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Computer

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 28
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Masthead

    Page(s): 2
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  • Article summaries

    Page(s): 4
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  • Letters

    Page(s): 6
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  • Building on the Past - Looking to the Future

    Page(s): 7 - 9
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  • 32 & 16 Years Ago

    Page(s): 16 - 17
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    The more we know about yesterday, the better we will be able to deal with today. Computer offers this column providing excerpts from past issues to serve as a memory jogger for older members and as a perspective creator for newer members. View full abstract»

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  • Malicious bots threaten network security

    Page(s): 18 - 20
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    Viruses, worms, Trojan horses, and network intrusions are among the threats that security administrators worry about on a regular basis. However, there is a less familiar threat that many experts say could be just as dangerous: malicious bot software. A bot is a program that operates automatically as an agent for a user or another program. Hackers forward bots to victims by a number of means, and the software automatically infects vulnerable computers. The bots then wait for commands from a hacker, who can manipulate them and the infected systems without the user's knowledge. A hacker can install bots on multiple computers to set up botnets that they can use for massive distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks that overwhelm victimized systems' defenses. Botnets can also be used for mass spam mailings, installing key-logging software that can steal victims' passwords and data, and compromising computers to prepare them for infection by future viruses. View full abstract»

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  • Squeezing supercomputers onto a chip

    Page(s): 21 - 23
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    Researchers are pursuing various ways of developing chips with supercomputer-level capabilities. For example, using designs with multiple processing cores that operate in parallel can boost performance. Thus, some of the new supercomputer-on-chips don't run as fast as Pentium processors, making them more energy efficient, but yield higher performance. Research projects are also using small chip-feature sizes, enabling them to pack processors with more transistors and circuitry and thereby boost performance. View full abstract»

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  • News Briefs

    Page(s): 24 - 26
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  • Robonaut: the 'short list' of technology hurdles

    Page(s): 28 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1792 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The International Space Station highlights NASA's reliance on extravehicular activity spacewalks to configure external equipment, connect services, and perform maintenance. Conventional EVA operations are planned for two astronauts working an eight-hour day. The recent emergence of highly dexterous space robots could help conserve EVA hours by relieving humans of many routine inspection and maintenance chores and assisting them in more complex tasks. As astronaut surrogates, the robots could take risks unacceptable to humans, respond more quickly to EVA emergencies, and work around the clock on renewable power. NASAL plans to someday deploy EVA teams-that combine the in formation-gathering and problem-solving skills of human astronauts with the survivability and-physical capabilities of diverse robot archetypes. View full abstract»

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  • Reactive animation: realistic modeling of complex dynamic systems

    Page(s): 38 - 47
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    Some complex systems are transformational, of an input-process-output type, repeatedly carrying out their prescribed work for each new set of inputs. A far more problematic class comprises large systems that are heavily controlor event-driven. Such systems (dubbed reactive because they react to various kinds of events, signals, and conditions in intricate ways) are often concurrent and distributed. Reactive animation, a patent pending technology, offers great promise as a way to enhance the visualization of system behavior, especially for reactive systems, which are a central part of most current computerized technologies. View full abstract»

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  • Embedded entertainment with smart projectors

    Page(s): 48 - 55
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    The popularity of today's flat-panel liquid-crystal and plasma TV displays shows that emerging trends favor large-screen displays. Another display type may soon conquer the entertainment market, however: video projectors have experienced an enormous metamorphosis during the past decade. These devices now offer admirable cost reductions and performance increases, and they can generate images much larger than the devices themselves. The screens on which they project their images, however, require a large area. Smart projectors, on the other hand, allow a correct projection onto many arbitrary existing surfaces, such as papered walls or curtained windows. View full abstract»

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  • Self-assembled architectures and the temporal aspects of computing

    Page(s): 56 - 64
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    Despite the convenience of clean abstractions, technological trends are blurring the lines between design layers and creating new interactions between previously unrelated architecture layers. For example, virtual machines such as VMWare and Transmeta implement the application-software-visible architecture in virtual-machine software, allowing more flexibility in the hardware/software interface beneath the VM layer. Future technologies will likely further increase the interactions between design layers. Programmable self-assembly is an emerging fabrication technology that must be considered in the higher layers of computer system design. This technology offers an opportunity to perform computation during the fabrication process itself. View full abstract»

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  • Challenges for quantum computing with solid-state devices

    Page(s): 65 - 69
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    Quantum computing has attracted considerable interest in the past decade as a possible way to deal with certain intractable problems of conventional digital computing. Quantum computers built using the versatile methods of solid-state technology are attractive because the many thousands of devices needed for such a computer could be fabricated with well-established technologies. However, the imperfections of solid-state devices constructed in laboratories and factories will limit the use of solid-state devices in quantum computing. The challenge for solid-state quantum computing is to find a. way to use devices without precise knowledge of their physical characteristics. View full abstract»

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  • Computer Society Information

    Page(s): 70
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  • India's IT services industry: a comparative analysis

    Page(s): 71 - 75
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    To remain globally competitive, multinational corporations are outsourcing their IT services and relocating their labor-intensive operations overseas to low-wage countries. In the past decade, India's IT services industry emerged as an important player in this global market. While worldwide IT services revenue increased less than 2 percent from 2000 to 2003, India's IT services industry experienced a 22 percent revenue growth - a pace comparable to the rise in Hong Kong's electronics industry during the 1970s. View full abstract»

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  • Computer Society Offers a Wide Array of Products and Services in 2005

    Page(s): 79 - 83
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  • Call and Calendar

    Page(s): 84 - 87
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  • Advertisement/Product Index

    Page(s): 99
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  • Bookshelf

    Page(s): 100
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  • Products

    Page(s): 101 - 102
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  • The engineering of supersystems

    Page(s): 103 - 105
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    An everyday mobile phone contains two to four processors executing several hundred million instructions per second (MIPS) in closely coupled or networked configurations that implement the mobile modem as software on a single digital signal processor (DSP). The base stations controlling wireless and wireline communications systems are themselves a hierarchy of closely coupled systems with multiprocessor (typically DSP) subsystems executing billions of instructions per second. A complete base station can incorporate from five to 20 subsystems and 100 separate processors. These supersystems, incorporating possibly dozens of processors in closely coupled or networked topologies, pose a design challenge at least equal to that of designing the component systems and processors. Supersystem design and verification must address hardware complexity that increases with each successive generation of a product family, as well as embedded software content that increases exponentially with time. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington