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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date April 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 30
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1 - c4
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  • IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering publication information

    Page(s): c2
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  • Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain

    Page(s): 557 - 565
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (666 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus. View full abstract»

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  • Encoding and decoding target locations with waves in the turtle visual cortex

    Page(s): 566 - 577
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (667 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Visual stimuli elicit waves of activity that propagate across the visual cortex of turtles. An earlier study showed that these waves encode information about the positions of stimuli in visual space. This paper addresses the question of how this information can be decoded from the waves. Windowing techniques were used to temporally localize information contained in the wave. Sliding encoding windows were used to represent waves of activity as low dimensional temporal strands in an appropriate space. Expanding detection window (EDW) or sliding detection window (SDW) techniques were combined with statistical hypothesis testing to discriminate input stimuli. Detection based on an EDW was more reliable than detection based on a SDW. Detection performance improved at a very early stage of the cortical response as the length of the detection window is increased. The property of intrinsic noise was explicitly considered. Assuming that the noise is colored provided a more reliable estimate than did the assumption of a white noise in the cortical output. View full abstract»

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  • Comparing generalized and phase synchronization in cardiovascular and cardiorespiratory signals

    Page(s): 578 - 583
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (345 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We made use of multivariate nonlinear analysis methods to study the interdependence between the cardiac interval variability and both the respiratory activity and the systolic pressure in rats. The study was carried out in basal conditions and after the application of different drugs affecting the cardiovascular system. The results showed that there are changes both in the extent and in the directionality of such interdependences because of the drugs. The inhibition of the NO and the parasympathetic blockade changed the cardiovascular coordination, with the latter one also modifying the interdependence between the cardiac interval and the respiratory signal. This suggests that the nonlinear approach might be very helpful to explore the interaction between subsystems of the cardiovascular control system. View full abstract»

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  • Mutual information function assesses autonomic information flow of heart rate dynamics at different time scales

    Page(s): 584 - 592
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (599 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The autonomic information flow (AIF) represents the complex communication within the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS). It can be assessed by the mutual information function (MIF) of heart rate fluctuations (HRF). The complexity of HRF is based on several interacting physiological mechanisms operating at different time scales. Therefore one prominent time scale for HRF complexity analysis is not given a priori. The MIF reflects the information flow at different time scales. This approach is defined and evaluated in the present paper. In order to aggregate relevant physiological time scales, the MIF of HRF obtained from eight adult Lewis rats during the awake state, under general anesthesia, with additional vagotomy, and additional beta1-adrenergic blockade are investigated. Physiologically relevant measures of the MIF were assessed with regard to the discrimination of these states. A simulation study of a periodically excited pendulum is performed to clarify the influence of the time scale of MIF in comparison to the Kolmogorov Sinai entropy (KSE) of that well defined system. The general relevance of the presented AIF approach was confirmed by comparing mutual information, approximate entropy, and sample entropy at their respective time scales. View full abstract»

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  • High-resolution analysis of ambulatory electrocardiograms to detect possible mechanisms of premature ventricular beats

    Page(s): 593 - 598
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (359 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    For generations of electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis, the presence of premature ventricular beats (PVBs) has been characterized as a common event in the ECG without regard to the mechanism which has caused the PVB in the first place. At best, the coupling interval with the preceding sinus beat may be noted. This viewpoint persisted throughout the era of automated ECG analysis, as well as influencing the treatment of more life threatening events by PVB suppression strategies alone. This study proposed three hypotheses which would link the PVB to a specific mechanism or milieu. Each of these hypotheses requires significant signal processing of the continuously recorded high resolution ECG. Data are presented which demonstrate that abnormal intra-QRS potentials may be linked to a reentrant mechanism for the PVBs and that many patients have significant changes in these potentials in the sinus beats preceding the PVB. Changes in the characteristics of the repolarization as measured in the T/U wave period were also observed and could be linked to triggered activity mechanism for some PVBs. Finally, the role of subclinical ST segment changes also indicates that low grade ischemia may play a role in modulating either PVB mechanism. The data generated by this study suggest that a new view toward PVB mechanism as measured by ECG characteristics may warrant a more rational approach to renewed interest identifying the malignant PVBs and their eventual clinical management. View full abstract»

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  • Methodological principles of T wave alternans analysis: a unified framework

    Page(s): 599 - 613
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (747 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Visible T wave alternans (TWA) in the electrocardiogram (ECG) had been regarded as an infrequent phenomenon during the first 80 years of electrocardiography. Nevertheless, computerized analysis changed this perception. In the last two decades, a variety of techniques for automatic TWA analysis have been proposed. These techniques have allowed researchers to detect nonvisible TWA in a wide variety of clinical and experimental conditions. Such studies have recently shown that TWA is related to cardiac instability and increased arrhythmogenicity. Comparison of TWA analysis methods is a difficult task due to the diversity of approaches. In this paper, we propose a unified framework which holds the existing methods. In the light of this framework, the methodological principles of the published TWA analysis schemes are compared and discussed. This framework may have an important role to develop new approaches to this problem. View full abstract»

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  • Automated estimation of the phase between thoracic and abdominal movement signals

    Page(s): 614 - 621
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (419 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a new procedure for the automated estimation of the phase relation between thoracic and abdominal breathing signals measured by inductance plethysmography (RIP). This estimation is achieved using linear filters, binary converters and an exclusive-or gate. The filters are designed offline from prior knowledge of the spectrum of subjects' respiration, reducing computational complexity and providing on-line processing capabilities. Some numerical results based on simulated time series and infant respiration data are provided, showing that the new method is less biased than the Pearson correlation method, commonly used for assessment of thoracoabdominal asynchrony. Our method offers further advantages: 1) it works with uncalibrated measurements; 2) it provides quantitative phase estimates with no need to estimate the underlying frequency of the breathing signals; 3) it does not require nonconvex optimization search algorithms; and 4) it is easy to implement and to automate. View full abstract»

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  • A technique to track individual motor unit action potentials in surface EMG by monitoring their conduction velocities and amplitudes

    Page(s): 622 - 629
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (581 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The speed of propagation of an action potential along a muscle fiber, its conduction velocity (CV), can be used as an indication of the physiological or pathological state of the muscle fiber membrane. The motor unit action potential (MUAP), the waveform resulting from the spatial and temporal summation of the individual muscle fiber action potentials of that motor unit (MU), propagates with a speed referred to as the motor unit conduction velocity (MUCV). This paper introduces a new algorithm, the MU tracking algorithm, which estimates MUCVs and MUAP amplitudes for individual MUs in a localized MU population using SEMG signals. By tracking these values across time, the electrical activity of the localized MU pool can be monitored. An assessment of the performance of the algorithm has been achieved using simulated SEMG signals. It is concluded that this analysis technique enhances the suitability of SEMG for clinical applications and points toward a future of noninvasive diagnosis and assessment of neuromuscular disorders. View full abstract»

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  • Quantifying errors in spectral estimates of HRV due to beat replacement and resampling

    Page(s): 630 - 638
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (410 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Spectral estimates of heart rate variability (HRV) often involve the use of techniques such as the fast Fourier transform (FFT), which require an evenly sampled time series. HRV is calculated from the variations in the beat-to-beat (RR) interval timing of the cardiac cycle which are inherently irregularly spaced in time. In order to produce an evenly sampled time series prior to FFT-based spectral estimation, linear or cubic spline resampling is usually employed. In this paper, by using a realistic artificial RR interval generator, interpolation and resampling is shown to result in consistent over-estimations of the power spectral density (PSD) compared with the theoretical solution. The Lomb-Scargle (LS) periodogram, a more appropriate spectral estimation technique for unevenly sampled time series that uses only the original data, is shown to provide a superior PSD estimate. Ectopy removal or replacement is shown to be essential regardless of the spectral estimation technique. Resampling and phantom beat replacement is shown to decrease the accuracy of PSD estimation, even at low levels of ectopy or artefact. A linear relationship between the frequency of ectopy/artefact and the error (mean and variance) of the PSD estimate is demonstrated. Comparisons of PSD estimation techniques performed on real RR interval data during minimally active segments (sleep) demonstrate that the LS periodogram provides a less noisy spectral estimate of HRV. View full abstract»

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  • Comparison of trend detection algorithms in the analysis of physiological time-series data

