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Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 1978

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 40
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Scanning the issue

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 819 - 820
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Of the same profession

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 821
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • Engineering education: A perspective and some current problems

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 822 - 824
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    Many forces contribute to the rapid changes that have taken place in engineering education; among the current forces are the continuing electronics revolution and the new energy revolution. The most dramatic of the changes since World War II has been the shift from an undergraduate enterprise to one with equal emphasis on graduate study. Of the many problems facing engineering education, it is suggested that special attention be given to the curriculum, to the graduate degrees be given, and to interdisciplinary programs. View full abstract»

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  • The contemplative EE: Engineering history and education

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 825 - 829
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    The actual and potential role of EE history in the education of the undergraduate EE and in the continuing education of the professional EE is examined. Available written and audiovisual materials for use in courses are listed and some options for a self-study program in EE history are given. Research methods, needs and opportunities relating to electrical history are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • An historical analysis of engineering college research and degree programs as dynamic systems

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 829 - 837
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    An analysis is made to illuminate and interpret the recent history of engineering education. The production of engineering degrees and research is modeled as a dynamic process using parameters derived for that purpose. The dominant fact in the production of bachelors degrees is the damped oscillatory growth which characterized the two decades after World War II. Short-term fluctuations exist, but over the long term the growth rate matches U.S. population growth rate. Graduate degree production increased at a constant 12 percent per year between 1956 and 1968, resulting in the ratio of graduate degrees to B.S. degrees increasing from 1:6 to the current 1:2. Methods are developed to classify colleges of engineering according to their dominant characteristic as graduate or undergraduate institutions. Growth in Ph.D. production is shown to have been influenced by a "geographical potential" as well as other factors. Application is made to a method for planning graduate research centers in developing countries. Cost effectiveness in graduate research is shown to correlate with size. The largest colleges are shown to have maintained their productivity while smaller ones declined during periods of decreasing national production. Methods for critical comparison of colleges, departments, and even professors, are discussed and illustrated. View full abstract»

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  • College teaching and the adult consumer: Toward a more sophisticated student body

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 838 - 846
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    This article describes the development of the student consumerism movement. It identifies the factors which have caused the rise of consumerism as an issue in education today-the implications of a change in the age of majority, changing demographics and enrollment trends, and the broader social and political pressures for improved educational services-and some of the results of the consumerism movement. A preliminary report on the response of the University of Nebraska and several other institutions of higher education in Nebraska to this movement is presented in the article. The Nebraska response, an innovative experiment supported in part by the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, is an attempt to make students more sophisticated consumers of their own education. View full abstract»

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  • Identifying, stimulating, and nurturing computer engineers

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 846 - 849
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This paper deals with one company's view of identifying and nurturing promising computer engineers. The structuring of the work and the transition from academia to industry are discussed. It should be noted that much of the process cited is applicable to what is done within the entire company regarding engineering, but as a focus examples from computer development are mentioned and the major computer trends and challenges to computer science and engineering education are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Accreditation: Perspectives and procedures

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 849 - 854
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The historical operation of the engineering accreditation process in which IEEE participates is described, stressing recent changes in procedure. Some key steps in the accreditation process are described, as well as some changes that might come in the future. View full abstract»

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  • Electrical engineering education and certification, validation, and licensing

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 854 - 862
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    Evidence is accumulating that legislative actions will result in new requirements for practicing electrical engineers and electrical engineering educators. These requirements will include registraction and licensing as professional engineers for both groups as well as proof of up-to-date competence before relicensing. Such requirements will provide problems as well as opportunities for electrical engineering educators. The problems are associated with responding to the new require ments while retaining some degree of control over and responsibility for the educational programs. The opportunities are available because continuing education will play an important role in the relicensing of practitioners as well as their career development. This paper will dis cuss the many ramifications of the interface between government, the public, practicing electrical engineers and electrical engineering educators. View full abstract»

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  • Professional engineering education at the Thayer school of engineering

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 862 - 867
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    During the last 15 years, the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College has been developing a professional engineering degree program leading to the B.E., M.E., and D.E. (Doctor of Engineering) degrees. In this article the requirements for these degrees are described, and the differences between the professional program and the research program, leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, are discussed. The major difficulties in operating such a program center around attracting and keeping qualified faculty and ensuring financial viability. In an effort to provide an environment in which a professional program can succeed, the Thayer School of Engineering is proposing to form an engineering design center consisting of two parts: one is the academic part of the Thayer School and the other would be a new separately chartered corporate entity whose primary purpose is the creation of new products. A description of our concept of the new design center is given. View full abstract»

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  • Higher education and technical professionalism at the undergraduate level

