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Computing in Science & Engineering

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Way Forward: Learning from Our Past

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Testimony from past readers drives this issue's content and approach. High on their wish list are a greater emphasis on science content, a more tutorial approach to computation, and a stronger, more utilitarian character. These are appropriate because science sets the context for—and computation, the practice of—computing in science and engineering. But isn't this what we are doing? Ou... View full abstract»

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  • Computing life's family tree [phylogeny]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 3 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (728 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Call it yet another biological gold rush. When Charles Darwin published The Origin of Species in 1859, scientists began working in earnest to document the world's plant and animal species and build a phylogeny - a map of how all those species relate to each other. More scientists came to the discipline in the 1980s, when automated DNA sequencing offered a way to classify species and applications f... View full abstract»

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  • 3Ms for Instruction: Reviews of Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 7 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (904 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Most CiSE readers have probably used Maple, Mathematica, or Matlab for several years. With this review series, our goal is to help you now decide whether one of the others is better suited to your temperament and current practice than your original choice. For those of you new to integrative computing packages, our goal is to enable you to make an informed first choice. In this installment, we beg... View full abstract»

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  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Multiphysics Modeling

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 14 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fueled by breakthroughs in both hardware and algorithm development, the past few decades have witnessed an explosive growth in computational power, which has led to remarkable advances in various fields of science and technology, such as the mapping of the human genome. It also set the stage for addressing even more ambitious goals, many of which can't be achieved through hardware developments alo... View full abstract»

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  • An equation-free, multiscale approach to uncertainty quantification

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 16 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2968 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The authors' equation- and Galerkin-free computational approach to uncertainty quantification for dynamical systems conducts UQ computations using short bursts of appropriately initialized ensembles of simulations. Their basic procedure estimates the quantities arising in stochastic Galerkin computations. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive mesh refinement for multiscale nonequilibrium physics

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 24 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate how to use adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methods for the study of phase transition kinetics. In particular, they apply a block-structured AMR approach to investigate phase ordering in the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. View full abstract»

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  • Noise in algorithm refinement methods

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 32 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (432 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Hybrid or algorithm refinement (AR) schemes have focused mainly on the mean behavior of system states. However, variances in these behaviors, such as spontaneous fluctuations, are important for modeling certain phenomena. This paper discusses the effects of statistical fluctuations on hybrid computational methods that combine a particle algorithm with a partial differential equation solver. View full abstract»

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  • A seamless approach to multiscale complex fluid simulation

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 39 - 46
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (704 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Dissipative particle dynamics is an efficient and accurate mesoscale simulation method that bridges the gap between molecular dynamics and continuum hydrodynamics. Using time-staggered algorithms, it can simulate complex liquids and dense suspensions more than 100,000 faster than molecular dynamics. View full abstract»

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  • Patch dynamics for multiscale problems

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 47 - 53
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (696 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The engineering analysis and microscopic simulations required for predicting materials' properties from atomistic descriptions require approaches for predicting macroscopic properties. Patch dynamics bridges the gap between the time and space scales at which the microscopic models operate, helping predict system-level behavior. View full abstract»

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  • High-precision floating-point arithmetic in scientific computation

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 54 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficient for most scientific applications, but a rapidly growing body of scientific computing applications requires a higher level of numeric precision. Software packages have yielded interesting scientific results that suggest numeric precision in scientific computations could be as important to program design as algorithms and data structures. View full abstract»

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  • Is quantum search practical?

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 62 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Gauging a quantum algorithm's practical significance requires weighing it against the best conventional techniques applied to useful instances of the same problem. The authors show that several commonly suggested applications of Grover's quantum search algorithm fail to offer computational improvements over the best conventional algorithms. View full abstract»

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  • The fast Fourier transform for experimentalists

    Publication Year: 2005
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In part one of this series, we discussed several basic properties of the fast Fourier transform (FFT). In addition to fundamental elements, we treated zero padding, aliasing, the relationship to a Fourier series, and ended with an introduction to windowing. In part II, we continue our discussion with a more general approach to spectrum estimation, including the periodogram, the autocorrelation fun... View full abstract»

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  • Finite differences and finite elements: getting to know you

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 72 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Numerical solution of differential equations relies on two main methods: finite differences and finite elements. In this paper, we explore the nuts and bolts of the two methods for a simple two-point boundary value problem. View full abstract»

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  • Maintaining correctness in scientific programs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 80 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Combine a high rate of change (which makes correctness hard to maintain) with an increased sensitivity to failure to maintain correctness and you have a big problem. Solving this problem must be the focus of our methodology. In this paper, the author describes the layered approach that he found to be the most successful in maintaining correctness in the face of rapid change. View full abstract»

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  • Molecular phylogenetic analyses and real-life data

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 86 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The construction of phylogenetic trees is an NP-hard problem because the number of possible trees increases exponentially with the number of DNA or protein sequences included in the analysis. The large amount of data and the task's complexity means that phylogenetic trees can't be interred without computational help. Since the 1960s, researchers have published numerous studies addressing the probl... View full abstract»

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  • Real-time natural hand gestures

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 92 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (752 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In human-computer interaction (HCI) applications, traditional devices, such as keyboard and mouse, can become cumbersome and unsuitable. Researchers consider the human hand to be one of the most promising natural HCI media; specifically, using hand gestures to input computer commands. Vision-based HCI hand-gesture analysis and recognition studies require large numbers of a variety of gestures as i... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computing in Science & Engineering presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
George K. Thiruvathukal
Loyola University