    Page(s): 639 - 651
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (922 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a comparative performance analysis of various trend detection methods developed using fuzzy logic, statistical, regression, and wavelet techniques. The main contribution of this paper is the introduction of a new method that uses noise rejection fuzzy clustering to enhance the performance of trend detection methodologies. Furthermore, another contribution of this work is a comparative investigation that produced systematic guidelines for the selection of a proper trend detection method for different application requirements. Examples of representative physiological variables considered in this paper to examine the trend detection algorithms are: 1) blood pressure signals (diastolic and systolic); and 2) heartbeat rate based on RR intervals of electrocardiography signal. Furthermore, synthetic physiological data intentionally contaminated with various types of real-life noise has been generated and used to test the performance of trend detection methods and develop noise-insensitive trend-detection algorithms. View full abstract»

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  • Elastic registration of biological images using vector-spline regularization

    Page(s): 652 - 663
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2659 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present an elastic registration algorithm for the alignment of biological images. Our method combines and extends some of the best techniques available in the context of medical imaging. We express the deformation field as a B-spline model, which allows us to deal with a rich variety of deformations. We solve the registration problem by minimizing a pixelwise mean-square distance measure between the target image and the warped source. The problem is further constrained by way of a vector-spline regularization which provides some control over two independent quantities that are intrinsic to the deformation: its divergence, and its curl. Our algorithm is also able to handle soft landmark constraints, which is particularly useful when parts of the images contain very little information or when its repartition is uneven. We provide an optimal analytical solution in the case when only landmarks and smoothness considerations are taken into account. We have applied our approach to perform the elastic registration of images such as electrophoretic gels and fly embryos. The validation of the results by experts has been favorable in all cases. View full abstract»

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  • Fluoroscopy-based 3-D reconstruction of femoral bone cement: a new approach for revision total hip replacement

    Page(s): 664 - 675
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2250 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In revision total hip replacement the removal of the distal femoral bone cement can be a time consuming and risky operation due to the difficulty in determining the three-dimensional (3-D) boundary of the cement. We present a new approach to reconstruct the bone cement volume by using just a small number of calibrated multiplanar X-ray images. The modular system design allows the surgeon to react intraoperatively to problems arising during the individual situation. When encountering problems during conventional cement removal, the system can be used on demand to acquire a few calibrated X-ray images. After a semi-automatic segmentation and 3-D reconstruction of the cement with a deformable model, the system guides the surgeon through a free-hand navigated or robot-assisted cement removal. The experimental evaluation using plastic test implants cemented into anatomic specimen of human femoral bone has shown the potential of this method with a maximal error of 1.2 mm (0.5 mm RMS) for the distal cement based on just 4-5 multiplanar X-ray images. A first test of the complete system, comparing the 3-D-reconstruction with a computed tompography data set, confirmed these results with a mean error about 1 mm. View full abstract»

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  • Automated extraction of temporal motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures based on adaptive block matching

    Page(s): 676 - 686
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1215 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an automated procedure developed to extract quantitative information from video recordings of neonatal seizures in the form of motor activity signals. This procedure relies on optical flow computation to select anatomical sites located on the infants' body parts. Motor activity signals are extracted by tracking selected anatomical sites during the seizure using adaptive block matching. A block of pixels is tracked throughout a sequence of frames by searching for the most similar block of pixels in subsequent frames; this search is facilitated by employing various update strategies to account for the changing appearance of the block. The proposed procedure is used to extract temporal motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures and other events not associated with seizures. View full abstract»

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  • A system-on-chip digital pH meter for use in a wireless diagnostic capsule

    Page(s): 687 - 694
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (590 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a system-on-chip digital pH meter, for use in a wireless capsule application. The system is organized around an 8-bit microcontroller, designed to be functionally identical to the Motorola 6805. The analog subsystem contains a floating-electrode ISFET, which is fully compatible with a commercial CMOS process. On-chip programmable voltage references and multiplexors permit flexibility with the minimum of external connections. The chip is designed in a modular fashion to facilitate verification and component re-use. The single-chip pH meter can be directly connected to a personal computer, and gives a response of 37 bits/pH, within an operating range of 7 pH units. View full abstract»

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  • Temperature dependence of tissue impedivity in electrical impedance tomography of cryosurgery

