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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date May 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Inside front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Toward an architectural knowledge base for wireless service engineering

    Page(s): 361 - 379
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2880 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless services are software-based services that exploit distribution infrastructure embedded in our everyday life as various communication and computing technologies. Service architecture defines concepts and principles to develop and maintain services to obtain the quality issues with minimum cost and faster time-to-market. In order to boost the development of wireless services, more effective means of using existing architectural know-how and artifacts are required. Our contribution is the architectural knowledge base that introduces three cornerstones: the service taxonomy, reference service architecture, and basic services that alt together provide an efficient means of creating added value with wireless services. The service taxonomy assists in identifying the required functional and quality properties of services and the constraints of the underlying technology platforms. The reference architecture realizes the required properties, based on a selected set of architectural styles and patterns, and provides a skeleton upon which a new end-user service can be developed faster and more easily by using partially ready-made solutions, and furthermore, to keep the architectural knowledge base evolving at the same time. The architectural knowledge base has been validated in several research projects with industrial companies. View full abstract»

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  • Reliability and validity in comparative studies of software prediction models

    Page(s): 380 - 391
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Empirical studies on software prediction models do not converge with respect to the question "which prediction model is best?" The reason for this lack of convergence is poorly understood. In this simulation study, we have examined a frequently used research procedure comprising three main ingredients: a single data sample, an accuracy indicator, and cross validation. Typically, these empirical studies compare a machine learning model with a regression model. In our study, we use simulation and compare a machine learning and a regression model. The results suggest that it is the research procedure itself that is unreliable. This lack of reliability may strongly contribute to the lack of convergence. Our findings thus cast some doubt on the conclusions of any study of competing software prediction models that used this research procedure as a basis of model comparison. Thus, we need to develop more reliable research procedures before we can have confidence in the conclusions of comparative studies of software prediction models. View full abstract»

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  • Scenario-based assessment of nonfunctional requirements

    Page(s): 392 - 409
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2496 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a method and a tool for validating nonfunctional requirements in complex socio-technical systems. The system requirements analyzer (SRA) tool validates system reliability and operational performance requirements using scenario-based testing. Scenarios are transformed into sequences of task steps and the reliability of human agents performing tasks with computerized technology is assessed using Bayesian belief network (BN) models. The tool tests system performance within an envelope of environmental variations and reports the number of tests that pass a benchmark threshold. The tool diagnoses problematic areas in scenarios representing pathways through system models, assists in the identification of their causes, and supports comparison of alternative requirements specifications and system designs. It is suitable for testing socio-technical systems where operational scenarios are sequential and deterministic, in domains where designs are incrementally modified so set up costs of the BNs can be defrayed over multiple tests. View full abstract»

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  • An empirical investigation of the key factors for success in software process improvement

    Page(s): 410 - 424
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (744 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Understanding how to implement software process improvement (SPI) successfully is arguably the most challenging issue facing the SPI field today. The SPI literature contains many case studies of successful companies and descriptions of their SPI programs. However, the research efforts to date are limited and inconclusive and without adequate theoretical and psychometric justification. This paper extends and integrates models from prior research by performing an empirical investigation of the key factors for success in SPI. A quantitative survey of 120 software organizations was designed to test the conceptual model and hypotheses of the study. The results indicate that success depends critically on six organizational factors, which explained more than 50 percent of the variance in the outcome variable. The main contribution of the paper is to increase the understanding of the influence of organizational issues by empirically showing that they are at least as important as technology for succeeding with SPI and, thus, to provide researchers and practitioners with important new insights regarding the critical factors of success in SPI. View full abstract»

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  • TSE Information for authors

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org