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Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1  Part 2 • Date Feb. 2005

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science publication information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c2
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  • Effect of secondary electron emission on surface wave propagation

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 105 - 110
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study aims to contribute to the analysis of the mechanisms of surface-wave-energy absorption. The discussion is based on a consideration of emissive processes from dielectric surface, which is in contact with collisional nonisothermal plasma, and on an analysis of secondary electron motion in the wave-fields. Through electron acceleration due to the action of ponderomotive force, the secondary emission affects the wave behavior. The conditions of the existence of secondary-emission-induced absorption of the wave are analyzed and its role in maintenance of wave-produced gas discharges, as one of its applications, is discussed as well. View full abstract»

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  • Numerical computation of dispersion curves for symmetric and asymmetric modes in an arbitrary cylindrical metal SWS

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 111 - 118
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (456 KB)  

    A method of quickly and accurately getting the dispersion curves for both symmetric and asymmetric modes in arbitrary slow-wave structures is investigated analytically. A universal dispersion equation is derived by utilizing the field theory and expressing the slow-wave structure's profile in a finite Fourier series. In principle, this method can be applied to arbitrary axisymmetric profiles. As examples, numerical results for three typical slow-wave structures (namely, rippled-wall, disk-loaded, and modified disk-loaded structures) are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Resonant reradiation of electromagnetic waves by thin conductors with transverse gaps

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 119 - 128
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Transverse gaps are introduced in thin-wire conductors to extend the region of phase variations of currents that are induced on them by an incident electromagnetic wave. Periodically placed gaps lead to qualitative changes in the properties of reradiated waves, such as the appearance of resonances corresponding to total reflection and total transmission of the incident wave. It is shown that total reflection occurs in a narrow band and depends very weakly on the incident angle of the illuminating radiation. This idea leads to novel filters and switches, whose operation is practically independent of the structure of the incident wave. Total resonant reflection can occur for conductors with high optical transparency, a property that is useful for various microwave diagnostic devices. Because of the increased radiation resistance of such structures, the resonant effects under consideration depend weakly on conductivity. For gratings made using these conductors with gaps stacked above a metal ground plane, it is possible to controllably collimate the rays. Expansion of the scattered fields in terms of Rayleigh's series, together with Poisson's summation formula, are used for numerical simulations of such structures. View full abstract»

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  • Nonthermal plasma applications to the environment: gaseous electronics and power conditioning

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 129 - 137
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (632 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    For nearly two decades, interest in gas-phase pollution control has greatly increased, arising from a greater respect for the environment, more attention to the effects of pollution, and a larger body of regulations and laws. Nonthermal plasma (NTP) technology shows promise for destroying pollutants in gas streams and cleaning contaminated surfaces, using plasma-generated reactive species (e.g., free radicals). NTPs can generate both oxidative and reductive radicals, showing promise for treating a variety of pollutants, sometimes simultaneously decomposing multiple species. In this paper, some applications of NTP processing for the environment, associated discharge physics and plasma chemistry, and power conditioning systems for driving the NTP reactors will be discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PEMOCVD) of catalytic coatings for fuel cell reformers

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 138 - 146
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1496 KB)  

    Fuel cells have the potential to solve several major challenges in the global energy economy: dependence on petroleum imports, degradation of air quality, and greenhouse gas emissions. Using catalyst-based reformer technology, hydrogen for fuel cells can be derived from infrastructure fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and natural gas. Platinum is one catalyst that is known to be very effective in hydrogen reformers. Reformer size can be reduced when there is more efficient catalyst loading onto the substrate. In this experimental work, platinum was loaded onto γ-alumina coated substrates by plasma-polymerization followed by heat treatment. Vapor from a platinum-containing organic precursor was converted to plasma and deposited onto the substrate. The plasma-polymerized film was then calcined to drive off organic material, leaving behind a catalyst-loaded substrate. The plasma-polymerized organic film and the final heat-treated catalyst-loaded substrate surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and impedance spectroscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to detect the presence of the catalyst on the substrate. View full abstract»

