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NanoBioscience, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publication information

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  • Nanorobotics control design: a collective behavior approach for medicine

    Page(s): 133 - 140
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    The authors present a new approach using genetic algorithms, neural networks, and nanorobotics concepts applied to the problem of control design for nanoassembly automation and its application in medicine. As a practical approach to validate the proposed design, we have elaborated and simulated a virtual environment focused on control automation for nanorobotics teams that exhibit collective behavior. This collective behavior is a suitable way to perform a large range of tasks and positional assembly manipulation in a complex three-dimensional workspace. We emphasize the application of such techniques as a feasible approach for the investigation of nanorobotics system design in nanomedicine. Theoretical and practical analyses of control modeling is one important aspect that will enable rapid development in the emerging field of nanotechnology. View full abstract»

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  • Cellular automata with object-oriented features for parallel molecular network modeling

    Page(s): 141 - 148
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    Cellular automata are an important modeling paradigm for studying the dynamics of large, parallel systems composed of multiple, interacting components. However, to model biological systems, cellular automata need to be extended beyond the large-scale parallelism and intensive communication in order to capture two fundamental properties characteristic of complex biological systems: hierarchy and heterogeneity. This paper proposes extensions to a cellular automata language, Cellang, to meet this purpose. The extended language, with object-oriented features, can be used to describe the structure and activity of parallel molecular networks within cells. Capabilities of this new programming language include object structure to define molecular programs within a cell, floating-point data type and mathematical functions to perform quantitative computation, message passing capability to describe molecular interactions, as well as new operators, statements, and built-in functions. We discuss relevant programming issues of these features, including the object-oriented description of molecular interactions with molecule encapsulation, message passing, and the description of heterogeneity and anisotropy at the cell and molecule levels. By enabling the integration of modeling at the molecular level with system behavior at cell, tissue, organ, or even organism levels, the program will help improve our understanding of how complex and dynamic biological activities are generated and controlled by parallel functioning of molecular networks. View full abstract»

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  • Fast parallel molecular algorithms for DNA-based computation: factoring integers

    Page(s): 149 - 163
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    The RSA public-key cryptosystem is an algorithm that converts input data to an unrecognizable encryption and converts the unrecognizable data back into its original decryption form. The security of the RSA public-key cryptosystem is based on the difficulty of factoring the product of two large prime numbers. This paper demonstrates to factor the product of two large prime numbers, and is a breakthrough in basic biological operations using a molecular computer. In order to achieve this, we propose three DNA-based algorithms for parallel subtractor, parallel comparator, and parallel modular arithmetic that formally verify our designed molecular solutions for factoring the product of two large prime numbers. Furthermore, this work indicates that the cryptosystems using public-key are perhaps insecure and also presents clear evidence of the ability of molecular computing to perform complicated mathematical operations. View full abstract»

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  • Electrochemical determination of reversible redox species at interdigitated array micro/nanoelectrodes using charge injection method

    Page(s): 164 - 169
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    In this work, the interdigitated array microelectrodes/nanoelectrodes (∼0.2 mm2 surface area) have been fabricated and characterized using the charge injection method for the electrochemical determination of reversible redox species. Using p-aminophenol as the redox species, approximately 4×10-7 M and 6×10-9 M detection limits on the species concentration are respectively achieved with the microelectrodes and the nanoelectrodes. View full abstract»

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  • Cellular response to gelatin- and fibronectin-coated multilayer polyelectrolyte nanofilms

    Page(s): 170 - 179
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    Surface engineering is a critical effort in defining substrates for cell culture and tissue engineering. In this context, multilayer self-assembly is an attractive method for creating novel composites with specialized chemical and physical properties that is currently drawing attention for potential application in this area. In this work, effects of thickness, surface roughness, and surface material of multilayer polymer nanofilms on the growth of rat aortic smooth muscle cells were studied. Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) electrostatically constructed from poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) with gelatin, fibronectin, and PSS surface coatings were evaluated for interactions with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in an in vitro environment. The results prove that PEMs terminated with cell-adhesive proteins promote the attachment and further growth of SMCs, and that this property is dependent upon the number of layers in the underlying multilayer film architecture. Cell roundness and number of pseudopodia were also influenced by the number of layers in the nanofilms. These findings are significant in that they demonstrate that both surface coatings and underlying architecture of nanofilms affect the morphology and growth of SMCs, which means additional degrees of freedom are available for design of biomaterials. This work supports the excellent potential of nanoassembled ultrathin films for biosurface engineering, and points to a novel perspective for controlling cell-material interaction that can lead to an elegant system for defining the extracellular in vitro environment. View full abstract»

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  • Carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications

    Page(s): 180 - 195
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1572 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have many unique physical, mechanical, and electronic properties. These distinct properties may be exploited such that they can be used for numerous applications ranging from sensors and actuators to composites. As a result, in a very short duration, CNTs appear to have drawn the attention of both the industry and the academia. However, there are certain challenges that need proper attention before the CNT-based devices can be realized on a large scale in the commercial market. In this paper, we report the use of CNTs for biomedical applications. The paper describes the distinct physical, electronic, and mechanical properties of nanotubes. The basics of synthesis and purification of CNTs are also reviewed. The challenges associated with CNTs, which remain to be fully addressed for their maximum utilization for biomedical applications, are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Molecular photovoltaics and the photoactivation of mammalian cells

    Page(s): 196 - 200
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    Photosynthetic reaction centers are integral plant membrane protein complexes and molecular photovoltaic structures. We report here that addition of Photosystem I (PSI)-proteoliposomes to retinoblastoma cells imparts photosensitivity to these mammalian cells, as demonstrated by light-induced movement of calcium ions. Control experiments with liposomes lacking PSI demonstrated no photosensitivity. The data demonstrate that PSI, a nanoscale molecular photovoltaic structure extracted from plants, can impart a photoresponse to mammalian cells in vitro. View full abstract»

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  • Comment on "Nanorobotics Control Design: A Collective Behavior Approach for Medicine

    Page(s): 201 - 202
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    The limitations on nanorobot design and activity imposed by Brownian motion events, communication problems, and the nature of the intercellular space are discussed. It is shown that severe problems exist for a nanorobot designed to enter tissues for therapeutic purposes when it is smaller than about 1$muhboxm$in any one of its dimensions. View full abstract»

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  • Comment on "Nanorobotics control design: a collective behavior approach for medicine"

    Page(s): 202 - 203
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    Following the paper by Calcavani and Freitas (see ibid., vol.4, no.2, p.133-40, 2005), the limitations on nanorobot design and activity imposed by Brownian motion events, communication problems, and the nature of the intercellular space are discussed. It is shown that severe problems exist for a nanorobot designed to enter tissues for therapeutic purposes when it is smaller than about 1 μm in any one of its dimensions. View full abstract»

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  • 2006 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro (ISBI'06)

    Page(s): 204
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  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience Information for authors

    Page(s): c3
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  • Blank page [back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publishes basic and applied papers dealing both with engineering, physics, chemistry, modeling and computer science and with biology and medicine with respect to molecules, cells, tissues. The content of acceptable papers ranges from practical/clinical/environmental applications to formalized mathematical theory.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Henry Hess
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Columbia University