By Topic

IT Professional

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 2004

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (574 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (506 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Masthead

    Page(s): 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (51 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Services computing: grid applications for today

    Page(s): 5 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB)  

    The coming generation of Internet applications promises to incorporate a distinctly different view of software, one based on services. Services computing is the evolution of Internet computing toward a services-oriented architecture. By service oriented, we mean that business will purchase functionality in chunks. Rather than buying software for permanent in-house installation, companies will buy services as needed. A services model removes the burden of updates and patches from the IT department, returning such work to its rightful owners: the vensors that sell the software. To support such a scenario, an architecture must embrace a new technology suite that includes Web services and a service-oriented architecture for grid and utility computing, and autonomic computing. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • CIOs: the only competent university administrators

    Page(s): 8 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB)  

    Some interesting differences between the folks who become college and university vice presidents and the CIO equivalents who run IT infrastructures at universities. It is probably worth noting that higher-education institutions, especially public ones, have greatly different goals than private-sector organizations: Simply stated, private companies are in business to make money, and public education institutions are in business to spend it. Clearly, the skill sets required to accomplish these goals are different. Performance-based promotions are more common in industry. In successful companies, middle- and upper-level managers are mostly competent and competitive survivors who have proven themselves through quantifiable successes. This is so unlike higher education, where promotions often take place on the basis of meeting government quotas, being someone's good friend, being collegial, or just applying persistently for administrative positions somewhere, anywhere, until hired. Expecting a professor to become an effective administrator is like expecting an orange to become an apple. Higher education teaches people who become professors to be individual contributors. Graduate work and dissertations are a personal endeavor. Promotion within the ranks results exclusively from individual effort. Even teaching is an individual effort; as long as no student complains, instructors can do whatever they like in the classroom. So what exactly qualifies an ex-professor to take on personnel and budgetary responsibility in large, complex organizations? Unfortunately, the answer is nothing. In our 21st century IT-dependent world, failures in the IT department are highly visible to everyone, with very real consequences to the entire user community. It's no surprise that the only real insight of university administrators has been to hire CIOs who have real-world experience; someone has to. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Software in the new millennium: a virtual roundtable

    Page(s): 10 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB)  

    What will software look like in the future? To answer this question, we conducted a survey of our editorial and industrial advisory boards, as well as a few outsiders. We constructed a set of 13 questions that we thought reflected the original query. We then circulated these questions to our boards, with a request to respond to the questions, or be extend them with additional are questions as appropriate. The answers were far ranging and sometimes surprising. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Java's futures: challenge and opportunity

    Page(s): 19 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (488 KB)  

    Although Java's successful timing might have begun as an accident, Java has earned its market share by being adaptable enough to find its way into new areas. The question some are asking is, can it continue its success on the server side and become competitive on the client side? Ironically, Java's current critical battle is in the arena where it has been the most successful: server-side applications. Sun's Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE)-an open technology framework that integrates many components-is the primary player. J2EE, in contrast, lets designers redeploy any component to any platform with minimal, if any, changes. Yet despite its platform-independence advantage, J2EE is facing strong challenges from .NET. To retain a competitive edge, J2EE must convince managers of its reasonable total cost of ownership and ease of operation; it must also appeal to developers through its technical coolness and ease of development. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Improving Web access for visually impaired users

    Page(s): 28 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB)  

    Technology advances and the continuing convergence of computing and telecommunications have made an unprecedented amount of information available to the public. For many people with disabilities, however, accessibility issues limit the impact of such widespread availability. Of the many types of disabilities-mobility, hearing, and learning impairments, for example-vision impairments are most pervasive in the general population, especially among seniors. The world's rapidly aging population is redefining visually impaired, which refers to individuals with low vision (that is, people for whom ordinary eyeglasses, contact lenses, or intraocular lens implants don't provide clear vision), color blindness, and blindness. In 1998, the US Congress amended the Rehabilitation Act, strengthening provisions covering access to government-posted information for people with disabilities. As amended, Section 508 requires federal agencies to ensure that all assets and technologies are accessible and usable by employees and the public, regardless of physical, sensory, or cognitive disabilities. Most current assistive technologies for visually impaired users are expensive, difficult to use, and platform dependent. A new approach by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH), addresses these weaknesses by locating the assistive capability at the server, thus freeing visually impaired individuals from the software expense, technical complexity, and substantial learning curve of other assistive technologies. NLM's Senior Health Web site (http://nihseniorhealth.gov), a talking Web (a Web application that presents Web content as speech to users), demonstrates the approach's effectiveness. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Wearing two hats: analyst-managers for small software projects

    Page(s): 34 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB)  

    With the evolution of software development, companies have changed their project methodology and are asking IT employees to evolve with them. The business analyst talks to users, ironing out the details of what they wanted and balancing that wish list against what an IT system could economically or practically deliver. The business analyst also ensures that users develop business processes to support the software. The actual task of writing the software falls to a project manager and his team of software developers. Today, companies commonly ask IT managers to assume the business analyst role in addition to their duties as project manager, especially in small projects. This article discusses how IT managers can successfully navigate the thin line between business analyst and project manager. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Project estimation: a simple use-case-based model

    Page(s): 40 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB)  

    Software development estimates are inaccurate and overly optimistic estimates are major contributors to project failure, despite the fact that every completed project is a rich source of information about performance and estimation. Modern development processes promote risk management, the realization of architecture first, the decomposition of the project into iterations, and the assignment of requirements to these iterations. When a project adopts these forms of best practice, it achieves a high degree of technical control and easier management. One difficult project management task is to accurately determine the effort required to complete the project. This article discusses a use-case-based estimation model for determining project effort. This technique calls for looking at the relationship between estimated and actual data to improve future estimates. Using a simple set of metrics, it is possible to generate a credible model for project estimation. The model described here works best in an iterative development process, allowing comparisons between successive iterations. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computer Society Information

    Page(s): 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (76 KB)  
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Software quality from a behavioral perspective

    Page(s): 46 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  

    The challenge facing software quality research is to produce a metric that will guide developers in choosing techniques to achieve the desired product quality. "Quality" comprises some set of key behavioral attributes: reliability, performance, fault tolerance, safety, security, availability, testability, and maintainability. Software quality is thus a function of these combined attributes plus an error term that represents quality aspects these eight attributes can't define. This article discusses how to quantify these behavioral attributes by working around relative values and formulating schemes from an attribute's key indicators. Thus, one can still assign numerical values to various attributes and then normalize them. By having such a system during requirements elicitation, developers can immediately begin to determine what techniques, methodologies, tools, processes, and costs they will need to produce a system with that quality level. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Defining business requirements quickly and accurately

    Page(s): 51 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1432 KB)  

    A critical task in an enterprise IT architecture project is to identify and understand key business requirements to ensure that the planned IT systems will fully support and evolve with the business. This article illustrates a more effective approach: leveraging the combined power of value chain, which captures the static business view, and use cases, which animate the business model. In this way, enterprise architects can rapidly define the business's main elements and understand how key systems interact to support business activities. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Resources

    Page(s): 58 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)  
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • CE2IT: continuous ethics enhancement for IT professionals

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)  

    As IT moves into more mission-critical processes, the possibility for ethical dilemmas with far-reaching consequences increases. This article presents "Continuous Ethics Enhancement for IT Professionals" (CE2IT), a personal framework that responds to an IT professional's need for guidance in ethical decision-making. It is designed to "see to it" that IT professionals integrate ethics into their personal and professional lives. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IT Professional is a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society for the developers and managers of enterprise information systems.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
San Murugesan
BRITE Professional Services