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Computing & Control Engineering Journal

Issue 6 • Date Nov. 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • The EC DRIVE programme-halfway through

    Page(s): 247 - 253
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (853 KB)  

    Road traffic accidents in Europe result in well over 50000 deaths each year. Many European states are experiencing acute road traffic congestion in and around their major urban centres, estimated to be costing over Pounds 50 billion each year. At the same time, there is increasing public sensitivity to the environmental costs of movement by road. Increasing prosperity and the steady removal of tariff and non-tariff barriers are stimulating the demand for transport of all kinds, leading to a deepening crisis of mobility by road. It is within this context that the DRIVE programme is endeavouring to bring about a co-ordinated approach to the development and application of road transport informatics (RTI), namely information technology and telecommunications applied to road transport.<> View full abstract»

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  • Distributed image processing for the quality control of industrial fabrics

    Page(s): 241 - 246
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (428 KB)  

    Describes a transputer-based image processing system developed at Sheffield University which can be used for real-time measurement of industrial fabrics. The vision system allows unblurred images of a fabric to be captured and analysed while the fabric is being produced. The problem of using the measurements thus gained in a suitably designed feedback system to give computer control of the weaving process is discussed View full abstract»

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  • Neural systems engineering: towards a unified design discipline?

    Page(s): 259 - 265
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB)  

    The burgeoning interest in `neural networks' (or `parallel distributed processing' or `connectionism') is now an established fact. Whether this will grow into a new engineering discipline or not is still an open question. This article discusses the beginnings of a unified approach aimed at enabling engineers to design and build significant neural systems in an effort to improve the competence of computing systems in general View full abstract»

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  • The status of UK manufacturing

    Page(s): 279 - 287
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (932 KB)  

    The world climate for business-especially in electronics, automotive products and machinery-has never been better. Growth in the major economies, excepting the USA and the UK, is expected to be robust, averaging some 3%. Behind this general growth trend there are even better prospects for the manufacturing sector-in 1989 world trade volume increased overall by 8% and this year it is forecast to rise by some 6%. Looking even deeper into one of the `locomotive' sectors of world business-electronics and computers-this sector looks set to grow at around 7-10%, admittedly slower than over the last 20 years where growth averaged 15% annually, but still a very healthy growth rate. Are we, as a major manufacturing nation, in a position to exploit this business growth? Has our manufacturing base become too small and too narrow and do we have enough multinational companies in the key business sectors to gain increased market share? This article discusses the status of the UK economy and in particular that of the manufacturing sector, and attempts to put some international perspective on this status. It also discusses briefly how the development of computer technology may affect working practices in the next few years and thus help the nation become more competitive View full abstract»

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  • Finite state machines for real-time software engineering

    Page(s): 275 - 278
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (452 KB)  

    Finite state machines have a fundamental importance for real-time software development. A comparison of the Mealy and Moore models for finite state machines indicates certain advantages of the Moore model over the almost industry-standard Mealy model. A refinement of the Moore model is proposed that distinguishes between continuous activities taken while the system is in a specific state, and those required at the transitions into and out of the state. Methods for using FSMs in the design model of a real-time system are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Electronics Now! [Industry-school links]

    Page(s): 256 - 257
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)  

    Describes British Telecom's commitment to the development of a quality partnership with education. Their practical support for DTI's Electronics Now! scheme, with the more recent Wealth from Science enterprise, are only two of many facets of that commitment. Links with education, both nationally and locally, must be part of an ongoing policy. To achieve anything significant in this area requires a continuous effort View full abstract»

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  • Parallelisation methodology for a turbine-blade design program

    Page(s): 266 - 272
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB)  

    A design/production procedure for impeller turbochargers is used to demonstrate the benefits of parallel computing. The procedure is based on sequential fluid dynamics evaluation code. Parallel programs run many times faster than the sequential versions, and future engineering workstations based on multiprocessors will speed up the design/prototype cycle. A hybrid parallelisation technique is developed, including data partitioning and functional decomposition. The target parallel architecture is based on the distributed memory model. Transputers are powerful devices for parallel systems. The FAST9 multitransputer card was used for parallel Fortran implementation of the sequential 3D Navier-Stokes equations solver. A speed-up of five to six times on eight transputers was achieved (using fixed problem data size) View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Published from 2003-2007, Computing and Control Engineering was concerned with computing, communications, control and instrumentation.

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