    Page(s): 695 - 701
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (869 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The temperature-dependent impedivity of rat liver, transverse abdominal muscle and full skin was determined in vitro as a function of frequency across the temperature range 5°C to 37°C and from 100 Hz to 10 kHz. This study was motivated by an increasing interest in using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for imaging of cryosurgery and a lack of applicable data in the hypothermic range. Using a controlled-temperature impedance analyzer, it was found that as the temperature is reduced the resulting increase in tissue impedivity is more pronounced at low frequencies and that the beta dispersion, resulting from cell membrane polarization, shifts to lower frequencies. With these new data a simple case study of EIT of liver cryosurgery was examined, using a finite-element model incorporating the Pennes bio-heat equation, to determine the impact of this behavior on imaging accuracy. Overestimation of the ice-front position was found to occur if the EIT system ignored the effects of the low-temperature zone surrounding the frozen tissue. This error decreases with increasing blood perfusion and with higher measurement frequencies. View full abstract»

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  • Effects of radiofrequency energy on human chondromalacic cartilage: an assessment of insulation material properties

    Page(s): 702 - 710
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4043 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The objective of this study was to establish guidelines for the selection of an insulation material used to surround the electrode of radiofrequency energy (RFE) probes used for thermal chondroplasty. These guidelines were established by identifying which insulation materials resulted in the least amount of chondrocyte death while smoothing the surface of chondromalacic cartilage. RFE causes electrolyte oscillation and molecular friction in the tissue to heat it and subsequently smooth the surface. Material properties investigated included the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), thermal conductivity (TC), and volume resistivity (VR). Fresh human chondromalacic cartilage samples of Outerbridge grades II and III were obtained from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Stiffness measurements were taken pretreatment and posttreatment. RFE was applied to a 1-cm2 area for 15 s in a paintbrush treatment pattern. The insulation materials evaluated included Macor® (↓CTE,↓TC,?VR; in relation to CTE=10×10-6/° C @ 20°C, TC=3 W/mK, VR=1×1014 ohm*cm), zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) and 99.5% alumina (↓CTE,?TC,?VR), aluminum nitride (↓CTE,?TC,↓VR), Teflon® (PTFE) (?CTE,↓TC,?VR), partially stabilized zirconia (YTZP) (↓CTE,↓TC,↓VR), and Ultem® (?CTE,↓TC,↓VR). There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment stiffness of the cartilage for any material investigated. Subjectively scored scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed that the surfaces of all samples treated with RFE were relatively smooth with melted fronds. Prototype probes made with Macor®, 99.5% alumina, and ZTA had TC≤30 W/mol*K and resulted in a mean of 35% less cell death (176±56 μm, 130±48 μm, and 114±33μm, respectively) than aluminum nitride, PTFE, and YTZP (246±68 μm, 231±108 μm, and 195±89 μm, respectively). Macor®, 99.5% alumina, and ZTA prototype probes all had VR≥1×1014 ohm*cm and resulted in a mean 37% less cell death th- an aluminum nitride or YTZP. There was no apparent relationship between CTE and the depth of chondrocyte death. View full abstract»

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  • An ultra-low-power programmable analog bionic ear processor

    Page(s): 711 - 727
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3461 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report a programmable analog bionic ear (cochlear implant) processor in a 1.5-μm BiCMOS technology with a power consumption of 211 μW and 77-dB dynamic range of operation. The 9.58 mm×9.23 mm processor chip runs on a 2.8 V supply and has a power consumption that is lower than state-of-the-art analog-to-digital (A/D)-then-DSP designs by a factor of 25. It is suitable for use in fully implanted cochlear-implant systems of the future which require decades of operation on a 100-mAh rechargeable battery with a finite number of charge-discharge cycles. It may also be used as an ultra-low-power spectrum-analysis front end in portable speech-recognition systems. The power consumption of the processor includes the 100 μW power consumption of a JFET-buffered electret microphone and an associated on-chip microphone front end. An automatic gain control circuit compresses the 77-dB input dynamic range into a narrower internal dynamic range (IDR) of 57 dB at which each of the 16 spectral channels of the processor operate. The output bits of the processor are scanned and reported off chip in a format suitable for continuous-interleaved-sampling stimulation of electrodes. Power-supply-immune biasing circuits ensure robust operation of the processor in the high-RF-noise environment typical of cochlear implant systems. View full abstract»

