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Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Member Digital Library [advertisement]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1225
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  • Proceedings of the IEEE publication information

    Page(s): 1226
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  • Scanning the issue

    Page(s): 1227 - 1228
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  • Holographic Data Storage Systems

    Page(s): 1229 - 1230
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  • Holographic data storage systems

    Page(s): 1231 - 1280
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6848 KB)  

    In this paper, we discuss fundamental issues underlying holographic data storage: grating formation, recording and readout of thick and thin holograms, multiplexing techniques, signal-to-noise ratio considerations, and readout techniques suitable for conventional, phase conjugate, and associative search data retrieval. Next, we consider holographic materials characteristics for digital data storage, followed by a discussion on photorefractive media, fixing techniques, and noise in photovoltaic and other media with a local response. Subsequently, we discuss photopolymer materials, followed by a discussion on system tradeoffs and a section on signal processing and en/decoding techniques, succeeded by a discussion on electronic implementations for control, signal encoding, and recovery. We proceed further by presenting significant demonstrations of digital holographic systems. We close by discussing the outlook for future holographic data storage systems and potential applications for which holographic data storage systems would be particularly suited. View full abstract»

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  • Formal verification of timed systems: a survey and perspective

    Page(s): 1283 - 1305
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (616 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An overview of the current state of the art of formal verification of real-time systems is presented. We discuss commonly accepted models, specification languages, verification frameworks, state-space representation schemes, state-space construction procedures, reduction techniques, pioneering tools, and finally some new related issues. We also make a few comments according to our experience with verification tool design and implementation. View full abstract»

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  • Specification and analysis of power-managed systems

    Page(s): 1308 - 1346
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    Dynamic power management encompasses several techniques for reducing energy dissipation in electronic systems by selective slowdown or shutdown of components. We present a theoretical framework for explaining and classifying different approaches to power management. Within this framework, we model power-manageable components, workloads, and controllers as discrete-event systems (DESs). The structure of these DESs is specified in terms of physical states (representing operation modes) and events (triggering state transitions), while system behavior is specified in terms of next-event and next-state functions. In particular, nondeterministic next-event and next-state functions are modeled by conditional probability distributions, according to generalized semi-Markov processes (GSMPs). The modeling framework provides a general denotational model for system specification and a rigorous execution semantics that enables event-driven simulation. We introduce a modeling framework, built on top of MathWork's Simulink, supporting the specification and execution of our model. In particular, we present templates for the Simulink simulator to execute GSMP models, and we describe how to use such templates for specifying, analyzing, and optimizing dynamic power-managed systems. Finally, we demonstrate the expressive power and versatility of the proposed approach by using the modeling framework and the simulator for the analysis of representative real-life case studies, including the Intel Xscale processor architecture, a multitasking real-time system, and a sensor network. View full abstract»

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  • Electrical engineering hall of fame - George Westinghouse

    Page(s): 1347 - 1349
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    In 1911, the well-known inventor-entrepreneur George Westinghouse became the third recipient of the Edison Medal awarded by the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE). He was honored for his important contributions to the "development of the alternating current system for light and power." A prolific inventor, he received approximately 400 patents during his career of almost 50 years and founded several companies, including the electrical manufacturing company which still bears his name. View full abstract»

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  • Future Special Issues/Special Sections of the IEEE Proceedings

    Page(s): 1350 - 1351
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  • Quality without compromise [advertisement]

    Page(s): 1352
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  • Celebrating the vitality of technology the Proceedings of the IEEE [advertisement]

    Page(s): c3
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  • Proceedings of the IEEE check out our September issue

    Page(s): c4
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H. Joel Trussell
North Carolina State University