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Parallel and Distributed Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date April 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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  • [Inside front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c2
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  • Dynamic load balancing and efficient load estimators for asynchronous iterative algorithms

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 289 - 299
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a previous paper, we have shown the very high power of asynchronism for parallel iterative algorithms in a global context of grid computing. In this article, we study the interest of coupling load balancing with asynchronism in such algorithms. After proposing a noncentralized version of dynamic load balancing which is best suited to asynchronism, we verify its efficiency by some experiments on a general partial differential equation (PDE) problem. Finally, we give some general conditions for the use of load balancing to obtain good results with this kind of algorithm and discuss the choice of the residual as an efficient load estimator. View full abstract»

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  • Pipelining broadcasts on heterogeneous platforms

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 300 - 313
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1064 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we consider the communications involved by the execution of a complex application, deployed on a heterogeneous platform. Such applications extensively use macrocommunication schemes, for example, to broadcast data items. Rather than aiming at minimizing the execution time of a single broadcast, we focus on the steady-state operation. We assume that there is a large number of messages to be broadcast in pipeline fashion, and we aim at maximizing the throughput, i.e., the (rational) number of messages which can be broadcast every time-step. We target heterogeneous platforms, modeled by a graph where resources have different communication and computation speeds. Achieving the best throughput may well require that the target platform is used in totality: we show that neither spanning trees nor DAGs are as powerful as general graphs. We show how to compute the best throughput using linear programming, and how to exhibit a periodic schedule, first when restricting to a DAG, and then when using a general graph. The polynomial compactness of the description comes from the decomposition of the schedule into several broadcast trees that are used concurrently to reach the best throughput. It is important to point out that a concrete scheduling algorithm based upon the steady-state operation is asymptotically optimal, in the class of all possible schedules (not only periodic solutions). View full abstract»

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  • Diagnosabilities of regular networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 314 - 323
    Cited by:  Papers (24)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (736 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we study diagnosabilities of multiprocessor systems under two diagnosis models: the PMC model and the comparison model. In each model, we further consider two different diagnosis strategies: the precise diagnosis strategy proposed by Preparata et al. and the pessimistic diagnosis strategy proposed by Friedman. The main result of this paper is to determine diagnosabilities of regular networks with certain conditions, which include several widely used multiprocessor systems such as variants of hypercubes and many others. View full abstract»

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  • Bandwidth optimization for Internet traffic in generalized processor sharing servers

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 324 - 334
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (928 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Bandwidth optimization is considered when several classes of Internet traffic are served in generalized processor sharing (GPS) servers. Internet traffic shows self-similar patterns that make it difficult to obtain analytical performance in GPS. Thus, for performance estimation of different classes of traffic, we use fluid simulation techniques that can reduce the simulation complexity, compared to packet-level simulation. Using the relationship between the guaranteed bandwidth vector and the corresponding performance, we propose a bandwidth optimization problem to minimize the total bandwidth such that performance requirements are satisfied. We use an exterior penalty function method to solve the optimization problem. However, a penalized objective function may have local minimum which is not a global minimum. Thus, we propose a new methodology to circumvent the limitation of the exterior penalty function method. View full abstract»

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  • Routing algorithms on the bus-based hypercube network

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 335 - 348
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (816 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we study the properties of the bus-based hypercube, denoted as U(n,b), which is a kind of multiple-bus networks (MBN). U(n,b) consists of 2n processors and 2b buses, where 0 ≤ b ≤ n - 1, and each processor is connected to either (b+2)/2 or (b+1)/2 buses. We show that the diameter of U(n,b) is (b-1)/2 if b ≥ 2. We also present an algorithm to select the best neighbor processor via which we can obtain one shortest routing path. In U(n,b), we show that if there exist some faults, the fault diameter DF(n,b,f) ≤ b+1, where f is the sum of bus faults and processor faults and 0 ≤ f ≤ (b+3)/2. Furthermore, we also show that the bus fault diameter DB(n,b,f) ≤ b/-2 - 3, where 0 ≤ f ≤ (b-1)/2 and f is the number of bus faults. These results improve significantly the previous result that DB(n,b,f) ≤ b - 2f + 1, where f is the number of bus faults. View full abstract»