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  • Objective measurement of tactile mislocalization

    Page(s): 728 - 735
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (884 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Stimulating the skin with intensities close to the sensory threshold causes erroneous localization of the site of stimulation. Previous studies using manual methods for applying faint tactile stimuli have shown that localization errors obey a somatotopic principle in which tactile stimuli are preferentially mislocalized to sites adjacent to the stimulated skin region. However, manual testing of mislocalization is time consuming and only partially objective because results depend on the skills of the tester. To improve the testing procedure, an automated apparatus was developed. The procedure adjusted stimulus intensity adaptively during testing to remain near the individual subject's sensory threshold, so that mislocalizations occurred often enough to assess somatotopic organization. The new method was applied to 12 healthy subjects. In each subject, the five digits of the right hand were stimulated singly in random order. Localization errors were distributed preferentially to fingers close to the stimulated finger rather than to distant fingers. The profile of mislocalization differed significantly from that expected on the basis of response bias or guessing behavior. The present results replicate previous findings obtained for manual testing with improved sensitivity and indicate that the new technique is a useful tool for the study of somatosensory processing on a perceptual level. View full abstract»

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  • Optimal electrical stimulation modality for cortical esophageal evoked potentials: transmural or intraesophageal?

    Page(s): 736 - 739
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (133 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Esophageal electrical stimulation using short and a relatively small number of (200 μs, 0.2 Hz, n=25) electrical pulses generates a characteristic and well defined cortical evoked potential response (EP). There are two methods of stimulation: either through intraesophageal electrodes or with transmural electrodes. The objective of this paper is to compare EP response, sensations and heart rate variability power spectra elicited by both stimulation modalities in healthy volunteers. Our results suggest that transmural stimulation is more accurately perceived and at lower intensities, produces more reproducible peaks of higher amplitude than during intraesophageal stimulation. During either mode of esophageal stimulation, power within the high-frequency component of the heart rate variability power spectrum is enhanced. View full abstract»

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  • Energy-optimal electrical excitation of nerve fibers

    Page(s): 740 - 743
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (149 KB)  

    We derive, based on an analytical nerve membrane model and optimal control theory of dynamical systems, an energy-optimal stimulation current waveform for electrical excitation of nerve fibers. Optimal stimulation waveforms for nonleaky and leaky membranes are calculated. The case with a leaky membrane is a realistic case. Finally, we compare the waveforms and energies necessary for excitation of a leaky membrane in the case where the stimulation waveform is a square-wave current pulse, and in the case of energy-optimal stimulation. The optimal stimulation waveform is an exponentially rising waveform and necessitates considerably less energy to excite the nerve than a square-wave pulse (especially true for larger pulse durations). The described theoretical results can lead to drastically increased battery lifetime and/or decreased energy transmission requirements for implanted biomedical systems. View full abstract»

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  • Noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease by arterio-oscillography

    Page(s): 743 - 747
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) causes oscillations in peripheral arteries. Oscillations of the walls of the brachial arteries of 51 patients were recorded [together with the electrocardiogram (ECG)] by an accelerometer at different cuff pressures. By analyzing the energy of the oscillations in the 30-250 Hz band, 16 of 22 patients with CAD and 26 of 29 non-CAD subjects were classified correctly, independent of the ECG, and with no effect of heart murmurs. View full abstract»

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  • Improving the accuracy and reliability of motion tracking methods used for extracting temporal motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures

    Page(s): 747 - 749
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (389 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an approach for improving the accuracy and reliability of motion tracking methods developed for video based on block motion models. This approach estimates the displacement of a block of pixels between two successive frames by minimizing an error function defined in terms of the pixel intensities at these frames. The minimization problem is made analytically tractable by approximating the error function using a second-order Taylor expansion. The improved reliability of the proposed method is illustrated by its application in the extraction of temporal motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures. View full abstract»

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  • Comments on "Accuracy limitations of chronaxie Values"

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    Some additions/corrections are offered to Geddes, 2004. Stimulation is initiated by the second spatial derivative of the voltage along the nerve (activating function) rather than current density. Chronaxie values change with distance from the electrode. Anodic stimulation can excite via anodic break excitation, or via virtual cathodes around the anode. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Bin He
Department of Biomedical Engineering