By Topic

Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 2004

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Proceedings of the IEEE celebrating 92 years of in-depth coverage on emerging technologies

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (125 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 193
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (52 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Proceedings of the IEEE Society Information

    Page(s): 194
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (37 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special Issue on Gigabit Wireless

    Page(s): 195 - 197
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (59 KB)  
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An overview of MIMO communications - a key to gigabit wireless

    Page(s): 198 - 218
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (880 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    High data rate wireless communications, nearing 1 Gb/s transmission rates, is of interest in emerging wireless local area networks and home audio/visual networks. Designing very high speed wireless links that offer good quality-of-service and range capability in non-line-of-sight (NLOS) environments constitutes a significant research and engineering challenge. Ignoring fading in NLOS environments, we can, in principle, meet the 1 Gb/s data rate requirement with a single-transmit single-receive antenna wireless system if the product of bandwidth (measured in hertz) and spectral efficiency (measured in bits per second per hertz) is equal to 109. A variety of cost, technology and regulatory constraints make such a brute force solution unattractive, if not impossible. The use of multiple antennas at transmitter and receiver, popularly known as multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) wireless, is an emerging cost-effective technology that offers substantial leverages in making 1 Gb/s wireless links a reality. The paper provides an overview of MIMO wireless technology covering channel models, performance limits, coding, and transceiver design. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Great expectations: the value of spatial diversity in wireless networks

    Page(s): 219 - 270
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1208 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The effect of spatial diversity on the throughput and reliability of wireless networks is examined. Spatial diversity is realized through multiple independently fading transmit/receive antenna paths in single-user communication and through independently fading links in multiuser communication. Adopting spatial diversity as a central theme, we start by studying its information-theoretic foundations, then we illustrate its benefits across the physical (signal transmission/coding and receiver signal processing) and networking (resource allocation, routing, and applications) layers. Throughout the paper, we discuss engineering intuition and tradeoffs, emphasizing the strong interactions between the various network functionalities. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Broadband MIMO-OFDM wireless communications

    Page(s): 271 - 294
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1189 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) is a popular method for high data rate wireless transmission. OFDM may be combined with antenna arrays at the transmitter and receiver to increase the diversity gain and/or to enhance the system capacity on time-varying and frequency-selective channels, resulting in a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) configuration. The paper explores various physical layer research challenges in MIMO-OFDM system design, including physical channel measurements and modeling, analog beam forming techniques using adaptive antenna arrays, space-time techniques for MIMO-OFDM, error control coding techniques, OFDM preamble and packet design, and signal processing algorithms used to perform time and frequency synchronization, channel estimation, and channel tracking in MIMO-OFDM systems. Finally, the paper considers a software radio implementation of MIMO-OFDM. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ultrawideband radio design: the promise of high-speed, short-range wireless connectivity

    Page(s): 295 - 311
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1768 KB)  

    The paper provides a tutorial overview of ultrawideband (UWB) radio technology for high-speed wireless connectivity. Subsequent to establishing a historical and technological context, it describes the new impetus for UWB systems development and standardization resulting from the FCC's recent decision to permit unlicensed operation in the 3.1-10.6 GHz band subject to modified Part 15 rules and indicates the potential new applications that may result. Thereafter, the paper provides a system architect's perspectives on the various issues and challenges involved in the design of link layer subsystems. Specifically, we outline current developments in UWB system design concepts that are oriented to high-speed applications and describe some of the design tradeoffs involved. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-speed satellite mobile communications: technologies and challenges

    Page(s): 312 - 339
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Central features of future 4G mobile communication systems are high-speed data transmission (up to 1 Gb/s) and interactive multimedia services. For effective delivery of these services, the network must satisfy some stringent QoS metrics, defined typically in terms of maximum delay and/or minimum throughput. Mobile satellite systems will be fully integrated with the terrestrial cellular systems to provide ubiquitous global coverage to diverse users. The challenges for future broadband satellite systems, therefore, lie in the proper deployment of state-of-the-art satellite technologies to ensure seamless integration of the satellite networks into the cellular systems and its QoS frameworks, while achieving, as far as possible, efficient use of satellite link resources. The paper presents an overview of future high-speed satellite mobile communication systems, the technologies deployed or planned for deployment, and the challenges. Focusing in particular on nonlinear downlink channel behavior, shadowing and multipath fading, various physical channel models for characterizing the mobile satellite systems are presented. The most prominent technologies used in the physical layer, such as coding and modulation schemes, multiple-access techniques, diversity combining, etc., are then discussed in the context of satellite systems. High-speed and QoS-specific technologies, such as onboard processing and switching, mobility and resource management, IP routing and cross-layer designs, employed in the satellite systems are also discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Enabling gigabit network access to end users

    Page(s): 340 - 353
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To achieve innovative network architectures capable of delivering high-speed data transfers to end users, considerable efforts have been invested in minimizing or eliminating the bottlenecks that exist in high-speed network environments. These bottlenecks exist primarily at two levels, namely, network data transmission to the end system and data delivery within the end system to the user. For wired networks, improvements in fiber optic technologies have shifted the bottleneck from the underlying physical network to the end system. However, wireless networks still face obstacles at both levels to achieving high, end-to-end performance data delivery, particularly at gigabit per second rates. We first present current wireless communication technologies aimed at delivering gigabit per second transmission rates to end systems. We then investigate the bottleneck at the end system by exploring experimentally the performance benefits of a network interface architecture designed to enable high-performance, low-latency applications using minimal host resources. We compare the performance of our network interface architecture with the traditional one, using commodity PCs connected by gigabit per second local area networks running protocols such as TCP/IP and UDP/IP. We argue that such a network interface architecture can eliminate the bottlenecks prevalent in current end systems and, consequently, enables users to reap the full benefits of the high-speed networks available today. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Device technologies for RF front-end circuits in next-generation wireless communications

    Page(s): 354 - 375
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Next-generation high data rate wireless communication systems offer completely new ways to access information and services. To provide higher data speed and data bandwidth, RF transceivers in next-generation communications are expected to offer higher RF performance in both transmitting and receiving circuitry to meet quality of service. The semiconductor device technologies chosen will depend greatly on the tradeoffs between manufacturing cost and circuit performance requirements, as well as on variations in system architecture. It is hard to find a single semiconductor device technology that offers a total solution to RF transceiver building blocks in terms of system-on-chip integration. The choices of device technologies for each constituent component are important and complicated issues. We review the general performance requirement of key components for RF transceivers for next-generation wireless communications. State-of-the-art high-speed transistor technologies are presented to assess the capabilities and limitations of each technology in the arena of high data rate wireless communications. The pros and cons of each technology are presented and the feasible semiconductor device technologies for next-generation RF transceivers can be chosen upon the discretion of system integrators. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Gigabit wireless: system-on-a-package technology

    Page(s): 376 - 387
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1280 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The system-on-a-package (SOP) concept is considered as the solution of future communication modules, where more functionality, better performance, low cost, and more integrity is needed. We demonstrate how SOP technology can address the integration platform for future communication systems, especially gigabit wireless communications. After the introduction of the SOP concept, we introduce the critical design building blocks which are required in a viable SOP technology: integrated passives, embedded RF functions, including high-performance filters and baluns, and integrated antenna technologies. Second, we review how the three-dimensional deployment of core elements, such as baluns, lumped inductors, capacitors, and resistors, as well as IF or low-pass filters, enables RF-SOP module development. We demonstrate how advanced radio architectures, including direct conversion, antenna diversity, and collaborative signal processing, are enabled using the SOP technology format. Various ceramic and organic material based multilayer packaging technologies have been used for building such integrated modules as well as circuit blocks. The critical issues and challenges for developing advanced communication platforms using the SOP approach are discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Barking up the wrong (electric motor) tree

    Page(s): 388 - 392
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Even the best electrical engineers can make a mistake, and some of our Victorian forefathers wasted much time and energy in pursuing lines of research that ultimately came to a dead end. It was like that with some of the early attempts to make an electric motor based on magnetic machines rather than "electromagnetic" machines. The origin of the electric motor is usually traced back to the discovery by Oersted of the deflection of a compass by an electric current. Following that, Faraday produced continuous motion by electromagnetism in 1821. Probably Faraday never dreamed of producing power by electrical means, but other 19th-century researchers were trying to develop "electromagnetic engines" as a source of useful power. The American Joseph Henry (1797-1878) appreciated that electromagnetism might provide mechanical power. The article looks at Henry's engine and other early electric motor designs. In a commercial sense, all these machines were failures. Machine theory tells us that magnetic machines get better as they get smaller, while electromagnetic machines get better as they get larger. The future of electric power lay with electromagnetic machines. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Future Special Issues/Special Sections of the IEEE Proceedings

    Page(s): 393 - 394
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (26 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Proceedings of the IEEE Information for authors

    Page(s): 395 - 396
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (30 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Member Digital Library [advertisement]

    Page(s): c3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Proceedings of the IEEE check out our March issue

    Page(s): c4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (139 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
H. Joel Trussell
North Carolina State University