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IT Professional

Issue 5 • Date Sept.-Oct. 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Masthead

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 7
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Distance learning versus being there

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 8 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Chronicle of Higher Education recently reported that "the boom in educational technology has not lived up to its promise of revolutionizing the classroom and making higher education more profitable" (Carnevale, 2004). The Chronicle later highlighted a study showing that "while the innovations have made courses more convenient, the spending [on IT in the classroom] has yet to have a large impact on learning" (Young, 2004). On the other hand, this same article states that "of the students surveyed, 76.1% said their experience using a course-management system was positive or very positive, with only 6.6% saying it was negative or very negative (17.3% were neutral on the issue)." So how effective is online versus traditional instruction? The author's personal observation is that his online students performed about as well as my traditional students on all their assignments, tests, and exercises. Different types of practice materials were available to the different classes, each appropriate to the teaching or learning situation in use. However, despite studies on instructional methods, there has never been a definitive answer to the question. View full abstract»

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  • Effective Leadership: Best from a Distance?

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 11
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  • Building minds, not widgets: technology for the business of learning

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 12 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (456 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Over the past decade, CIOs in both the corporate and academic worlds have focused on creating an IT infrastructure that supports a variety of business processes through networks, mail systems, and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. It is clear that to enhance productivity and increase market share, IT must go beyond general business support to a model that improves core product design and quality. Such a shift should occur at institutions of higher education as well. IT provides a competitive advantage only if it improves learning effectiveness while containing the labor costs of instruction. Successful CIOs in higher education are those who can transfer corporate experience to a teaching and learning culture. Key stakeholders n this case, the provost, department heads, and faculty - judge them for their direct contribution to the key university differentiator, the quality of the graduating students. This is a formidable challenge, but one that CIOs must undertake if IT is to reach its full potential in a university setting. View full abstract»

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  • A Web-enabled plagiarism detection tool

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 19 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (912 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Internet and the World Wide Web have revolutionized information sharing and searching; it is difficult to remember what academic research was like without it, or how we could possibly live without it again. It is an awesomely powerful resource, and therein lays the rub. We're talking about academic dishonesty. In particular we're talking about plagiarism, or passing off another person's work as your own. This is clearly a big problem for universities and schools, but it is not just an educational problem. The publishing industry, and periodical publications in particular, face the same issues. This paper presents several Web-based tools that can be used to detect plagiarism. View full abstract»

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  • Understanding spyware: risk and response

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 25 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Spyware - programs that monitor a computer user's activities and capture data about the user, storing the information so a third party can access it s a relatively new phenomenon. Spyware countermeasures are just now maturing beyond their initial capabilities, with many choices available to enterprises and individual users. As this field matures, threats and responses are becoming more sophisticated. One major concern has been the time lag between how quickly threats have evolved compared to how quickly counter-measures become available to deal with the threats. Spyware has evolved rapidly because of the profit motivation that spurs it forward. The good news is that countermeasures will grow dramatically in the near future, also because of a strong - and only recently recognized - profit potential. This will help the response catch up to the threat, but only if IT professionals understand how spyware works. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE 8O2.11: wireless LANs from a to n

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 32 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    From its inception in 1980, the IEEE 802 committee has led the way in developing LAN (local area network) standards. The committee's work on wireless LANs (WLANs) began in 1987 within the TEEE 802.4 working group. Developing an ISM (industrial, scientific, and medical)-based WLAN using the equivalent of a token-passing bus media access control (MAC) protocol was the committee's initial goal. After some work, the committee decided that a token-bus-controlled radio medium would cause inefficient use of the radio frequency spectrum. In 1990, the committee formed a new working group, IEEE 802.11, specifically devoted to WLANs, with a charter to develop a MAC protocol and physical-medium specification. Since then, demand for WLANs, at different frequencies and data rates, has exploded. Keeping pace with this demand, the IEEE 802.11 working group has issued an ever-expanding list of standards. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering process standards: state of the art and challenges

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 38 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the last 20 years, software engineering standards have evolved from documenting processes in the military complex to supporting the total software life cycle. Standards that define software engineering processes are still progressing in terms of the breadth and depth of their coverage and the maturity of the standards themselves. In this regard, they are moving closer to standards in older engineering professions. The shift from many major producers to just a few has changed the industry. As we've moved to a global economy, vendors have put more faith in international standards as a means of selling their products. Reducing the number of major producers has made the remaining more powerful. In this article, we examine the state of the art of software engineering process standards and discuss challenges that the profession must address. Our focus is on all existing software process standards. View full abstract»

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  • Ad/Product Index

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 46
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  • NASA's swarm missions: the challenge of building autonomous software

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 47 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (34)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) introduces its new millenium mission class. Motivated by the need to gather more data than is possible with a single spacecraft, scientists have developed a new class of missions based on the efficiency and cooperative nature of a hive culture. The missions, aptly dubbed nanoswarm is a little more than mechanized colonies cooperating in their exploration of the solar system. Each swarm mission can have hundreds or even thousands of cooperating intelligent spacecraft that work in teams. One swarm mission under concept development for 2020 to 2030 is the autonomous nano technology swarm (ANTS). For software and systems development, this is uncharted territory that calls for revolutionary techniques. View full abstract»

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  • Programming with assertions: a prospectus [software development]

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 53 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To address the quality problem for software, developers need a technology that specializes in producing robust software. One widely used process that supports the construction of quality software is testing, which executes the program with input data or test cases, and then compares the output data to expected results. However, the transfer of techniques from research to practice has been slow because many techniques do not scale to real programs. An alternative to testing that has increasing popularity and usage entails the use of assertions to monitor the data attributes of functions or classes. Assertions are formal constraints on the behavior of a software application. Assertions can help improve software quality. To use them effectively, it's important to determine when they are valid. View full abstract»

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  • Resources

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 60 - 61
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  • Toward a business process grid for utility computing

    Publication Year: 2004
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Existing grid computing technologies take advantage of underused computing capacity to solve business problems and provide IT-level infrastructure to support business applications. A business grid's ultimate goal, however, is to apply the utility model of grid computing to business applications; that is, provide support services for charging users on a pay-per-use basis, much as a utility company charges for electricity. That way, the vendor takes the responsibility for application maintenance and upgrade. Thus, a business grid provides a virtualized infrastructure to support the transparent use and sharing of business functions on demand. View full abstract»

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  • [Inside back cover]

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c3
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IT Professional is a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society for the developers and managers of enterprise information systems.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
San Murugesan
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