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Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1  Part 3 • Date Feb. 2004

 This issue contains several parts.Go to:  Part 1  | Part 2 

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science publication information

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c2
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  • Method of matched asymptotic expansions versus intuitive approaches: calculation of arc cathode spots

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 249 - 255
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A model of steady-state solitary spots with a step-function dependence of the density of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode surface on the surface temperature is suggested. While being simple and clear cut, this model, nevertheless, reflects essential features of the physics involved. It is found that a solution obtained by means of the method of matched asymptotic expansions is close to exact numerical results, in contrast to a solution obtained with the use of Steenbeck's principle of minimum power. View full abstract»

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  • High-current-density electron emission from lead zirconium titanate ferroelectric disc under application of short-duration high-voltage pulses

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 256 - 261
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    High-current-density pulsed-electron emission is observed from a poled lead zirconium titanate (PZT, Zr/Ti:53/47) ferroelectric ceramic disc on application of short-duration (∼6 ns) negative high-voltage (∼4 kV) pulses. Electron-emission pulses with a peak current density ∼400--450 A/cm2 and a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) duration of ∼200--250 ns were recorded in the presence of a dc extraction field. These are comparable to the various earlier results obtained using excitation pulses of duration comparable to the polarization switching time (≥100 ns). Self-emission of electrons with a current density of ∼20--30 A/cm2 was also observed. The experimental observations indicate occurrence of partial polarization reversal in the ferroelectric sample followed by plasma formation on the surface. View full abstract»

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  • Operational characteristics of a periodic plasma torch

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 262 - 268
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Development of a plasma torch, which is intended as an ignition aide within a supersonic combustor, is studied. The high-voltage discharge and plasma plume generated by the torch module are described in a quiescent environment and in a supersonic crossflow. Voltage-current characteristics of the discharge and optical images of the plasma plume are used to characterize the operation of the torch module. The principal advantages of this torch module are its compact design, durability, and operational flexibility. The torch module can be operated in periodic or pulsed modes, depending on the power supply used. In the periodic mode presented in this paper, the capacitors are charged at the line frequency of 60 Hz resulting in a cyclical discharge at a frequency of 120 Hz. In this mode, peak and average powers reaching 8 and 2.8 kW, respectively, are demonstrated. The energy can be as high as 46 J per cycle, which is mainly limited by the power handling capability of the power supply. The penetration height and the volume of torch plume into a Mach 2.5 supersonic flow, typical for a supersonic combustor startup condition (vis-a-vis the crossflow velocity), are investigated. In addition, ignition of ethylene fuel in a Mach 2 supersonic flow with a total temperature of 590 K and pressure of 5.4 atm is demonstrated. View full abstract»

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  • Physical characteristics of plasma antennas

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 269 - 281
    Cited by:  Papers (59)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (616 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This experimental and theoretical study examines the excitation of a plasma antenna using an argon surface wave discharge operating at 500 MHz with RF power levels up to 120 W and gas pressures between 0.03 and 0.5 mb. The results show that the length of the plasma column increases as the square root of the applied power and that the plasma density decreases linearly from the wave launcher to the end of the plasma column. These results are consistent with a simple global model of the antenna. Since noise is critical to communication systems, the noise generated by the plasma was measured from 10 to 250 MHz. Between 50 and 250 MHz the excess noise temperature was found to be 17.2±1.0 dB above 290 K. This corresponds to an ohmic thermal noise source at 1.4±0.3 eV, compared with an electron temperature of 1.65 eV predicted by the global model. Estimates of the electrical conductivity of the plasma column based on measured electron number densities lead to an antenna efficiency of about 65% at a transmission frequency of 100 MHz and an increase in total antenna noise of 1 dB due to the plasma. Theoretical modeling and experimental observations of the radiation pattern of the antenna show that the linear variation of conductivity and finite resistance of the column lead to a reduction in the depth of the s in the radiation pattern and a consequent increase in the width of the main lobe. View full abstract»

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  • Miniaturized magnetic nitrogen DC microplasmas

