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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug. 2004

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Education publication information

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c2
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  • DSP for practicing engineers: a case study in Internet course delivery

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 301 - 310
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (336 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the explosion of the Internet and the desire of many institutions to disseminate courses across the world, many students look to online education with promise. However, institutions planning to provide distance learning opportunities may wish to have a model to analyze before venturing forth. There are many factors that ultimately influence the methods of delivery, content, length, and technical support for an online course. This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of an online course titled DSP for Practicing Engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, and analyzes feedback from students who have taken the course and the staff who administered it. Different aspects of course development are discussed at length, including curriculum and media type. View full abstract»

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  • An integrated laboratory for processor organization, compiler design, and computer networking

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 311 - 320
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (600 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An integrated laboratory dealing with processor organization, compiler design, and computer networking has been developed. The goals of the laboratory are to make it possible for each student to work with modern and attractive materials and to learn about the interfaces between system modules, to provide students with opportunities to collaborate in the construction of a large system, and to give students a sense of accomplishment. The goals have been met based on the responses of students who have used it, verifying its effectiveness. This paper describes the design and development of the baseline components to be integrated, the laboratory organization and schedule, and the results and evaluation of the laboratory. View full abstract»

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  • A Java/Matlab-based environment for remote control system laboratories: illustrated with an inverted pendulum

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 321 - 329
    Cited by:  Papers (54)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (672 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, a novel environment is described that provides 24-h-a-day access to a Web-based lab for the remote control of different didactic setups. The control of an inverted pendulum is used to demonstrate the use of such an environment. The main attributes of this Web-based lab are: 1) the on-line interactivity with the didactic setup, 2) the possibility of defining different experiments by using parameter files, and 3) the open architecture of the environment which allows easy development of new experiments with other didactic setups. The structure of this Web-based lab not only provides students with quantitative information feedback but also allows visual supervision. Now, a remote-controlled camera plays an important role within a remote experimentation environment with mobile parts. Students can handle the camera on-line, just as they can control the didactic setup over the Internet. View full abstract»

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  • The average capacitor current method for delay calculation in MOS circuits

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 330 - 339
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The transient response of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) gates is a topic covered in most textbooks on digital integrated circuits and very-large-scale-integration (VLSI) design. One method often used to calculate first-order estimates of gate delays is the average capacitor current method. Using this method, the delay is calculated assuming that the capacitor current is constant and equal to the average of the capacitor current values at the limits of the time interval of interest. In this paper, this method is discussed and compared with other methods of delay calculation using integration and curve-fitting techniques familiar to electrical and computer engineering students. Since the computation of the capacitor current is relatively complicated because it requires the calculation of the MOS transistor currents, for propagation delay calculation there is no benefit in calculating the capacitor current twice. A single current calculation, corresponding to the familiar midpoint integration method, is sufficient to get the same or better accuracy as that of the average capacitor current method. The two-point Gauss quadrature formula is shown to provide excellent results with two capacitor current evaluations. View full abstract»

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  • A laboratory testbed for embedded computer control

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 340 - 347
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of modern embedded computers in control and other applications in the past few years. While courses offered in the electrical and computer engineering disciplines cover such topics as microprocessors, digital and analog hardware, control theory, and programming languages, there exist few courses that focus on integrating these subjects for designing embedded systems. On the other hand, there is a growing need in industry for engineers who can perform software design and system integration for various applications in embedded control. Toward filling this gap, this paper describes a laboratory testbed developed for a new course on Embedded Computer Control offered at the University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. An outline of the course structure, laboratory setup, and the design aspects for implementing a modern embedded control application are presented. The embedded controller performs command, control, and user interface tasks required to operate a low-cost prototype of a thermal system. Furthermore, its network connectivity allows users to tune system parameters, start and stop running the system, and observe the status of the plant via the Internet. View full abstract»

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  • Mechatronic experiments course design: a myoelectric controlled partial-hand prosthesis project