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 868 - 871
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    Educational institutions have been greatly influenced by expanding pressures to develop occupation oriented undergraduate programs. These programs can be in serious conflict with the goals of these institutions of higher learning. This paper presents and discusses these conflicts, with a particular emphasis upon engineering education. It is concluded in this work that engineering programs fall far short of their responsibility to higher learning. Further conclusions state that one may no longer be able to define the Twentieth Century university in simple classical terms. Various recommendations reflecting these conclusions are presented. An emphasis is placed on the need to establish an intellectual base for the enginering discipline so that it may be properly included among the disciplines represented in undergraduate schools. Such a definition will require that practitioner oriented material be separated into programs which can be readily identified. These programs should be visibly separate from general undergraduate education so that those entering, funding, and controlling the education process have a clear perspective of the general attitude they must assume. In short, the university must in some fashion reassert itself as a nonprofessional entity if it is to maintain the role of a center for higher learning. View full abstract»

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  • Trends and perspectives in computer science and engineering education

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 872 - 879
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This paper provides an overview of significant developments in computer science and engineering education with discussions on curriculum development, continuing education, and certification. Forecasts of industry needs in the 1980's for computer professionals are included, together with the trends in curriculum developments they may auger. View full abstract»

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  • The impact of digital technology on electrical engineering education

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 880 - 885
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Digital technology has revolutionized electrical engineering education. Students entering engineering schools have a strong background in discrete mathematics that is often augmented by a knowledge of programming and of microcomputers. The electrical engineering curriculum has changed to include digital techniques in all major fields. Computer science and engineering, a discipline that may be taught in either computer science or electrical engineering departments, continues to grow. Software engineering is gaining increasing stature. Digital technology has affected instruction in electrical engineering and other university-level subjects less than it has affected curriculum, but significant computer-assisted or computer-managed instruction can be found. The practice of elecltrical engineering has changed with its acceptance of the computer as a design tool and the advent of the microprocessor. View full abstract»

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  • Software engineering education: Status and prospects

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 886 - 892
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    Software engineering is an emerging field aimed at improving the quality of computer software and the processess used to produce it. The field seeks to transform software creation from an art into an engineering discipline. Efforts have recently begun to teach software engineering concepts to university students and to practicing professionals in industry and government. This paper surveys past and present efforts in software engineering education, describes some existing problems in training software engineers, and outlines likely future developments in educational programs. The outline of a curriculum for a professional master's degree in software engineering is included. View full abstract»

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  • A curriculum in electrooptics for electrical engineers

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 893 - 901
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    A relatively intensive electrooptics curriculum is described in detail, including in particular source material. This curriculum allows undergraduate electrical engineering students who wish to do so to specialize in electrooptics. Constraints somewhat unique to Israel are described, as well as an evaluation of the curriculum based on feedback from graduating students. The academic level is such that over 50 percent of the undergraduate senior projects connected with electrooptics have been published in the international scientific and engineering journals. View full abstract»

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  • A pedagogical palimpsest: Retracing some teaching methods

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 902 - 911
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Curriculum and course-design theory suggests that there may exist a scientific method for the development of effective courses. Some of the important steps in their design include writing of instructional objectives, selection of instruction method, and others. The paper will deal primarily with one step in this sequence: selection of an instruction method. First seven currently deemed important concepts from learning theory, the "psychological building blocks" in the construction of a course, are indentified and analyzed. Next we discuss identifiable educational processes which may be used in a course. We then describe some of the popular teaching methods and show how the building blocks and processes are used in them. The methods discussed include the traditional lecture, lecture discussion, discussion group, laboratory teaching, self-paced instruction, mastery learning, programmed instruction, audiotutorial instruction, and the open university. The paper culminates with the development of two matrices. The first of these defines the interaction between these teaching methods and their usual building blocks. The second, the "utility matrix," attempts to summarize the effect of choice of method on learning, student acceptance, required faculty effort both in development and in long-term use, need for special equipment or personnel, and ultimately cost. View full abstract»

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  • Adapting lifelong learning to adults: Principles and practice

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 911 - 917
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  • Evaluation of graduate engineering education by television at Purdue university

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 918 - 926
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    The Schools of Engineering at Purdue University have an off-Lafayette campus graduate engineering education program in which televised instruction plays a major role. A Lafayette campus class is televised and distributed by a microwave network and/or by videotape to a variety of reception sites, including industrial locations and other campuses. Over fifteen hundred evaluations from sixty courses over eight semesters have been collected from Lafayette and off-Lafayette students. The evaluation data from all televised courses in a single semester are lumped together and then the data are sorted into Lafayette student responses and off-Lafayette student responses (referred to as all-TV student responses). The all-TV responses are then subdivided into TV-with-audio-talkback responses and TV-videotape responses. The data indicate that students do learn by televised instruction, that students prefer TV-with-audio-talkback over videotaped instruction, and that students prefer live instruction to either kind of televised instruction. Some TV reception classes were Staffed with persons paid by Lafayette to provide local class monitoring. The evaluation data from these classes were indistinguishable from the evaluation data from TV classes without paid class monitors. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering colleges and secondary schools

