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Computing in Science & Engineering

Issue 2 • March-April 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Staking New Ground

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):3 - 4
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In the last issue, I outlined my development priorities for moving CiSE to the next level--community, content, and approach. In this message, I want to describe our first steps on the way forward along each of these paths. View full abstract»

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  • Digital detectives reveal art forgeries

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):5 - 8
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    A computer scientist practices a new kind of forensics: a statistical technique that gauges whether a photograph is computer generated (CG), or if a work of art is a forgery. So far, his computer algorithms have correctly identified five forgeries among 13 artists' drawings and matched some human experts' theories on the origins of a Renaissance oil painting. The detective saw visual elements in a... View full abstract»

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  • Reviews of Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab: Coming Soon to a Publication Near You

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):9 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In our introductory article to our upcoming review series on Maple, Mathematica, and Matlab, we asked for feedback. The letters to the editor we subsequently received deliver two messages: first, that this review series will serve a real need, and second, that we must be thorough in our treatment of each product. We didn't intend the introductory article to be an in-depth account in any sense. Ins... View full abstract»

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  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Cluster Computing

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):11 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    What is cluster computing? In a nutshell, it involves the use of a network of computing resources to provide a comparatively economical package with capabilities once reserved for supercomputers. In this issue, we look at certain applications of cluster computing to problem solving. As the Beowulf project and clustering revolution celebrate more than 10 years in existence, it's interesting to see ... View full abstract»

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  • Configuration and performance of a Beowulf cluster for large-scale scientific simulations

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):14 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1008 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    To achieve optimal performance on a Beowulf cluster for large-scale scientific simulations, it's necessary to combine the right numerical method with its efficient implementation to exploit the cluster's critical high-performance components. This process is demonstrated using a simple but prototypical problem of solving a time-dependent partial differential equation. Beowulf clusters in virtually ... View full abstract»

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  • Plug-and-play cluster computing: high-performance computing for the mainstream

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):27 - 33
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1008 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    To achieve accessible computational power for their research goals, the authors developed the tools to build easy-to-use, numerically intensive parallel computing clusters using the Macintosh platform. Their approach enables the user, without expertise in the operating system, to develop and run parallel code efficiently, maximizing the advancement of scientific research. Accessible computing powe... View full abstract»

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  • Cluster computing with Java

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):34 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Java could be a new lingua franca for uniting disparate computing worlds. In this article, the authors explore two approaches for Java's support of cluster computing - as single and multiple virtual machines - and evaluate the performance of the two approaches via a set of benchmark applications. Java has emerged as a possible solution to unite Web, cluster, multiprocessor, and uniprocessor comput... View full abstract»

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  • Resource-aware scientific computation on a heterogeneous cluster

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):40 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Although researchers can develop software on small, local clusters and move it later to larger clusters and supercomputers, the software must run efficiently in both environments. Two efforts aim to improve the efficiency of scientific computation on clusters through resource-aware dynamic load balancing. The popularity of cost-effective clusters built from commodity hardware has opened up a new p... View full abstract»

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  • High-performance computing: clusters, constellations, MPPs, and future directions

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):51 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (24)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In a recent paper, Gordon Bell and Jim Gray (2002) put forth a view of the past, present, and future of high-performance computing (HPC) that is both insightful and thought provoking. Identifying key trends with a grace and candor rarely encountered in a single work, the authors describe an evolutionary past drawn from their vast experience and project an enticing and compelling vision of HPC's fu... View full abstract»

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  • Blind deconvolution: a matter of norm

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):60 - 62
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    We continue the spectroscopy problem from the last issue, trying to reconstruct a true spectrum from an observed one. Again, we'll use blind deconvolution, but this time we'll impose some constraints on the error matrix E, leading to a more difficult problem to solve but often a more useful reconstruction. View full abstract»

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  • Global e-science collaboration

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):67 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1544 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Today's e-science, with its extreme-scale scientific applications, marks a turning point for high-end requirements on the compute infrastructure and, in particular, on optical networking resources. Although ongoing research efforts are aimed at exploiting the vast bandwidth of fiber-optic networks to both interconnect resources and enable high-performance applications, challenges continue to arise... View full abstract»

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  • A virtual laboratory for temporal bone microanatomy

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):75 - 79
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1856 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Located in the lateral cranial base, the temporal bone is one of the human body's most complicated parts. It contains many tiny, delicate, and detailed anatomical structures, including many irregular orifices, antra (cavities), canals, and fissures. Crucial nerves, blood vessels, and auditory and vestibular organs coexist in this dense bone structure in a complex 3D configuration, causing medical ... View full abstract»

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  • The fast Fourier transform for experimentalists. Part I. Concepts

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):80 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The discrete Fourier transform (DFT) provides a means for transforming data sampled in the time domain to an expression of this data in the frequency domain. The inverse transform reverses the process, converting frequency data into time-domain data. Such transformations can be applied in a wide variety of fields, from geophysics to astronomy, from the analysis of sound signals to CO2 c... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

CS&E magazine emphasizes articles that help define the field as the interface among the applications (in science and engineering), algorithms (numerical and symbolic), system software, and computer architecture.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
George K. Thiruvathukal
Loyola University