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 348 - 355
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    This paper describes a proposed laboratory project involving the design of a myoelectric-controlled partial-hand prosthesis to reinforce mechatronic education. The proposal focuses mainly on extract electromyogram (EMG) signals generated during contraction of the biceps. The EMG signals are first amplified and filtered by a laboratory-designed electronic circuit and then reprocessed using a microcontroller to drive the servomotor so that the designed prosthesis can be properly controlled. The project introduces students to component-level and system-level design and exposes them to the integration of a microcontroller, electronic circuits, sensors, and prosthesis mechanisms. Moreover, since the project results in a working prosthesis, student enthusiasm for mechatronic education increases, and they see its relevance to the field in applied engineering. Implementation of the laboratory project within the curriculum has been demonstrated to be highly motivational and educational and has even helped to attract more students to study mechatronic applications. View full abstract»

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  • Interprofessional projects in advanced automotive power systems: an integrated education and research multidisciplinary approach

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 356 - 360
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Increasing use of electrical power to drive automobile subsystems, which historically have been driven by a combination of mechanical and hydraulic power transfer systems, is seen as a dominant trend in advanced automotive power systems. This trend manifests itself through the more-electric-cars (MEC) concept, which requires highly reliable, fault-tolerant, and cost-effective electrical systems. This paper introduces the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Interprofessional Projects (IPRO) Program and a series of multidisciplinary student team projects focused on applications of electrical systems in advanced automobiles. IIT's interprofessional course engages multidisciplinary teams of students in semester-long projects. It delivers a team-oriented project-based requirement within the undergraduate curriculum. Among its many benefits, the interprofessional course offers the opportunity to integrate the education and research environment of the university and, in this case, introduces students to the role of electrical systems in emerging automotive platforms that offer numerous research and technology application opportunities for electrical engineers. View full abstract»

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  • Using transport equations in the teaching of electromagnetics

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 361 - 364
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (87 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The use of transport equations in the study of electromagnetics is explored. The proper form of the continuity equation for a moving, deforming region of space is given, and large-scale forms of Maxwell's equations are investigated. Useful large-scale forms may be obtained by integrating the point forms and applying various transport theorems. View full abstract»

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  • Experimental investigation into operation under single-phasing condition of a three-phase induction motor connected across a zigzag transformer

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 365 - 368
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A negative-sequence current produced during the single-phasing condition of a three-phase induction motor does not allow the motor to start and creates excessive heating while running. To eliminate the negative-sequence current, and thus to operate the motor satisfactorily under a single-phasing condition, the student is to connect a zigzag winding transformer with its star point connected to a system neutral across the motor. This experiment provides a thorough understanding of the sequence network connections under the single-phasing condition of a three-phase induction motor. View full abstract»

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  • Fire-fighting mobile robotics and interdisciplinary design-comparative perspectives

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 369 - 376
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The objective of this paper is to illustrate the benefits of an autonomous fire-fighting robot design competition as an effective tool for undergraduate education. It presents experiences at the United States Air Force Academy, USAF Academy, CO; Pennsylvania State University-Abington; and Trinity College, Hartford, CT, together with the results of the contest surveys conducted in collaboration with The Technion*Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa. The primary goal of the design project is to create an autonomous mobile robot that navigates through a maze searching for a fire (simulated by a burning candle), detects the candle's flame, extinguishes the flame, and returns to a designated starting location in the maze. The fire-fighting design contest promotes interdisciplinary design and teamwork. To accomplish the stated goal, students must integrate knowledge gained from such classes as engineering design, circuits, controls, signals and systems, computer programming, mathematics, and engineering mechanics. Within the three institutions, the contest has been successfully utilized as a foundation for a wide range of educational goals. These activities include freshman design, robotics courses, K-12 outreach, senior design projects, and undergraduate research. View full abstract»

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  • Solving optimal control problems with state constraints using nonlinear programming and simulation tools

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 377 - 384
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper illustrates how nonlinear programming and simulation tools, which are available in packages such as MATLAB and SIMULINK, can easily be used to solve optimal control problems with state- and/or input-dependent inequality constraints. The method presented is illustrated with a model of a single-link manipulator. The method is suitable to be taught to advanced undergraduate and Master's level students in control engineering. View full abstract»

