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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date March-April 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Masthead

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Digital Art Revolution

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 4 - 5
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Applications of computers to dance

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 6 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1216 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As computer technology has developed and become less expensive, many artists have found ways to use it to enhance their performances with interactive multimedia. This has included incorporating computer-generated images and sound with live dance performance and using sensors that let the live dancers' movements control imagery, sound, and a wide variety of special effects. This overview describes some of the current applications of computer graphics to dance including visualizing choreography, composing, editing and animating dance notation, and enhancing live performance. View full abstract»

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  • Tangible augmented interfaces for structural molecular biology

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 13 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1876 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the prevalence of structural and genomic data, molecular biology has become a human-guided, computer-assisted endeavor. The computer assists the essential human function in two ways: For exploring scientific data, it searches for and tests scientific hypotheses. For collaborating between two or more scientists, it shares knowledge and expertise. As databases grow, as structure and process models become more complex, and as software methods become more diverse, access and manipulation of digital information is increasingly a critical issue for research and collaboration in molecular biology. We have developed an augmented reality (AR) system that lets virtual 3D representations of molecular structures and properties be overlaid on autofabricated models of the molecules. While using our tangible interaction environment, users can intuitively manipulate molecular models and interactions, easily change the representation shown, and access information about molecular properties. View full abstract»

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  • Artistic collaboration in designing VR visualizations

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 18 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1832 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article describes one of the recent major collaborative efforts, a class on designing VR scientific visualizations that was co-taught with professors and students from Brown University's computer science department and the Rhode Island School of Design's (RISD's) illustration department. We discuss here the experiences that led us to this conclusion; along with some of the tools we have developed to facilitate working with artists. Many of the experiences and conclusions relayed here are the results of this class. We then discuss three important themes that we derived from our experiences, which are all motivated by a desire to better facilitate artistic collaborations. View full abstract»

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  • Automated eye motion using texture synthesis

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 24 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Modeling human eyes requires special care. The goal of this paper is to synthesize realistic eye-gaze and blink motion, accounting for any possible correlations between the two. The technique adopts a data-driven texture synthesis approach to the problem of synthesizing realistic eye motion. The basic assumption is that eye gaze probably has some connection with eyelid motion, as well as with head motion and speech. But the connection is not strictly deterministic and would be difficult to characterize explicitly. A major advantage of the data-driven approach is that the investigator does not need to determine whether these apparent correlations actually exist. If the correlations occur in the data, the synthesis (properly applied) will reproduce them. View full abstract»

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  • A novel Monte Carlo noise reduction operator

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 31 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (920 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Monte Carlo noise appears as outliers and as interpixel incoherence in a typical image rendered at low sampling density. Unfortunately, none of the previous approaches can reduce both types of noise in a unified way. In this article, we propose such a unified Monte Carlo noise reduction approach using bilateral filtering. We extended the standard bilateral filtering method and built a new local adaptive noise reduction kernel. The new operator suppresses the outliers and interpixel incoherence in a noniterative way. View full abstract»

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  • Bounded blending for function-based shape modeling

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 36 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (773 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    New analytical formulations of bounded blending operations can enhance function-based constructive shape modeling. In this article, we introduce bounded-blending operations that we define using R-functions and displacement functions with the localized area of influence. We define the shape and location of the blend by control points on the surfaces of two solids or by an additional bounding solid. We can apply our proposed blending using a bounding solid to a single selected edge or vertex. We also introduce new multiple blends and a partial edge blend. Our description supports set-theoretic operations on blends and blends on blends - that is, recursive blends. In this sense, our proposed operations could replace pure set-theoretic operations in the construction of a solid without rebuilding the entire construction tree data structure. Our proposed blending method can have application in interactive design. View full abstract»

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  • A meshing scheme for efficient hardware implementation of butterfly subdivision using displacement mapping

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 46 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (459 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Displacement mapping is an effective technique for encoding the high levels of detail of surface models using coarse triangle meshes and displacement maps. These maps are 2D representations containing the distances between the coarse mesh and the surface to represent. Displacement maps have been used in many applications such as ray tracing, image warping, and volume rendering. In this article, we propose modifications to our previous grouping strategy, a new subdivision strategy based on the Modified Butterfly algorithm and new heuristics for the adaptive subdivision procedure, and, finally, the corresponding modifications on our hardware proposal. A meshing scheme and an adaptive subdivision strategy based on displacement mapping reduce the bottleneck between the CPU and graphics pipeline common in high-performance graphics systems. View full abstract»

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  • Web-based shape modeling with HyperFun

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 60 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article, we have developed an open system architecture and Web-based shape-modeling applications using HyperFun, a high-level programming language for specifying implicit surfaces and FRep objects. We based our system on empirical modeling principles to allow for implementation of realistic behavior of shape models situated in multiagent environments, providing open-ended exploration and experimentation with shared models. Shape modeling systems based on HyperFun modeling language treat Internet-based shape modeling as a resource and let users collaborate in shape development. View full abstract»

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  • Jabiru: harnessing Java 3D behaviors for device and display portability

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 70 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1243 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The aim of this paper is to use the Java 3D ConfiguredUniverse utilities to create a set of behaviors that we can integrate into existing Java 3D programs, as long as these programs use the ConfiguredUniverse. We call this behavior package Jabiru (Java 3D Application Behavior Immersive Virtual Reality Utilities). The Jabiru set of behaviors, accessible from a master menu, facilitates moving Java 3D applications originally created for desktop environments to immersive VR environments and vice versa. Jabiru also provides a six-degrees-of-freedom (6DOF) device emulator for a conventional mouse, meant to facilitate offsite testing of immersive VR behaviors on a desktop. The main focus of our work with a CAVE is in relation to bioinformatics, which has embraced Java and Java 3D as one of the choice programming environments. By creating this package, we help bring 3D graphics to both the bioinformatics community and the casual Java 3D developer or user. We discuss the design and implementation of Jabiru. View full abstract»

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  • Ten CAD challenges

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 81 - 92
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2097 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We discuss the significant technical challenges facing the CAD industry and research community and present an approach to address these issues. The key component of all CAD applications is the end user. Users' success or failure in interacting with CAD products ultimately governs the success of the products themselves. We extend the meaning of interactive techniques for this article to include more than low-level input device, display, and human factor issues. We deliberately include the way users work with applications to accomplish a work task. Using this extension we define three difficult challenges with interactive techniques: geometry shape control; interoperability across CAD, CAM, and CAE applications; and automatically morphing geometry in a meaningful way during design optimization. View full abstract»

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  • Deriving linear transformations in 3D using quaternion algebra

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 93 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (382 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We propose a method for delivering linear transformation in the two parallel projections that works well with quaternion techniques. The article also presents a completed vector method to derive a linear transformation of the two kinds of parallel projections. Here, we propose a novel method that can achieve a unified framework based on quaternion techniques. View full abstract»

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  • Speed Limit 55 [computer graphics]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 96 - 106
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2895 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Over the years Andrew Glassner had several topics that he wanted to write about, but haven't gotten around to. So for his parting column, he presents some of his favorite computer graphics topics that never became columns, in the hope that one or more of them might inspire your own investigations. The areas discussed are: sundial simulation and rendering; animal vision; mapping systems; show coherence; color skywriting; weather based graphical art; music; and pixels as numbers. View full abstract»

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  • New Products

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 107 - 108
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Advertiser/Product Index

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c3
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa