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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Table of contents

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  • IEEE Transactions on Education publication information

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  • Integrating formal verification into an advanced computer architecture course

    Page(s): 216 - 222
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    This paper presents a sequence of three projects on design and formal verification of pipelined and superscalar processors: 1) a single-issue, five-stage DLX (an academic processor used widely for teaching pipelined execution and defined by Hennessy and Patterson in the first edition of their graduate textbook); 2) an extension of the DLX with exceptions and branch prediction; and 3) a dual-issue superscalar DLX. The projects were integrated into two editions of an advanced computer architecture course that was offered at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, in the summer and fall 2002 and was taught to 67 students (25 of whom were undergraduates) in a way that required them to have no prior knowledge of formal methods. Preparatory homework problems included an exercise on design and formal verification of a staggered Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU), pipelined in the style of the integer ALUs in the Intel Pentium 4. The processors were designed and formally verified with a tool flow that was used to formally verify the M·CORE processor at Motorola and detected bugs. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching telecommunications to electronics technical engineers: an integral course on telecommunication systems

    Page(s): 223 - 229
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the rationale and the content of a two-semester four-hour-per-week course titled Telecommunication Systems. The course covers telecommunications in an overall manner, avoiding the segmentation of the telecommunications subject and introducing the student to the theoretical and engineering aspects of telecommunications in the shortest time possible. The course consists of six consecutive modules (basics, signals and systems, transmission techniques, telecommunication links, networks and services, and market issues). Besides offering background telecommunication knowledge and providing the student with a clear and well-structured overview of the overall telecommunications subject, it aims at introducing the student to the basic methodology for treating practical engineering problems. View full abstract»

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  • Design and evaluation of an XML-based platform-independent computerized adaptive testing system

    Page(s): 230 - 237
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (592 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper is an attempt to design and to evaluate the platform-independent computerized adaptive testing (CAT) system, which can expand the diversity of CAT-administering platforms. By using extensible markup language (XML) to describe the item bank, one might find the implementation of CAT on a different platform, such as a personal computer (PC), a personal digital assistant (PDA), and other handheld devices, more convenient. An experiment was conducted to examine the effects of a CAT administration platform on precision and efficiency. Fifty senior high school students were selected to take an English vocabulary CAT both on PC and PDA, which enabled them to compare the relevant advantages with the disadvantages of the two different administration platforms firsthand. Both tests used the same-size, well-calibrated item bank, ability estimation algorithm, and item selection strategy. The results indicate that the platforms on which examinees take CAT do not affect the performance of CAT. The responses of the questionnaire on the testing environment also show that most examinees prefer to take the test on PDA. It is concluded that using a PDA to administer CAT is both as precise and effective as a PC and more enjoyable and convenient. View full abstract»

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  • A tool for supporting the teaching of parallel database systems

    Page(s): 238 - 247
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3232 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Parallel database systems are complex entities. When teaching about these systems as part of a course in a limited time, one has difficulty providing useful practical experience that gives a deep insight into system behavior and operation. This paper describes a tool for performance prediction that has been developed to aid the visualization of parallel database systems and that is currently being used to support teaching. The tool enables students to experiment with different hardware and software configurations and to view the effects of changes on the performance of the system. The tool provides insight into how data can be placed among the nodes of a parallel machine according to predefined strategies, as well as manually, and provides feedback on the effect of these on throughput and response time. This tool is able to provide a good appreciation of the concepts in a relatively short period of time. View full abstract»

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  • Motivation and nonmajors in computer science: identifying discrete audiences for introductory courses

    Page(s): 248 - 253
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Traditional introductory computer science (CS) courses have had little success engaging non-computer science majors. At the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, where introductory CS courses are a requirement for CS majors and nonmajors alike, two tailored introductory courses were introduced as an alternative to the traditional course. The results were encouraging: more nonmajors succeeded (completed and passed) in tailored courses than in the traditional course, students expressed fewer negative reactions to the course content, and many reported that they would be interested in taking another tailored CS course. The authors present findings from a pilot study of the three courses and briefly discuss some of the issues surrounding the tailored courses for nonmajors: programming, context, choice of language, and classroom culture. View full abstract»

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  • The light applications in science and engineering research collaborative undergraduate laboratory for teaching (LASER CULT)-relevant experiential learning in photonics

    Page(s): 254 - 263
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An integrative undergraduate photonics curriculum has been developed that utilizes three active learning methods: case studies, team learning, and project-based learning (PBL). This two-course sequence at Oklahoma State University's Light Applications in Science and Engineering Research Collaborative Undergraduate Laboratory for Teaching (LASER CULT), is designed as an introduction to optics and photonics for electrical engineering students. The LASER CULT has three primary goals: make course concepts more relevant to students, provide students with training and positive experiences in functioning on a team, and introduce in-depth projects that require higher level problem-solving skills, such as evaluation and synthesis. To accomplish these goals, which are synergistic with Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) outcomes, LASER CULT courses use two in-depth design projects that are constructed by student teams under realistic constraints rather than focusing on hierarchical concepts. The relevance of course content to students is increased by recreating the environment of practicing engineers. Assessment data, measured through individual reflection included in team portfolios and student assessment of learning gains, demonstrate the effectiveness of this format for meeting course goals and ABET criteria and pipelining students into graduate school. View full abstract»

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  • Flexible web-based educational system for teaching computer architecture and organization

    Page(s): 264 - 273
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (968 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An important problem in teaching courses in computer architecture and organization is to find a way to help students to make a cognitive leap from the blackboard description of a computer system to its utilization as a programmable device. Computer simulators developed to tackle this problem vary in scope, target architecture, user interface, and support for distance learning. Usually, they include the processor only, lacking the whole-system perspective. The existing simulators mainly focus on the programmer's view of the machine and do not provide the designer's perspective. This paper presents an educational computer system and its Web-based simulator, designed to help teaching and learning computer architecture and organization courses. The educational computer system is designed to cover a broad spectrum of topics taught in lower division courses. It offers a unique environment that exposes students to both the programmer and the designer's perspective of the computer system. The Web-based simulator features an interactive animation of program execution and allows students to navigate through different levels of the educational computer system's hierarchy-starting from the top level with block representation down to the implementation level with standard sequential and combinational logic blocks. View full abstract»

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  • A simple derivation of the spectral transformations for IIR filters

    Page(s): 274 - 278
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A simple method is given for deriving the spectral transformations for infinite-impulse response (IIR) filters, which can be used to transform a prototype low-pass (LP) digital filter to another LP, high-pass (HP), bandpass (BP), or band-stop (BS) digital filter with prescribed passband edge(s) and the same tolerances as those of the prototype. The method is based on a combination of bilinear transformation with the analog frequency transformation and is simpler-conceptually, as well as from the calculation point of view-than the conventional method based on all-pass transformation functions. View full abstract»

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  • An undergraduate system-on-chip (SoC) course for computer engineering students

    Page(s): 279 - 289
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1016 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The authors have developed a senior-level undergraduate system-on-chip (SoC) course at San Jose State University, San Jose, CA, that emphasizes SoC design methods and hardware-software codesign techniques. The course uses a "real world" design project as the teaching vehicle and implements an SoC platform to control a five-axis robotic arm using Altera's state-of-the-art Excalibur chip. The Excalibur chip contains both ARM Corporation's embedded processor and a programmable logic device (PLD) array. The course goes through a complete hardware-software codesign flow from implementing custom hardware devices on a PLD to developing an embedded algorithm in a state-of-the-art design environment for a complete SoC solution. Students learn the Quartus II design environment by examining the sample design files in Altera's EXPA1 development kit and following the step-by-step instructions toward creating a simple embedded application. After this familiarization process, students define the architectural specifications of a memory-mapped servo controller, implement it in the Excalibur's PLD array, and interface this device with the ARM processor's internal bus to control each robotic arm servo. Functional regression tests and post-synthesis timing verification steps are applied to the servo controller following the implementation phase. Subsequently, students integrate the servo controller with the rest of the system and perform board-level functional verification tests to observe whether the robotic arm can move an object from a source to a destination point accurately. Students also develop an embedded algorithm, which translates user inputs in Cartesian coordinates into robotic arm movements in spherical coordinates during laboratory sessions. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching reconfigurable systems: methods, tools, tutorials, and projects

    Page(s): 290 - 300
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (848 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an approach that has been used for teaching disciplines on reconfigurable computing and advanced digital systems, which are intended to cover such topics as architectures and capabilities of field-programmable logic devices; languages for the specification, modeling, and synthesis of digital systems; design methods; computer-aided design tools; reconfiguration techniques; and practical applications. To assist the educational process, the following units have been developed and employed in the pedagogical practice: animated tutorials, miniprojects, hardware templates, and course-oriented library of digital circuits. To stimulate the student's activity, an optional project-based evaluation technique has been applied. All the materials that are required for students are available on the university website (WebCT) and can easily be used for studying inside the university, for obtaining additional information during practical classes and for distance learning. View full abstract»

