IEEE Pervasive Computing

Issue 4 • Oct.-Dec. 2004

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s): c1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (219 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Inside front cover]

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s): c2
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (1042 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • From the Editor in Chief: When Disaster Strikes

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):2 - 3
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Can pervasive computing technologies help first responders? Even modest improvements in basic capabilities such as vision, navigation, and communication have the potential to be of great help. What specific forms might such help take in the future? View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Letters

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):4 - 5
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (182 KB) | HTML iconHTML
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Thin clients get second chance in emerging markets

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):6 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    If the IT industry had an award for the most promising technology that failed to make its mark, the thin client would be a major contestant. Heralded in the 1990s as an alternative to the PC, the thin client or "network PC" promised lower maintenance cost, higher productivity, and improved security. But the market had other ideas. The thin client remained a niche market, and the PC still rules the... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mobile phones as computing devices: the viruses are coming!

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):11 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (75)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Understanding existing threats against mobile phones helps us better protect our information and prepare for future dangers. Mobile phones have evolved from their roots as analog walkie-talkies to full-scale Internet-enabled computers. Today, mobile phone handsets are arguably the dominant computer form factor consumers purchase. But having such powerful networked computers leads to a new class of... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Sensor networks for emergency response: challenges and opportunities

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):16 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (413)  |  Patents (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1480 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Sensor networks, a new class of devices has the potential to revolutionize the capture, processing, and communication of critical data for use by first responders. CodeBlue integrates sensor nodes and other wireless devices into a disaster response setting and provides facilities for ad hoc network formation, resource naming and discovery, security, and in-network aggregation of sensor-produced da... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Robot and sensor networks for first responders

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):24 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (88)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1584 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The need to collect, integrate, and communicate information effectively in emergency response scenarios exceeds the state of the art in information technology. This emergency response problem provides an interesting and important test bed for studying networks of distributed mobile robots and sensors. Here, we describe the component technologies required to deploy a networked-robot system that can... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computers in police cruisers

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):34 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1264 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    A typical police cruiser is filled with electronic devices, displays, and inputs, all competing for the officer's attention. The Project54 system integrates those devices, and its speech-based user interface lets officers operate them without taking their eyes off the road. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Keeping a beat on the heart

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (37)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1136 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    We have developed and benchmarked real-time collection methods that exploit digital, packet-switched telephony services available in metropolitan areas. The Arrhythmia monitoring system collects real-time electrocardiogram signals from a mobile or homebound patient, and combines them with GPS location data, and transmits this information to a remote station for display and monitoring. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Inferring activities from interactions with objects

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):50 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (354)  |  Patents (13)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1192 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    A key aspect of pervasive computing is using computers and sensor networks to effectively and unobtrusively infer users' behavior in their environment. This includes inferring which activity users are performing, how they're performing it, and its current stage. Recognizing and recording activities of daily living is a significant problem in elder care. A new paradigm for ADL inferencing leverages... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using interaction signatures to find and label chairs and floors

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):58 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1016 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Our research takes an action-centered approach to automatically learning and classifying functional objects. Our premise is that interpreting human motion is much easier than recognizing arbitrary objects because the human body has constraints on its motion. Moreover, humans tend to interact differently with different objects, so you should be able to identify an object by analyzing how people mov... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Toward an OSGi-based infrastructure for context-aware applications

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):66 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (125)  |  Patents (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (808 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Applications and services must adapt to changing contexts in dynamic environments. However, building context-aware applications is still complex and time-consuming due to inadequate infrastructure support. We propose a context-aware infrastructure for building and rapidly prototyping such applications in a smart-home environment. This OSGi-based infrastructure manages context-aware services reliab... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Pervasive 2004: A Viennese Treat

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):75 - 77
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (856 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    At the 2nd International Conference on Pervasive Computing, researchers and practitioners in all areas of pervasive and ubiquitous computing met in palatial surroundings to participate in workshops, technical presentations, and a doctoral colloquium. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Pervasive speech recognition

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):78 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    As mobile computing devices grow smaller and as in-car computing platforms become more common, we must augment traditional methods of human-computer interaction. Although speech interfaces have existed for years, the constrained system resources of pervasive devices, such as limited memory and processing capabilities, present new challenges. We provide an overview of embedded automatic speech reco... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • New Products

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):82 - 83
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (712 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In this issue, editors Keith Farkas and Guerney Hunt review a prototyping solution to help small business prototype new devices. They also look at a wireless iPAQ, a proposed PC for the world, technology in mobile phones, and an interactive TV. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Dynamic networking and smart sensing enable next-generation landmines

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):84 - 90
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (336 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    To address the hazards to civilians, recent landmine systems have incorporated command detonation by remote operator and self-destruct capabilities. To improve military performance and prevent civilian casualties, the US military is integrating wireless networking and autonomous sensing into next-generation landmines. These new systems increase target discernment, enhance battle-shaping capabiliti... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Annual Index

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):91 - 96
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Pervasive Computing explores the role of computing in the physical world–as characterized by visions such as the Internet of Things and Ubiquitous Computing. Designed for researchers, practitioners, and educators, this publication acts as a catalyst for realizing the ideas described by Mark Weiser in 1988.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Maria R. Ebling, Ph.D.
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center