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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 6 • Date Jun 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Test selection based on finite state models

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 591 - 603
    Cited by:  Papers (103)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1260 KB)  

    A method for the selection of appropriate test case, an important issue for conformance testing of protocol implementations as well as software engineering, is presented. Called the partial W-method, it is shown to have general applicability, full fault-detection power, and yields shorter test suites than the W-method. Various other issues that have an impact on the selection of a suitable test suite including the consideration of interaction parameters, various test architectures for protocol testing and the fact that many specifications do not satisfy the assumptions made by most test selection methods (such as complete definition, a correctly implemented reset function, a limited number of states in the implementation, and determinism), are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Testability of software components

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 553 - 564
    Cited by:  Papers (58)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (992 KB)  

    The concept of domain testability of software is defined by applying the concepts of observability and controllability to software. It is shown that a domain-testable program does not exhibit any input-output inconsistencies and supports small test sets in which test outputs are easily understood. Metrics that can be used to assess the level of effort required in order to modify a program so that it is domain-testable are discussed. Assessing testability from program specifications and an experiment which shows that it takes less time to build and test a program developed from a domain-testable specification than a similar program developed from a nondomain-testable specification are also discussed View full abstract»

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  • Using flat concurrent Prolog in system modeling

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 493 - 512
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1784 KB)  

    The flat concurrent Prolog (FCP) language, which enables the implementation of synchronization through data flow, communication through shared variables, parallelism through the reduction of the AND components in the clause's body, and indeterminacy through guarded commands, is discussed. It is shown that FCP, used in conjunction with Petri net methods, forms a powerful tool in the modeling of parallel systems that involve concurrency. The simulation of systems represented by various types of Petri nets is achieved using the reduction process of FCP. AND parallelism supports free competition among conflicting enabled transitions. A structural analysis of systems is provided using the metaprogramming technique View full abstract»

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  • A packaging system for heterogeneous execution environments

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 626 - 635
    Cited by:  Papers (20)  |  Patents (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (860 KB)  

    A packaging system that allows diverse software components to be easily interconnected within heterogeneous programming environments is described. Interface software and stubs are generated for programmers automatically once the programmers express their application's geometry in a few simple rules and module interconnection language attributes. By generating custom interface code for each application, based on analysis and extraction of interfacing requirements, the system is able to produce executables whose run-time performance is comparable to manually integrated applications. The system is implemented within the Unix environment View full abstract»

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  • Analysis and refinement of software test data adequacy properties

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 565 - 581
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1772 KB)  

    Test data adequacy criteria are standards that can be applied to decide if enough testing has been performed. Previous research in software testing has suggested 11 fundamental properties which reasonable criteria should satisfy if the criteria make use of the structure of the program being tested. It is shown that there are several dependencies among the 11 properties making them questionable as a set of fundamental properties, and that the statements of the properties can be generalized so that they can be appropriately analyzed with respect to criteria that do not necessarily make use of the program's structure. An analysis that shows the relationships among the properties with respect to different classes of criteria which utilize the program structure and the specification in different ways is discussed. It is shown how the properties differ under the two models in order to maintain consistency that the dependencies are largely a result of five very weak existential properties, and that by modifying three of the properties, these weaknesses can be eliminated. The result is a reduced set of seven properties, each of which is strong from a mathematical perspective View full abstract»

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  • An executable language for modeling simple behavior

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 527 - 543
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1624 KB)  

    SXL, a modeling language that describes system behavior rather that software structure, is discussed. Using a conventional state-transition framework, model behavior is determined by rules that define pre- and postconditions for each transition. Behavior is also specified by constraints (logical invariants) that are automatically enforced during the execution of the model. Rules and constraints are expressed solely in terms of entity-relationship structure and declarative logic; the language lacks machine-oriented data or control structures, and has no facilities for specifying or implementing software. Application of SXL is demonstrated by its translation of a simple behavioral description (a scenario from an actual requirements document) into an executable model. Comparisons are made to software- and specification-oriented methods to illustrate the tradeoffs resulting from SXL's restriction to simple behavioral modeling. A brief account is given of one software development group's experience with SXL View full abstract»

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  • Information resources management in heterogeneous, distributed environments: A metadatabase approach

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 604 - 625
    Cited by:  Papers (19)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2096 KB)  

    The core structure of a metadatabase system for information integration in heterogeneous and distributed environments, the global information resources dictionary (GIRD) model for unified metadata representation and management (both data and knowledge), is discussed. Overviews of metadatabase systems and the two-stage entity relationship (TSER) representation method are presented. To illustrate some major properties of the metadatabase model, and to show how the GIRD elements fit together to deliver these properties, manufacturing information management examples are given. The GIRD and the information resources dictionary system (IRDS) standard are compared View full abstract»

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  • Specification of fault-tolerant system issues by predicate/transition nets and regular expressions-approach and case study

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 513 - 526
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1388 KB)  

    A method to systematically integrate fault tolerance properties into the design of complex software systems is presented. The method exploits a formal specification of the system in which the amount of necessary redundancy can be determined. The system description is based on a combination of a predicate/transition net with regular expressions. The net model provides a formal overview of the system behavior in general, supporting the correct understanding of potential concurrency in the system processes. Regular expressions are used to model the sequential behavior of single-system components in detail. Both model layers provide well-defined levels of error detection; the regular expressions enable the system designer to also determine and introduce redundancy to achieve error correction. The techniques used to describe and analyze system behavior are explained using a case study that contains a stepwise-refined specification and analysis of a multistory shelving system model that has been implemented using the method presented. It is shown that the method applies to any software system which is to be protected against the considered errors View full abstract»

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  • A contingency approach to estimating record selectivities

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 544 - 552
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (768 KB)  

    An approach to estimating record selectivity rooted in the theory of fitting a hierarchy of models in discrete data analysis is presented. In contrast to parametric methods, this approach does not presuppose a distribution pattern to which the actual data conform; it searches for one that fits the actual data. This approach makes use of parsimonious models wherever appropriate in order to minimize the storage requirement without sacrificing accuracy. Two-dimensional cases are used as examples to illustrate the proposed method. It is demonstrated that the technique of identifying a good-fitting and parsimonious model can drastically reduce storage space and that the implementation of this technique requires little extra processing effort. The case of perfect or near-perfect association and the idea of keeping information about salient cells of a table are discussed. A strategy to reduce storage requirement in cases in which a good-fitting and parsimonious model is not available is proposed. Hierarchical models for three-dimensional cases are presented, along with a description of the W.E. Deming and F.F. Stephan (1940) iterative proportional fitting algorithm which fits hierarchical models of any dimensions View full abstract»

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  • On Weyuker's axioms for software complexity measures

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 636 - 638
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB)  

    Properties for software complexity measures are discussed. It is shown that a collection of nine properties suggested by E.J. Weyuker is inadequate for determining the quality of a software complexity measure. (see ibid., vol.14, p.1357-65, 1988). A complexity measure which satisfies all nine of the properties, but which has absolutely no practical utility in measuring the complexity of a program is presented. It is concluded that satisfying all of the nine properties is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for a good complexity measure View full abstract»

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  • Why is software late? An empirical study of reasons for delay in software development

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 582 - 590
    Cited by:  Papers (40)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (784 KB)  

    A study of the reasons for delay in software development is described. The aim of the study was to gain an insight into the reasons for differences between plans and reality in development activities in order to be able to take actions for improvement. A classification was used to determine the reasons. 160 activities, comprising over 15000 hours of work, have been analyzed. The results and interpretations of the results are presented. Insight into the predominant reasons for delay enabled actions for improvements to be taken in the department concerned. Because the distribution of reasons for delay varied widely from one department to another, it is recommended that every department should gain an insight into its reasons for delay in order to be able to take adequate actions for improvement View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org