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 927 - 931
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    Engineering colleges are increasingly accepting an important role in secondary education-both to control more humanely the flow of students into engineering education and to initiate the development of public technological literacy. This interaction with precollege education must be designed within the contraints imposed by the secondary school system which has frequently been described as homeostatic. Even in a period of falling enrollments, heavy teaching schedules, and limited resources for change, relatively modest efforts by the engineering colleges (possibly in cooperation with industry) can yield significant results. View full abstract»

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  • A summer engineering-science program

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 932 - 939
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    For the past four years, Albuquerque public high schools and Sandia Laboratories have cooperated in a summer engineering program to attract young people into engineering and science careers. In a joint venture, both organizations have selected students, faculty, and curricula. Sandia Laboratories furnishes instruction and classroom materials, while the Albuquerque Public School System provides students, classrooms, and a high-school supervisor. Although the impact on student participants is difficult to measure, student surveys and faculty comments indicate that the course has been received with enthusiasm. Sandia Laboratories instructors, in particular, have been so positive in their reaction to the students and the public high-school faculty that the summer program is now a permanent part of Sandia's education effort. The structure of this program may be of interest to other engineering and scientific organizations desiring to start a similar cooperative effort with secondary school systems in their communities. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering education throughout the world: A synoptic view

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 940 - 956
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    The United States has benefited in the past by adopting approaches to education that were being used in countries in Europe. Engineering education, in particular, was influenced significantly by ideas initially developed in other nations. In the past few decades, however, with the tremendous advances America has achieved in science, technology, and scholarship, we have become insular as a nation with respect to outside ideas. Studies of the changes that are occurring in the educational systems in many countries, and of the results of those changes, can provide us with new insights to think imaginatively about solutions to the problems that exist within our country. This article describes the systems for engineering education in four nations: West Germany, France, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom. Although necessarily succinct, it provides enough information so that the reader can judge whether he or she would wish to study a particular idea or development in depth. View full abstract»

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  • Continuing education around the world

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 956 - 961
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    Continuing education programs in socialist countries, developing countries, and under French Law 575, with respect to engineering, are discussed. The design of programs depends on cultural, economic, and political pressures. Post-secondary education in socialist countries was influenced by the need to meet demands for trained personnel, by the assumption that it is cheaper to educate the employed, and by continuing education's ability to mix practice with theory. Continuing education in the socialist countries is available through full-time study, part-time study, and independent study with or without supervision. Under French Law 575 continuing education is funded through the State and the employer, with the employer contributing 1 percent of total wages, creating a 5700 million franc fund in 1975. Developing countries have a different emphasis, centering on rural technologies, technician rather than engineer education, and teacher education. The role of the individual, universities, governments, and firms in financing and sponsoring continuing education is placed in worldwide perspective. Lectures in their various formats, correspondence courses, satellite communications, and audiovisual media instructional utility are reviewed. The success or failure of continuing education programs in one country cannot be easily translated into what will happen in another country. All in all, continuing education is more highly regarded worldwide at this point in time than ever before. View full abstract»

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  • Media-based continuing engineering education

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 961 - 968
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    Continuing education activities in universities and within companies themselves have seen phenomenal growth over the last decade because of the economic competition faced by business to utilize the most recent technology available to them. Engineers and scientists have, as have all citizens, had to cope with this changing technology and the pressures of greater productivity required of them. This paper deals with the interfaces between the individual working in business and the universities, professional societies, and industry to help them maintain their professional competence throughout a rapidly changing career. Individual motivation to maintain a learning attitude and the willingness to accept new techniques is a paramount problem to lifelong learning. The time constraints, cost, availability of programs, and the necessity to set individual goals are a few of the problems facing the professional today. This paper addresses the programs being developed by industry, universities, and the professional societies. Emphasis on the IEEE programs are an example of how the professional societies are attempting to meet the needs of their membership. View full abstract»

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  • A company-sponsored program for systems engineering education

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 969 - 972
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    The problem of providing stimulating, effective continuing education for experienced professionals is becoming more acute for industry as technology's development accelerates. Faced with this problem, The MITRE Corporation has developed an in-house educational program whose learning environment is designed to meet the needs of its technical staff: personnel of widely differing educational backgrounds and professional experience. The course format emphasizes problem solving, personal communications, and teamwork. The latest adult education techniques are used and classroom facilities and decor are designed to encourage interaction and interchange of ideas and experiences. The program has proved successful. Learning by doing and personal involvement in team activity have provided motivation and kept interest high, and the cross-fertilization achieved by the interaction among the students has been a valuable byproduct. This paper presents the MITRE program as an example of a successful industry-developed continuing educational activity. It is representative of the kinds of continuing educational activities in which many companies are engaged and as such may be useful to those who are designing such programs of their own. View full abstract»

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The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics.

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Editor-in-Chief
H. Joel Trussell
North Carolina State University