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  • Understanding motivations for Internet use in distance education

    Page(s): 301 - 306
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    Uses and Gratifications (U & G) is a communications theory paradigm developed to understand media-use motivations. This research paradigm has recently been applied to understand motivations for Internet use. Internet U & G typically orient to distinct process-based, content-based, and socially based motivations for use of the network. This study applies U & G to examine the Internet usage motivations of technology students enrolled in an Internet-enabled distance education course and finds that digital content is highly sought after by students in Internet-supported distance education classes. Distance education students are also motivated to use Internet communication resources to offset the lack of social interaction found in normal classrooms. Students' Internet usage process motivations actually diverge into two distinct areas, related generally to searching versus browsing in the support of learning objectives. View full abstract»

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  • Using PSpice in teaching impulse Voltage testing of power transformers to senior undergraduate students

    Page(s): 307 - 312
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes an efficient method of teaching impulse voltage testing of power transformers to undergraduate students of power system groups in electrical engineering departments, as a part of a high-voltage course for senior undergraduate students. The paper shows how to simulate the power transformer and impulse generator to teach students the basics of impulse voltage testing of power transformers and to practice analyzing the test results. In the first part of the paper, the effect of wave shaping of the voltage waveform is simulated to teach the behavior of the impulse generator, and in the second part, impulse voltage testing of a transformer is simulated. Evaluation of the simulation over several semesters with more than 80 students is very positive in terms of their developing confidence in an understanding of this test. View full abstract»

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  • Assessment of a case study laboratory to increase awareness of ethical issues in engineering

    Page(s): 313 - 317
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Case studies in engineering ethics were integrated into a first course in electrical and computer engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), Worcester, MA, with the primary objective of increasing students' awareness of ethical issues in the workplace. During a three-hour "laboratory" period, students read and discussed three short case studies in engineering ethics, focusing on understanding the differing viewpoints of individuals within a case and identifying multiple courses of action for resolving the issue. The effects of the laboratory were assessed via student focus groups and surveys. All focus group participants agreed that their awareness of ethical issues in engineering was enhanced by the laboratory. In contrast, the survey results were equivocal, showing improvement in the students' awareness of ethical issues; however, the particular questions found to differ statistically pre-intervention versus post-intervention were not consistent between course offerings. View full abstract»

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  • A test lab for the performance analysis of TCP over ethernet LAN on windows operating system

    Page(s): 318 - 328
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A test laboratory for the performance analysis of the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the teaching of its basic concepts is proposed. The laboratory environment is a small Ethernet local area network (LAN) with PCs running different versions of the Windows operating system (95/98/NT/2000). To support the Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) for Windows and to improve flexibility, the Netperf TCP software tool has been modified. Based on the modified Netperf and a protocol analyzer, students perform traffic measurements on a real network. Various aspects of the Microsoft TCP implementation for Windows are discovered and clearly explained. The IPv6 for Windows 2000 is also examined, and comparisons with IPv4 are made. View full abstract»

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  • Practical laboratory project in telemedicine: Supervision of electrocardiograms by mobile telephony

    Page(s): 329 - 336
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    This paper describes a project carried out in the laboratory of Principles of Bioengineering within the Telecommunications Engineering degree (five academic years plus a final thesis). The main object of this project is to set up a portable system for the acquisition, analysis, and transmission by mobile telephony of the electrocardiogram (ECG) of an indeterminate number of patients. The network of patients is managed from a control center (CC), comprising a personal computer (PC) with application software and a mobile telephony communications system. In a real system, each patient would have a patient terminal with a microprocessor-based, ECG-acquisition system with processing and transmission by mobile telephony. Time and technical considerations mean that, in the project, the patient terminal will have to be implemented in a PC. To perform this project, the students must have a wide range of knowledge acquired in this course and in other subjects required for this degree: design of bioamplifiers, information-processing algorithms, mobile-telephony communications, user-interface programming, etc. Having to use these concepts will no doubt serve as a stimulus to the students carrying out the work. View full abstract»

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  • Analyzing course configurations for teaching object-oriented modeling and design

    Page(s): 337 - 339
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    This paper presents and analyzes an object-oriented analysis and design course that has been given in three different configurations for students who are already familiar with object-oriented programming. The results show that the course configurations have not had a major impact on the students' performances. View full abstract»

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  • Special issue on grid-based technologies applied to education

    Page(s): 340
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  • IEEE Transactions on Education information for authors

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  • Blank page [back cover]

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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University