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  • Simulation of dynamic systems with output saturation

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 385 - 388
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper concerns the design of simulation schemes for dynamic systems with output saturation. The use of saturation blocks commonly available in simulation programs leads to incorrect results if the saturation is simply inserted at the output of a dynamic system model. The underlying problem is discussed on the basis of a simplified theoretical example, and a solution based on a state-space model of the system is proposed. Experimental results involving a dc motor with shaft speed saturation are presented to illustrate the inadequacy of the simple saturation model and to validate the proposed simulation scheme. View full abstract»

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  • Educational graphical interfaces to learn about radiation and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 389 - 396
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (760 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an educational software tool based on three graphical Matlab interfaces. It allows the visualization of electromagnetic propagation phenomena and analysis of experiments at the undergraduate level. In each interface, mouse-driven menus allow the student to define the parameters associated with a study and to run real-time simulations on the computer. Experimental data can be integrated into the interface and compared with the modeling results. Examples are presented to illustrate the functionality of these interfaces. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching asynchronous design in digital integrated circuits

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 397 - 404
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To introduce the basis of asynchronous digital circuit design in an electrical engineering curriculum, Null Convention Logic is presented as an innovative asynchronous paradigm. The design flow from concept to circuit implementation is discussed. First, two completeness criteria are required for speed independency: symbolic completeness of expression and completeness of input. Second, threshold gates with hysteresis are primary components, which are used to build logic gates, full adder, and registers. As an example, a 4 × 4 multiplier is constructed based on these threshold gates. Finally, an example of very-high-speed integration circuit hardware description language (VHDL) simulation is given to help students practice and understand the asynchronous design methodology. View full abstract»

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  • A method for plotting the complementary root locus using the root-locus (positive gain) rules

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 405 - 409
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The root-locus method is a well-known and commonly used tool in control system analysis and design. It is an important topic in introductory undergraduate engineering control disciplines. Although complementary root locus (plant with negative gain) is not as common as root locus (plant with positive gain) and in many introductory textbooks for control systems is not presented, it has been shown a valuable tool in control system design. This paper shows that complementary root locus can be plotted using only the well-known construction rules to plot root locus. It can offer for the students a better comprehension on this subject. These results present a procedure to avoid problems that appear in root-locus plots for plants with the same number of poles and zeros. View full abstract»

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  • In search of a perfect power engineering program

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 410 - 414
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB)  

    Following a prolonged decline in enrollment and interest in power engineering, educators have formulated a variety of responses they believe will stem the tide of woes that seem to have besieged the profession. The range of creative solutions proposed in many programs are centered around what a power engineering curriculum should contain, how course materials should be delivered, and how to market (or promote) the program. This paper takes a critical look at a number of studies on curriculum development and learning in higher education. It examines the role that should be given to students' conception about learning, instructors' experience and teaching philosophies, and the impact of curriculum organization on students' performance in the design and implementation of educational innovations. The best aspects of the new innovations in a power engineering curriculum are then combined with other components that are deemed necessary to come up with what a model power engineering program should look like. View full abstract»

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  • Automated PSpice simulation as an effective design tool in teaching power electronics

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 415 - 421
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, PSpice is used to deepen the student understanding of power electronics and to serve as a design tool for power converter circuits. A library that includes automated versions of dc/dc converters and rectifiers is built in PSpice using ideal switches. The automated version permits students to design converter circuits that meet a set of design criteria. The performance of various designs are tested by plotting the current and voltage waveforms using the graphics postprocessor Probe. The library was introduced to students in a power electronics course, and they have been asked to augment its contents through mini-design projects. The response was positive, which will encourage the extension of the approach to other subjects. View full abstract»

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  • Special issue on mobile technology for education

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 422
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Join IEEE

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 423
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Quality without compromise [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 424
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (319 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Education information for authors

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Blank page [back cover]

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University