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 282 - 287
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper explores the use of miniaturized magnets to enhance the parameters of dc microplasmas. The microplasmas are powered by thin coaxial electrodes and are enhanced by a coaxial magnetron configuration machined from niobium composite magnets. At operating pressures of 1-4 torr, a glow region that is confined to the volume directly over the cathode, forms a traditional magnetron-type annular ring. Three coaxial magnets, ranging in total size from 3.2 to 7.2 mm in outside diameter generate measured magnetic fields up to 3030 G. The magnetic field structure is profiled with a small Hall probe and is modeled by finite-element analysis. The plasma currents for various applied voltages are measured, and the plasma breakdown/termination voltages are determined. In nitrogen ambients at 1.2 torr and 370-V bias, the current changes from 9.3 mA in the absence of a magnetic field to 17.6 mA with the addition of the largest magnet. The sheath region decreases with the addition of the magnetic structures, illustrating an effect on the Debye length and, therefore, the local plasma density. The dimensions of the sheath are found to vary radially within the annular microplasma. The smallest sheath corresponds to the region of highest magnetic field over the south pole for the largest magnetic configuration. This effect is used to generate a microplasma in SF6 on a silicon wafer producing a localized etch. The etch rate in the region of the brightest glow is three times greater than the weakest etch rate, allowing spatially localized etch selectivity without masking. View full abstract»

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  • A new RMSP reset pulse for improved reset discharge controllability in AC PDP

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 288 - 295
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We are proposing a new ramp-biased multiple short pulse (RMSP) for AC plasma-display panels, which is composed of multiple short pulses with fast ramp bias up to 5 V/μs. Through adjustment of the period and duty ratio of RMSP and using the tail effect, we have succeeded in controlling the final wall voltage level by ±10 V from the level of (peak RMSP voltage)-(discharge breakdown voltage). We applied RMSP to the reset period and achieved stable discharge, higher address margin, and lower background luminance as well as shorter reset time. When compared with the conventional ramp reset method, the new reset method using RMSP could improve the darkroom contrast ratio by 52% and shorten the reset time by 215 μs for each subfield. View full abstract»

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  • Theory of dynamic behavior in atmospheric pressure arc plasma devices. I. Theory and system behavior

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 296 - 307
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fluctuations in atmospheric pressure arc plasma devices play important role in plasma processing applications. A full knowledge and control over such fluctuations can effectively lengthen lifetime and drastically improve performance and reliability. Dynamical analyses of associated experimental fluctuating signals established existence of chaotic dynamics in such devices. However, the origin of such fluctuations remained unexplained so far and no theoretical investigation is carried out to explore underlying physics behind such phenomena. This work addresses development of a general theory for such fluctuations in atmospheric pressure arc plasma devices in terms of various nondimensional parameters using basic governing equations and presents the result of application of the theory to various important experiments reported in literature. Various aspects of dynamic behavior have been investigated through the study of coefficients appearing in the nonlinear amplitude equation. It has been shown that the theory supports arc current and gas flow rate as the major externally available controlling parameters in agreement with experiment. Theory exhibits period doubling route to chaos under variation of control parameter as observed experimentally. System includes catastrophic behavior for some operating range. The whole work is divided into two parts. This paper presents part I: development of theory for such fluctuations using basic equations of the dynamics and study of system behavior. View full abstract»

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  • Theory of dynamic behavior in atmospheric pressure arc plasma devices: part-II: validation of theory with experimental data

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 308 - 315
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The results of an application of the developed nonlinear theory for atmospheric pressure arc plasma instability to various experiments are presented in this paper. Most of the important experiments on atmospheric pressure arc plasma instability reported in literature are addressed. In all cases, a good match has been observed between experiment and theory. General nature of the theory to explain observed instability features is brought out in this paper. View full abstract»

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  • Ion-matrix sheaths inside cylindrical bores with small radii and longitudinal grooves

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 316 - 319
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, ion-matrix sheaths inside infinitely long cylindrical bores with longitudinal grooves are studied analytically to optimize ion implantation, concerning a broad range of industrial products. The radius of the cylindrical target is assumed to be less than the sheath length to simulate realistic targets, such as barrels and muzzles. The potential profiles inside and outside the grooves are derived and the ion velocity components inside the grooves are estimated. Finally, suggestions for improving the implantation uniformity on the surfaces of such targets are stated. View full abstract»

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  • Special issue on images in plasma science

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 320
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  • Special issue on plasma-assisted combustion

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 321
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    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 322
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  • IEEE copyright form

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 323 - 324
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c3
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Plasma Sciences focuses on plasma science and engineering, including: magnetofluid dynamics and thermionics; plasma dynamics; gaseous electronics and arc technology.

 

 

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Editor-in-Chief
Steven J. Gitomer, Ph.D.
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Guest Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory
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