (648 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The international Solid Earth Virtual Observatory (iSERVO; www.iservo.edu.au) is a planned partnership of primarily Asia Pacific economies interested in studying, forecasting, and mitigating the damaging effects of large and great earthquakes as well as the tsunamis they produce. The iSERVO concept is founded on the use of modern information technology to simulate the nonlinear dynamical earthquak... View full abstract»

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  • ACcESS: Australia's contribution to the iSERVO Institute's development

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 27 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2064 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Solid earth systems simulation is now becoming feasible from the microscopic to the global scale. The ACES international cooperation has shown development of simulation capabilities for solid earth phenomena that are beyond the ability of a single group or country. Each country has different strengths, computational approaches, and laboratory and field observational systems. This range of numerica... View full abstract»

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  • The China ACES-iSERVO grid node

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 38 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    China is establishing an advanced supercomputing environment, called the ACES-iSERVO grid node, aimed at furthering the study of earthquake prediction and modeling. This article describes the history of the China ACES-iSERVO grid node, the necessities for establishing it, its current status, and its future development. View full abstract»

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  • Quest for predictability of geodynamic processes through computer simulation

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 43 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2272 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Earth's history includes many catastrophes. Our survival in the 21st century requires that we understand the Earth's inherent variation mechanism and predict future catastrophes by integrating observations and computer simulations. To meet this goal, we need both international and interdisciplinary collaboration. Since 1998, the APEC Cooperation for Earthquake Simulation (ACES) has made great ... View full abstract»

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  • A Web services-based universal approach to heterogeneous fault databases

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 51 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    QuakeSim is a Web browser-based problem-solving environment that provides a set of links between newly available resources from NASA's Earth-observing systems, high-performance simulations, automated data mining, and more traditional tools. It's the first Web services-based, interoperable environment for creating large-scale forward models of earthquake processes. A Web services-based portal provi... View full abstract»

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  • Modeling generic oceanographic data objects in XML

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 58 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The authors define data objects, or bricks, for the ocean-data community based on commonalities across many data types used in ocean environmental research. They then describe a data exchange structure in an XML environment. View full abstract»

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  • Book Review: Is that Your Final Answer?

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 67
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Eigenvalues: valuable principles

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 68 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this homework assignment, we'll study eigenvalue problems arising from partial differential equations. Eigenvalues help us solve differential equations analytically, but they also provide valuable information about a physical system's behavior. Specifically, we'll focus on eigenvalue properties and use them to design a drum with a particular fundamental frequency of vibration. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive atmospheric modeling: scientific computing at its best

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 76 - 83
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2024 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    After more than a decade of development, adaptive methods - in which the computational grid is refined or coarsened to follow the solution's structure - still haven't gained wide acceptance in atmospheric modeling. One main reason is weak technology. Although mathematicians - and physicists and meteorologists - tend to neglect the technical details, the combination of techniques behind efficient a... View full abstract»

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  • PyNSol: objects as scaffolding

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 84 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The author presents a design for a software framework in which object-orientation is used intensively during the construction of an executable but where there is no runtime presence of objects at all. Indeed, they can't be present because the final executable will be compiled and linked from Fortran 77 source. This counterintuitive strategy emerges from the problem domain and its constraints; it i... View full abstract»

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  • The fast Fourier transform for experimentalists. Part II. convolutions

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 92 - 95
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    When undergraduate students first compute a fast Fourief transform (FFT), their initial impression is often a bit misleading. The process all seems so simple and transparent: the software takes care of the computations, and it's easy to create the plots. But once they start probing, students quickly learn that like any rich scientific expression, the implications, the range of applicability, and t... View full abstract»

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  • Let a Hundred Flowers Bloom and a Hundred Schools of Thought Contend!

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Should computational science have a "pope"? In other words, should it be organized into a strict hierarchy, with the individual at the top serving as the supreme pontiff, an unassailable authority who makes all the important decisions on rules and practices and defines how the subject is taught and how it should be advanced? Rather than giving the immediate and obvious answer, let's take a look at... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

CS&E magazine emphasizes articles that help define the field as the interface among the applications (in science and engineering), algorithms (numerical and symbolic), system software, and computer architecture.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
George K. Thiruvathukal
Loyola University