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Software, IEE Proceedings -

Issue 1 • Date 7 Feb. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Editorial reusable software libraries

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1
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  • Template-based construction of verified software

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2 - 12
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    The use of formal verification to prove the correctness of software is increasingly being mandated by international standards for the development of safety critical systems. While formal development environments exist to assist in formal software development, formal verification is still an extremely difficult and time-consuming task, requiring expert skills not possessed by the typical software engineer. The authors propose a component-based development approach, where the aim is not so much to make savings in the cost of implementation, but instead to reduce the amount of verification that the software engineer needs to perform, as well as reducing the complexity of any remaining verification. This is achieved by providing reusable design templates that have been verified offline by an expert in mathematical logic and theorem proving. An important feature of the template language is the presence of higher-order parameters, which enable templates to be defined that are more widely applicable, thus giving better value for the one-off verification effort. View full abstract»

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  • Development and use of dynamic product-line architectures

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 15 - 28
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  • Taxonomy-based software construction of SPARE Time: a case study

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 29 - 37
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    The authors consider the design and implementation of SPARE Time as an example of taxonomy-based software construction (TABASCO). SPARE Time is a C++ toolkit for keyword pattern matching. It differs from other toolkits in that it is based on a taxonomy of keyword pattern matching algorithms. They discuss the aims of TABASCO and of taxonomy construction and taxonomy-based toolkit design in particular. They show how the taxonomy structure induces the architecture and design of SPARE Time. The taxonomy-oriented derivation also makes the toolkit easier to understand and use. The toolkit - like the taxonomy - contains the well known Knuth-Morris-Pratt, Boyer-Moore, Aho-Corasick and Commentz-Walter algorithms, as well as variants thereof, including more recent algorithms such as Backward Oracle Matching. It is freely available for noncommercial use. View full abstract»

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  • Reflective designs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 38 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The authors render runtime system adaptations by design-level concepts such that running systems can be adapted and examined at a higher level of abstraction. The overall idea is to express design decisions as applications of design operators to be carried out at runtime. Design operators can implement design patterns for use at runtime. Applications of design operators are made explicit as design elements in the running system such that they can be traced, reconfigured, and made undone. This approach enables reflective designs: on one side, design operators employ reflection to perform runtime adaptations; on the other side, design elements provide an additional reflection protocol to examine and configure performed adaptations. The approach helps understanding the development and the maintenance of the class of software systems that cannot tolerate downtime or frequent shutdown-revise-startup cycles. The authors have designed and implemented a class library for programming with reflective designs in Squeak/Smalltalk. The library employs reflection and dynamic aspect-oriented programming. In addition to that, the authors have implemented tool support for versatile navigation in a system that is adapted continuously at runtime. View full abstract»

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