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  • Efficient, proximity-aware load balancing for DHT-based P2P systems

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 349 - 361
    Cited by:  Papers (69)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (848 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many solutions have been proposed to tackle the load balancing issue in DHT-based P2P systems. However, all these solutions either ignore the heterogeneity nature of the system, or reassign loads among nodes without considering proximity relationships, or both. In this paper, we present an efficient, proximity-aware load balancing scheme by using the concept of virtual servers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to use proximity information in load balancing. In particular, our main contributions are: 1) relying on a self-organized, fully distributed k-ary tree structure constructed on top of a DHT, load balance is achieved by aligning those two skews in load distribution and node capacity inherent in P2P systems - that is, have higher capacity nodes carry more loads; 2) proximity information is used to guide virtual server reassignments such that virtual servers are reassigned and transferred between physically close heavily loaded nodes and lightly loaded nodes, thereby minimizing the load movement cost and allowing load balancing to perform efficiently; and 3) our simulations show that our proximity-aware load balancing scheme reduces the load movement cost by 11-65 percent for all the combinations of two representative network topologies, two node capacity profiles, and two load distributions of virtual servers. Moreover, we achieve virtual server reassignments in O(log N) time. View full abstract»

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  • Improving source routing reliability in mobile ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 362 - 373
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (952 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we propose a novel on-demand routing protocol called backup source routing (BSR) to establish and maintain backup routes that can be utilized after the primary path breaks. The key advantage of BSR is the reduction of the frequency of route discovery flooding, which is recognized as a major overhead in on-demand protocols. We define a new routing metric, called the route reliability, and use it to provide the basis for the backup path selection. We use a heuristic cost function to develop an analytical model and an approximation method to measure this metric. Various algorithms for our BSR protocol in the route discovery phase and route maintenance phase have been designed based on this cost function. Extensive simulations demonstrated that our routing strategy has two interesting features: 1) in less stressful situations of lower mobility, BSR has similar performance to DSR, 2) in more challenging situations of high mobility, BSR can improve the performance significantly. View full abstract»

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  • Shared data allocation in a mobile computing system: exploring local and global optimization

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 374 - 384
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1096 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we devise data allocation algorithms that can utilize the knowledge of user moving patterns for proper allocation of shared data in a mobile computing system. By employing the data allocation algorithms devised, the occurrences of costly remote accesses can be minimized and the performance of a mobile computing system is thus improved. The data allocation algorithms for shared data, which are able to achieve local optimization and global optimization, are developed. Local optimization refers to the optimization that the likelihood of local data access by an individual mobile user is maximized whereas global optimization refers to the optimization that the likelihood of local data access by all mobile users is maximized. Specifically, by exploring the features of local optimization and global optimization, we devise algorithm SD-local and algorithm SD-global to achieve local optimization and global optimization, respectively. In general, the mobile users are divided into two types, namely, frequently moving users and infrequently moving users. A measurement, called closeness measure which corresponds to the amount of the intersection between the set of frequently moving user patterns and that of infrequently moving user patterns, is derived to assess the quality of solutions provided by SD-local and SD-global. Performance of these data allocation algorithms is comparatively analyzed. From the analysis of SD-local and SD-global, it is shown that SD-local favors infrequently moving users whereas SD-global is good for frequently moving users. The simulation results show that the knowledge obtained from the user moving patterns is very important in devising effective data allocation algorithms which can lead to prominent performance improvement in a mobile computing system. View full abstract»

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  • TPDS Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems (TPDS) is published monthly. It publishes a range of papers, comments on previously published papers, and survey articles that deal with the parallel and distributed systems research areas of current importance to our readers.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Bader
College of Computing
Georgia Institute of Technology