By Topic

Engineering Management Review, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date 2004

This publication contains reprint articles for which IEEE does not hold copyright. Full text is not available on IEEE Xplore for these articles.

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 23 of 23
  • Your first year on the job: conceptualizing new directions

    Page(s): 53 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    This work proposes the search of "syzygy". This astronomic term that means an alignment of three celestial bodies. In local government, these three bodies are the community (voter), the political body (council), and the city or country organization (employees). The goal of the manager is to orchestrate these three entities so they are all moving in the same direction. To obtain a syzygy in my own communities, I implement these ten points: the change process, bringing others along with you, conceptual understanding, citizen involvement, intrajurisdictional collaborations, visioning, economic consideration, multiple municipal businesses and strategic thinking. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • How to lead a self-managing team

    Page(s): 21 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    This work discusses the teams that are basically left to run themselves can be highly efficient and productive. To be successful, though, such autonomous groups require a specific type of external leadership. To get work done, many companies organize employees into self-managing teams that are basically left to run themselves with some guidance from an external leader. In fact, comprehensive surveys report that 79% of companies in the fortune 1000 and 81% of manufacturing organizations currently deploy such "empowered", "self-directed" or "autonomous" teams. Because of their widespread use, much research has been devoted to understanding how best to set up self-managing teams to maximize their productivity and effectiveness. Interestingly, though, relatively little attention has been paid to the leaders who must oversee such working groups. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE Engineering Management Society

    Page(s): 0_2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (169 KB)  
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Understanding the role of "vision" in project success

    Page(s): 57 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    Rigorous applications of project management methodologies are responsible, though only partially, for project success. We argue, however, that a significant driver of project management success is effective and intelligent leadership communicated through an inspiring vision of what the project is meant to achieve and how it can make a significant positive impact. An information technology case study project is presented to illustrate how project vision provided and maintained commitment to a complex project that was judged successful when compared to similar projects despite the difficulties described. This success was substantially attributed to the project leadership group's use of a vision. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Knowing when to ask for help

    Page(s): 131 - 133
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (206 KB)  

    The discussion is concerned with situation when one is are really stuck. You need to figure out what kind of help you need to solve a problem, and then, most importantly, you need the humility to seek it out. Some of the important points in the discussion are: control of situation, consulting for help, listen first and to speak next, humility. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Systems engineering in an age of complexity

    Page(s): 29 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    This work considers the creation of complex engineered systems (CES) and the systems engineering approach by which they are designed. The changing nature of the challenges facing systems engineering is discussed, with particular focus on the increasing complexity of modern systems. It is argued that modern complexity poses a major challenge to our ability to achieve successful systems and that this complexity must be understood, predicted and measured if we are to engineer systems confidently. We acknowledge previous work, which concluded that in complex systems, failures ("accidents") may be inevitable and unavoidable. To further explore potential tools for increasing our confidence in complex systems, we review research in the field of complexity theory to seek potentially useful approaches and measures and find ourselves particularly interested in the potential usefulness of relationships between the magnitudes of events and their frequency of occurrence. Complexity theory is found to have characterized naturally occurring systems and to potentially be the source of profitable application to the systems engineering challenge, viz., the creation of complex engineered systems. We are left with the tentative conclusion that truly complex systems, with our present understanding of complex behavior, cannot be designed with a degree in confidence that is acceptable given our current expectations. We recommend that the discipline of systems engineering must investigate this issue as a matter of priority and urgency and seek to develop approaches to respond to the challenge. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Pragmatism, adaptation, and total quality management: philosophy and science in the service of managing continuous improvement

    Page(s): 113 - 121
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    Today's engineering managers who use total quality management (TQM) face the challenge of moving it from adoption to seamless incorporation into their organizations. Both the application and the theory of TQM can be advanced through an examination of the philosophy of pragmatism and the sciences of adaptation. Pragmatism provides a philosophy that establishes a theory for incorporating TQM into engineers' management practice; it derives its epistemology from actual experience. In essence, pragmatism suggests that practical experience, such as that gained from the continuous improvement of and experimentation with TQM, provides the basis for successful organizational performance. The sciences of adaptation identify the characteristics of organizations that promote successful adaptation. They suggest that incremental adjustments to ongoing change are keys to effective and successful growth. This paper explores both philosophy and science to identify actions and attitudes that can enable the success of TQM in an organization. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Anticipating disruptive innovation

    Page(s): 74 - 85
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    Organizations in today's hypercompetitive world face the paradoxical challenges of "dualism," that is functioning efficiently today while innovating effectively for tomorrow. Corporations, no matter how they are structured, must manage both sets of concerns simultaneously. To do this, organizations have to understand and learn to manage the dynamics of innovation that underlie both disruptive and sustaining innovations. Most analyses have been flawed by giving too little weight to the interactions between needs and technologies. Based on a dynamic model of these interactions, three distinct patterns of substitution are identified that illustrate how these two forces intersect. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Doing things collaboratively: realizing the advantage or succumbing to inertia?

    Page(s): 11 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    We explore the nature of the practice of collaboration, focusing in particular on some of the reasons why collaborative initiatives tend to challenge those involved. Two concepts are central to this exploration. The first is collaborative advantage. This captures the synergy argument: to gain real advantage from collaboration, something has to be achieved that could not have been achieved by any one of the organizations acting alone. This concept provides a useful "guiding light" for the purpose of collaboration. The second concept, collaborative inertia, captures what happens very frequently in practice: the output from a collaborative arrangement is negligible, the rate of output is extremely slow, or stories of pain and hard grind are integral to successes achieved. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Managing project quality

    Page(s): 86 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    This work discusses with the superior quality and project management that optimize the performance excellence of organizations, so every quality practitioner needs to be able to manage project quality effectively. Unfortunately, the combined leverage of quality and project management is often underutilized due to inadequate experience in both fields, time pressures or budgetary cutbacks. In the project quality initiation stage there are many activities involved, in the first stage, such as development of ethical work culture values, an agreement to make fact based decisions, adoption or development of a quality policy, determination of team operating principles and identification of assumptions and risks are considered. Then it will focus on: identification, alignment, selection, chartered commitment to the selected project. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Managing to be ethical: debunking five business ethics myths

    Page(s): 39 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    In the aftermath of recent corporate scandals, managers and researchers have turned their attention to questions of ethics management. We identify five common myths about business ethics and provide responses that are grounded in theory, research, and business examples. Although the scientific study of business ethics is relatively new, theory and research exist that can guide executives who are trying to better manage their employees' and their own ethical behavior. We recommend that ethical conduct be managed proactively via explicit ethical leadership and conscious management of the organization's ethical culture. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Presentation mastery

    Page(s): 126 - 130
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    Presentation mastery is the "next big thing" in personal and corporate communications-a concept that essentially defines what it means to be a black belt in the presentation arts, and lays out a structured, disciplined approach for ordinary people to achieve this rarified level of presentation excellence. Presentation effectiveness is one of the most overlooked aspects of professional life. Masters spend their time researching their audience or clients, learning what's important to them, and reflecting on how their message is going to make sense to the people in their audience. The problem facing most presenters who want to improve is deciding where to start and exactly what to work on. That's where Jeary's presentation mastery framework comes in handy. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • How to succeed in the hyper-human economy

    Page(s): 91 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    White-collar work is increasingly being automated, or "off-peopled," just as happened with farming and manufacturing work. To survive, workers will need to develop skills that can't be performed by machines. As information technology automates white- and blue-collar functions alike, most of the remaining jobs as we know them are being transferred into all-electronic systems. A new class of jobs has yet to be named: work involving hard automating hyper-human skills that go beyond know-how. The right strategy is as know-how gets easier and easier to store and apply through networks and automatic systems, the winning strategy is to move up from know-how work to "hyper-human" or "meta-mental" work, which consists of those functions that computers cannot easily replicate. In order to move to a hyper-human future, we need to mobilize, hyper-human skills right now: clear, sensible thinking as well as caring, responsible goal setting, planning, and determination. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Deep smarts

    Page(s): 3 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    Deep smarts are not philosophical-they are not "wisdom" in that sense-but they are as close to wisdom as business gets. Throughout your organization, there are people with deep smarts. Their judgment and knowledge-both explicit and tacit-are stored in their heads and hands. Their knowledge is essential. The organization cannot progress without it. You will be a more effective manager if you understand what deep smarts are, how they are cultivated, and how they can be transferred from one person to another. Very few organizations manage this asset well, perhaps because it's difficult to pin down and measure. Such neglect is risky. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Setting up as a consultant the devil is in the details

    Page(s): 122 - 125
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    Making a success of a consultancy means finding a niche where you can offer clients an edge over competing consultants. You cannot be all things to all people. If, for instance, you want to function as a customer's representative reviewing process designs, project economics and schedules, be sure to portray yourself as such. If you want to specialize in particular unit operations, you should emphasize that forte. Among other choices, you may intend to make your name as an expert witness, or as an economic and market analyst, an adviser on educational curricula, a counselor to government or nongovernmental organizations, or to equipment vendors or technology licensors; whatever the choice, be sure to advertise yourself specifically as such. In any case, be objective and never stretch the facts as to your capabilities. Later in this article, we give recommendations on how to market your services. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Surf's up

    Page(s): 134 - 135
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB)  

    This work describes the changing pulse of customer relationship management (CRM), which can be researched with Web resources. These Web resources offer useful tools for identifying unmet customer needs and practical tips for boosting satisfaction and loyalty levels. CRM is considered essential to Internet marketing strategy and Web design goals. Customer management zone on insightexec, customer service benchmarking association, destination CRM, Internet marketing center, and questionbuilder.com are some of the Web resources that can help companies explore present and potential customer perspectives. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE Engineering Management Review

    Page(s): 0_1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (178 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (191 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • It takes a team

    Page(s): 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (211 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Turning around runaway information technology projects

    Page(s): 97 - 112
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (15 KB)

    This publication contains reprint articles for which IEEE does not hold copyright. Full text is not available on IEEE Xplore for these articles. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Engineering Management Calendar

    Page(s): 136
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (15 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Engineering Management Review includes papers that are aimed at those engaged in managing research, development, or engineering activities.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief

Paul K. Bergey

The University of Melbourne
Department of Management & Marketing
10th Floor, 198 Berkeley Street
Victoria, 3010 Australia