IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 2 • April-June 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Alex Roland with Philip Shiman, Strategic Computing: DARPA and the Quest for Machine Intelligence [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):91 - 93
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  • Karl E. Ganzhorn, The IBM Laboratories Boeblingen Foundation and Build-Up: A Personal Review [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):90 - 91
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  • People, languages, and computers: a short memoir

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):62 - 83
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    A memoir spanning school and career, colleagues and friends, and a variety of intellectual passions tells of a life well lived. The author's story touches on all these aspects, but its central focus is his research and work in Ottawa and at the University of Alberta. View full abstract»

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  • Raul Rojas, Encyclopedia of Computers and Computer History [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s): 90
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  • Recollections of the Philco Transac S-2000

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):34 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    In 1954, engineers at Philco Corporation invented the surface barrier transistor, the first transistor suitable for use in high-speed computers. Philco set up a computer activity - eventually a computer division - and in 1957 introduced the Philco Transac S-2000, the first large-scale, transistorized scientific computer system offered as a product by a computer manufacturer. In the spring of 1958,... View full abstract»

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  • Think piece - Jumping contexts of space and time

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):96 - 95
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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  • Five 1951 BBC broadcasts on automatic calculating machines

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):3 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    In May and June 1951, five leading figures of British computing - Douglas Hartree, Max Newman, Alan Turing, Frederic ("Freddie") Williams, and Maurice Wilkes - spoke about their work on BBC radio. We examine surviving texts of their broadcasts, and the speakers' principal points are summarized through quotations and commentary. The broadcasts are placed in the context of contemporary developments ... View full abstract»

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  • Computer sciences at Prudue University-1962 to 2000

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):48 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
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    Purdue University established the first academic department of computer sciences in 1962. The events leading to its establishment are chronicled and its first 35 years of development presented. Nationally, computer science departments experienced a steady increase in size and activities, which were reflected in Purdue's experience. The two periods of crises in the department's history were trigger... View full abstract»

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  • Events and sightings

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):84 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Scientists of the late 18th century did not have an obvious way to test a machine to see if it was actually mimicking human thought. In some ways, the Chess-Playing Turk was accepted as a thinking machine because it acted like a machine. The division of labor was the first step in designing a machine to do a complex task. The machine designer would have to analyze the task, identify individual act... View full abstract»

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  • Datamation's glory days

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):16 - 21
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    The author's tenure as an editorial advisor to Datamation magazine from 1965 to 1971 paralleled an era of computer technology journalism that chronicled and set the tone for the industry's emergence as a dominant force in business and society. Some of the flavor of this period is captured in this account of the author's interaction with legendary editor Bob Forest. View full abstract»

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  • Sydis and the voice/data terminal craze of 1984

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):22 - 33
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    In 1984, computing firms saw integrated voice/data terminals (IVDTs) as the solution to the proliferation of new forms of executive communication. The Sydis VoiceStation was hailed as the best of this new class of office machine but, like all IVDTs, it failed. Sydis succumbed to "integration stress," one danger of product development driven by the urge to integrate traditionally discrete functions... View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s): 01
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  • IEEE Annals of the History of Computing - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):0_2 - 1
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  • From the Editor's desk

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s): 2
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  • Biographies: Robert W Floyd, in Memoriam

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):75 - 83
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Anecdotes

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s):86 - 89
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  • IEEE Annals of the History of Computing - Editorial Board

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s): 97
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  • Join the IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 2004, Page(s): 98
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing serves as a record of vital contributions which recount, preserve, and analyze the history of computing and the impact of computing on society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Nathan Ensmenger
Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing
nensmeng@indiana.edu