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  • Improvement of the efficiency of plasma display panels by combining waveform and cell geometry design

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 147 - 156
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (648 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent simulation model is used to investigate the effect of several different sustaining voltage waveforms on the luminous efficiency of plasma display panel (PDP) cells. We first show that such a model can reproduce all the major trends of experimental display measurements concerning the effect of waveform on PDP efficiency. We then use this model to put forth new high-efficiency PDP designs. A new sustaining waveform combining assistant voltage pulses with asymmetric pulse driving results in ∼25% maximum increase in efficiency within the voltage margin of the cell. A new plasma display using combined waveform and electrode designs is determined to have a maximum increase in efficiency of ∼40%. View full abstract»

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  • Decomposition of volatile organic compounds in plasma-catalytic system

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 157 - 161
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A plasma-catalytic combined reactor system was used to decompose volatile organic compounds. Metal oxide catalysts, as well as Pt-based catalyst, were employed in the studies. The plasma treatment alone leads to the formation of high concentration of byproducts. A Pt-based catalyst, combined with plasma reactor, was helpful in minimizing the byproduct formation. The plasma reactor significantly enhances the catalytic performance. Plasma reactor, combined with Pt-based catalyst, removed more than 90% of toluene. The Pt-based catalyst completely removed the CO produced by plasma reactor. In order to determine the mechanism of the plasma treatment, the plasma reactor was replaced by ozone reactor and the results were compared with plasma-catalytic reactor. It was found that ozone plays a significant role in enhancing the catalytic activity. View full abstract»

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  • Case studies on temperature-dependent Characteristics in AC PDPs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 162 - 169
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (960 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The temperature-dependent characteristics of ac plasma display panels (PDPs) are investigated, based on various case studies using a conventional driving scheme with reset pulses. Though the main factor of the thermal effects is caused by strong sustain discharges, it is not only caused by the panel characteristics, but also by the temperature-dependent characteristics of the driving system. One important thermal effect is a decreased breakdown voltage due to an increase in the panel temperature. Therefore, these results may be helpful in solving image-sticking and temperature-related phenomena. View full abstract»

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  • RF plasma conditions for growth of carbon nanostructures

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 170 - 175
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (800 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As the physical limits of silicon-based microelectronics are reached, a need for new materials is required in order to continually improve processor speed. Carbon nanotubes have been suggested as a material to fill in where silicon technology leaves off, due to their small dimensions and unique metallic and semiconductor properties. In order to better understand the conditions in which carbon nanostructures are formed, a detailed plasma analysis has been performed on a gaseous electronics conference (GEC) plasma chamber. This analysis includes plasma composition, rotational temperatures, and spatially resolved hydrogen actinometry during carbon nanostructure growth. View full abstract»

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  • Space and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy in TEA-CO2 laser ablation of polymers and graphite

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 176 - 182
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (680 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The luminous plumes from the TEA-CO2 laser ablation of polymethylmethacrylate, polyimide, polyethylene terepthalate, and graphite in helium were characterized by using gated optical emission spectroscopy that measured the spatial-temporal distribution of singly ionized carbon species, and also by streak photography that examined the dynamics of the propagation of the luminous plumes. The plume splitting was implicated by the fast and slow components of plume species in curve-fitting their spatial-temporal distribution with the shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function. The best-fit velocities of the fast components were confirmed by the streak photographs. View full abstract»

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  • Two- and three-wire loads for large current machines

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 183 - 191
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (584 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Energetic implosions, using two or three load wires to create a focused axial stagnation of dense wire cores amidst the assembled precursor plasma, are examined with respect to the trade between the implosion mass lost to precursor ablation and the mass or kinetic energy available at stagnation. The calculated kinetic energy at stagnation serves as the primary source for the output X-radiation which is estimated with a tabulated collisional radiative model. View full abstract»

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  • Characterization of a 30 kV, 75 C triggered vacuum switch

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 192 - 196
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (592 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We designed, fabricated, and tested sealed-off triggered vacuum switches (TVSs) used as an ETC-gun switch. To fabricate the sealed-off TVS, we developed fabrication processes. The TVSs were successfully tested up to 30-kV peak charging voltage, 109-kA peak current, 1.5-ms current pulse-width, and 75-coulomb integrated charge transfer. Compared to other reported similar switches, the tested switch showed high trigger reliability. This was realized by the unique fabrication process we developed. The TVS also shows high electrical characteristics in terms of operating voltage and current, charge transfer, and pulse length. Rectifying characteristics of the switch were also investigated. We found that the tested TVS had a specific area to have the diode phenomena. The area was defined by the rate of current decay and also the rate of reverse voltage rise. The defined area somewhat varies depends on circuit conditions. However, the tested TVS acted as a diode if the rate of current decay was less than 10 kV/μs, and the rate of reverse voltage rise was less than 230 A/μs. View full abstract»

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  • r-z two-dimensional numerical Simulations of a frozen inert gas plasma MHD Generator

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 197 - 204
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation with a frozen inert gas plasma (FIP), the effect of the nonuniformity of the inlet plasma in the direction perpendicular to walls on the performance and the comparison of the performance with r-θ two-dimensional (2-D) numerical simulations are examined with r-z 2-D ones. The inlet nonuniformity of an ionization degree is kept throughout the channel and even in the boundary layer the state of the FIP is realized without an ionization instability. When the inlet ionization degree near the walls is higher than that in the main flow, the enthalpy extraction ratio decreases because the strong MHD interaction near the wall leads to the development of the boundary layer. On the other hand, it increases for the inverse distribution at the channel inlet, even if the introduced total inlet ionization degree is the same. In comparison with the results obtained from the r-θ simulation, the development of the boundary layer results in the deterioration of the performance, and the optimal condition shifts to the low inlet ionization degree and the high load resistance. View full abstract»

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  • Time-dependence of ion charge State distributions of vacuum arcs: an interpretation involving atoms and charge exchange collisions

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 205 - 209
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Experimentally observed charge state distributions are known to be higher at the beginning of each arc discharge. Until know, this has been attributed to cathode surface effects in terms of changes in temperature, chemical composition, and spot mode. Here it is shown that the initial decay of charge states of cathodic arc plasmas may be at least in part due to charge exchange collisions of ions with neutrals. Neutrals gradually fill the discharge volume, and therefore, the effect of charge exchange shows delayed onset after arc initiation. Besides desorbed gases, sources of neutrals may include evaporated atoms from macroparticles and still-hot craters of previously active arc spots. More importantly, atoms are also produced by energetic condensation of the cathodic arc plasma. Self-sputtering is significant, and additionally, ions have a low sticking probability when impacting at oblique angle of incidence. Estimates show that the characteristic time for filling the discharge volume agrees well with the charge state decay time, and the likelihood of charge exchange is reasonably large to be taken into account. View full abstract»

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  • Stable and diffuse atmospheric pressure glow plasma in a multipoint-to-plane configuration in air

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 210 - 211
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a multipin-to-plate electrode configuration at negative polarity, a stable and diffuse atmospheric pressure glow discharge, controlled by fast airflow, was obtained. Electrical characteristics and still photos of the discharge were obtained. A mechanism of the discharge stabilization by fast airflow is discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Special issue on plasma-assisted combustion

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 212
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  • Celebrating the vitality of technology the Proceedings of the IEEE [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 213
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  • Explore IEL IEEE's most comprehensive resource

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 214
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  • IEEE copyright form

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 215 - 216
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c3
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Plasma Sciences focuses on plasma science and engineering, including: magnetofluid dynamics and thermionics; plasma dynamics; gaseous electronics and arc technology.

 

 

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Editor-in-Chief
Steven J. Gitomer, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist, US Civilian Research & Development Foundation
Guest Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory
1428 Miracerros Loop South
Santa Fe, NM  87505  87505  USA
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