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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 7 • Date July 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Inside front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • FSM-based incremental conformance testing methods

    Page(s): 425 - 436
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (736 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The development of appropriate test cases is an important issue for conformance testing of protocol implementations and other reactive software systems. A number of methods are known for the development of a test suite based on a specification given in the form of a finite state machine. In practice, the system requirements evolve throughout the lifetime of the system and the specifications are modified incrementally. We adapt four well-known test derivation methods, namely, the HIS, W, Wp, and UIOv methods, for generating tests that would test only the modified parts of an evolving specification. Some application examples and experimental results are provided. These results show significant gains when using incremental testing in comparison with complete testing, especially when the modified part represents less than 20 percent of the whole specification. View full abstract»

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  • Tool support for verifying UML activity diagrams

    Page(s): 437 - 447
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (760 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe a tool that supports verification of workflow models specified in UML activity diagrams. The tool translates an activity diagram into an input format for a model checker according to a mathematical semantics. With the model checker, arbitrary propositional requirements can be checked against the input model. If a requirement fails to hold, an error trace is returned by the model checker, which our tool presents by highlighting a corresponding path in the activity diagram. We summarize our formal semantics, discuss the techniques used to reduce an infinite state space to a finite one, and motivate the need for strong fairness constraints to obtain realistic results. We define requirement-preserving rules for state space reduction. Finally, we illustrate the whole approach with a few example verifications. View full abstract»

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  • Shortening matching time in OPS5 production systems

    Page(s): 448 - 457
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1032 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A rule-based system must satisfy stringent timing constraints when applied to a real-time environment. As the scale of rule-based expert systems increases, the efficiency of systems becomes a pressing concern. The most critical performance factor in the implementation of a production system is the condition-testing algorithm. We propose a new method based on the widely used RETE match algorithm. We show an approach designed to reduce the response time of rule-based expert systems by reducing the matching time. There are two steps in the method we propose: The first makes an index structure of the tokens to reduce the α-node-level join candidates. The second chooses the highest time tag for certain β-nodes to reduce the amount of combinatorial match that is problematical in a real-time production system application. For this purpose, a simple compiler is implemented in C and the response time of test programs is measured. View full abstract»

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  • Abstract communication model for distributed systems

    Page(s): 458 - 472
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (752 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In some distributed and mobile communication models, a message disappears in one place and miraculously appears in another. In reality, of course, there are no miracles. A message goes from one network to another; it can be lost or corrupted in the process. Here, we present a realistic but high-level communication model where abstract communicators represent various nets and subnets. The model was originally developed in the process of specifying a particular network architecture, namely, the Universal Plug and Play architecture. But, it is general. Our contention is that every message-based distributed system, properly abstracted, gives rise to a specialization of our abstract communication model. The purpose of the abstract communication model is not to design a new kind of network; rather, it is to discover the common part of all message-based communication networks. The generality of the model has been confirmed by its successful reuse for very different distributed architectures. The model is based on distributed abstract state machines. It is implemented in the specification language AsmL and is used for testing distributed systems. View full abstract»

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  • TURTLE: a real-time UML profile supported by a formal validation toolkit

    Page(s): 473 - 487
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1608 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a UML 1.5 profile named TURTLE (Timed UML and RT-LOTOS Environment) endowed with a formal semantics given in terms of RT-LOTOS. TURTLE relies on UML's extensibility mechanisms to enhance class and activity diagrams. Class diagrams are extended with specialized classes named Tclasses, which communicate and synchronize through gates. Also, associations between Tclasses are attributed by a composition operator (Parallel, Synchro, Invocation, Sequence, or Preemption) which provides them with a formal semantics. TURTLE extends UML activity diagrams with synchronization actions and temporal operators (deterministic delay, nondeterministic delay, time-limited offer, and time-capture). The real-time dimension of TURTLE has been further improved by the addition of two composition operators, periodic and suspend, as well as suspendable delay, latency, and time-limited offer operators at the activity diagram level. Core characteristics of TURLE are supported by TTool - the TURTLE toolkit - which includes a diagram editor, a RT-LOTOS code generator and a result analyzer. The toolkit reuses RTL, a RT-LOTOS validation tool offering debug-oriented simulation and exhaustive analysis. TTool hides RT-LOTOS to the end-user and allows him/her to directly check TURTLE modeling against logical errors and timing inconsistencies. Besides the foundations of the TURTLE profile, this paper also discusses its application in the context of space-based embedded software. View full abstract»

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  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): 488
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  • TSE Information for authors

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org