By Topic

Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2005

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1520 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (816 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • From the Editor in Chief: Patent Pending

    Page(s): 4 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    I’ve always believed that one of the keys to success is knowing the rules of the game. Finding the rules fair but being unhappy with the effect is called result mongering. Much of the legal fighting over intellectual property today seems more about achieving particular results than optimizing the overall economy. The details of IP law are worked out in the political process, a space where those who have the most to gain from changes often exert the most influence and where local optimization might not give the best overall results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Municipal wireless networks open new access and old debates

    Page(s): 8 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    Around the world, ever-increasing numbers of government agencies are either deploying 802.11 wireless networks for public and administrative uses or studying how to do so. However, the booming popularity of municipal wireless networks has also amplified an ongoing public policy dispute, especially in the US. The author discuss the new access supports and the old debates of municipal wireless networks. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • From the Newsstand

    Page(s): 12 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    Review of Internet-related stories in IEEE, Computer Society, and trade press. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Information Discovery--Needles and Haystacks

    Page(s): 16 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    For thousands of years, people have realized the importance of archiving and finding information. With the advent of computers, it became possible to store large amounts of information in electronic form -- and finding useful needles in the resulting haystacks has since become one of the most important problems in information management. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Search adaptations and the challenges of the Web

    Page(s): 19 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)  

    Search has become a hot topic in Internet computing, with rival search engines battling to become the de facto Web portal, harnessing search algorithms to wade through information on a scale undreamed of by early information retrieval (IR) pioneers. This article examines how search has matured from its roots in specialized IR systems to become a key foundation of the Web. The authors describe new challenges posed by the Web's scale, and show how search is changing the nature of the Web as much as the Web has changed the nature of search. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mapping the semantics of Web text and links

    Page(s): 27 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1656 KB)  

    Search engines use content and links to search, rank, cluster, and classify Web pages. These information discovery applications use similarity measures derived from this data to estimate relatedness between pages. However, little research exists on the relationships between similarity measures or between such measures and semantic similarity. The author analyzes and visualizes similarity relationships in massive Web data sets to identify how to integrate content and link analysis for approximating relevance. He uses human-generated metadata from Web directories to estimate semantic similarity and semantic maps to visualize relationships between content and link cues and what these cues suggest about page meaning. Highly heterogeneous topical maps point to a critical dependence on search context. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ranking complex relationships on the semantic Web

    Page(s): 37 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB)  

    Industry and academia are both focusing their attention on information retrieval over semantic metadata extracted from the Web, and it is increasingly possible to analyze such metadata to discover interesting relationships. However, just as document ranking is a critical component in today's search engines, the ranking of complex relationships would be an important component in tomorrow's semantic Web engines. This article presents a flexible ranking approach to identify interesting and relevant relationships in the semantic Web. The authors demonstrate the scheme's effectiveness through an empirical evaluation over a real-world data set. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Selective replication for content management environments

    Page(s): 45 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)  

    Content management applications typically depend on information stored in both relational database tables and operating system files. Often, content providers replicate all or parts of the available database data and associated files to increase application availability, address resource constraints and costs, or better support geographically dispersed and mobile users. This article presents a solution that addresses integrated and selective database and file replication in the context of an enterprise voice portal. The solution is transparent to existing applications and imposes minimal storage overhead. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An e-service infrastructure for power distribution

    Page(s): 52 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (368 KB)  

    Delivering Web services based on data collected from distributed networks of smart devices presents several business and data-integration challenges for providers. Enterprise users need a scalable, standards-based mechanism that lets them run services without becoming experts in the technical aspects of service delivery. The Inside software infrastructure attempts to provide such a solution. Inside uses the Java 2 Enterprise Edition, the Open Services Gateway Initiative, and a suite of mediation components to address issues of scalability, dynamism, and transparency. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • How BPEL and SOA are changing Web services development

    Page(s): 60 - 67
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (528 KB)  

    As the use of Web services grows, organizations are increasingly choosing the Business Process Execution Language for modeling business processes within the Web services architecture. In addition to orchestrating organizations' Web services, BPEL's strengths include asynchronous message handling, reliability, and recovery. By developing Web services with BPEL in mind, organizations can implement aspects of the service-oriented architecture that might previously have been difficult to achieve. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Multiprotocol label switching and IP. Part I. MPLS VPNs over IP tunnels

    Page(s): 68 - 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB)  

    Multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) is a tunneling technology used in many service provider networks. The most popular MPLS-enabled application in use today is the MPLS virtual private network, MPLS VPNs were developed to operate over MPLS networks, but they can also run over native IP networks. This offers providers flexibility in network-deployment choices, improved routing system scalability, and greater reach to customers. The key element is the ability to encapsulate MPLS packets in IP tunnels. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Moving from business to technology with service-based processes

    Page(s): 73 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB)  

    In most organizations, business process realizations must be aligned with existing systems, which can impose specific requirements. Currently, however, there is no way to track the alignment between business processes and corresponding technical implementations. The authors' proposed framework offers a systematic way to classify and assess technical realizations of business processes. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Secure electronic data interchange over the Internet

    Page(s): 82 - 89
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    The electronic data interchange over the Internet (EDI-INT) standards provide a secure means of transporting EDI and XML business documents over the Internet. EDI-INT includes different implementation protocols that work over the Internet's three major transports - SMTP, HTTP, and FTP. Each uses secure multipurpose Internet mail extensions (S/MIME), digital signatures, encryption, and message-receipt validation to ensure the necessary security for business-to-business communications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • WS-Addressing metadata [Web services]

    Page(s): 90 - 93
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB)  

    Any Web services endpoint, or more generally, virtually any distributed systems endpoint, incorporates various forms of metadata. EPRs do not support multiport services, which are common within multiprotocol enterprise systems. EPRs do not help with service availability issues, given that they could contain only a single service address. In this article, the author reviews these concerns and explores how the recent additions to the draft specification resolve them. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Scalable access to scientific data

    Page(s): 94 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (640 KB)  

    The author use a simple analytic model to analyze the scalability of an infrastructure that generates high-level data products derived from raw data and then delivers them in response to user requests. He also discusses the concept of metadata and how it generally facilitates access to scientific data. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University