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Power Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 97
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c1 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Power Engineering Society publication information

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editorial Special Section on Power Engineering Education

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 4
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  • The state of electric power engineering education

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 5 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
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    This paper provides a summary of the state of electric power engineering education through descriptions of professional society activities, Internet resources, and results of a worldwide survey conducted in March 2003. View full abstract»

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  • Introducing electric power into a multidisciplinary curriculum for network industries

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 9 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A qualitatively different graduate level curriculum for teaching electric power systems is needed. The motivation for such a new curriculum is outlined, and a specific program, now being implemented at Carnegie Mellon University, is described. The new curriculum: 1) provides students with a multidisciplinary introduction to the changing problems of the industry; 2) stresses the need for teaching systematic approaches to formulating power system problems; and 3) integrates teaching of the fundamentals for power systems with the fundamentals for other network industries. The program, referred to as the MS in Electric Power Systems (MSEPS) Program, is being developed as a special power-focused track within Carnegie Mellon's existing multidisciplinary Information Networking Institute (INI). View full abstract»

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  • What future distribution engineers need to learn

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 17 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (27)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (83 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It is getting increasingly clear that electric distribution systems are undergoing rapid changes due to deregulation, the penetration of distributed generation and power electronics technologies, and the adoption of efficient computation, communications, and control mechanisms. The primary goal of this paper is to recommend the development of a new two-course sequence to reflect the radical changes occurring or expected to happen in the future. View full abstract»

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  • An innovative industry-university partnership to enhance university training and industry recruiting in power engineering

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 24 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many universities have in the late 1990s reduced the number of courses in power engineering, preferring to devote their resources to other areas such as information technologies. This comes at a time when it is predicted that a significant number of engineers will be retiring in the next decade, in some utilities, more than a third. A leading utility in generation, transmission, and distribution, has therefore taken the initiative, with the help of six local universities and the support of local industry, to create and finance an Institute of Electrical Power Engineering to train and recruit students, and allow universities to offer comprehensive programs in this discipline. Innovative aspects include the development of a specialized program of courses and laboratories common to participating universities, the active involvement of industry in program development, and instruction and the introduction of incentives such as scholarships, industrial projects, and internships. View full abstract»

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  • Learning to learn-concepts in a first power engineering course

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 31 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Three well-known and widely accepted concepts in educational psychology are revisited. These are "inventory of learning styles," "taxonomy of educational objectives," and "metacognition." Relationships among these concepts are highlighted. Often, a student can develop his (or her) own learning style by the process of metacognition. Ideas are borrowed from these concepts for use in a first-level power systems course. It is beyond a doubt that both cognitive and metacognitive skills are necessary for students to succeed in any course. While a semester-long power systems course leaves little time for critical thinking and passive reflection for students, certain activities may very well serve for some of these learning processes. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching utility applications of power electronics in a first course on power systems

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 40 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Power electronics applications in utility systems are growing very rapidly and promise to change the landscape of future power systems in terms of generation, operation, and control. This paper attempts to justify the importance of introducing undergraduates to these applications in the first course in power systems, so they become familiar with current and future practices and technologies. It presents a roadmap of doing so, taking a top-down approach where first various utility applications of power electronics are briefly described along with the role of power electronics as an interface, and then the power electronics systems are discussed in appropriate detail to fulfill these roles. View full abstract»

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  • An educational simulation tool for power system control and stability

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 48 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (34)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a Simulink-based educational tool developed for the purpose of illustrating power system control and stability notions as well as introducing students to realistic, though tractable in size, design problems. Relevant courses are taught to last-year undergraduate as well as graduate students at the University of Lie`ge, Belgium, and the National Technical University of Athens, Greece. After a brief description of the corresponding curricula, the paper describes the simulation tool and gives examples of problems and assignments given to the students. View full abstract»

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  • ObjectStab-an educational tool for power system stability studies

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 56 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (30)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Traditionally, the simulation of transient and voltage stability in power systems has been constrained to domain-specific tools such as Simpow, PSS/E, ETMSP, and EuroStag. While being efficient and thereby able to simulate large systems, their component models are often encapsulated and difficult or impossible to examine and modify. Also, these simulators often require substantial training and are therefore not ideal for normal classroom use. For academic and educational use, it is more important that the component modeling be transparent and flexible, and that students quickly get started with their simulations. This paper describes a freely available power system library called ObjectStab intended for power system stability simulations written in Modelica, a general-purpose object-oriented modeling language. All component models are transparent and can easily be modified or extended. Power system topology and parameter data are entered in one-line diagram form using a graphical editor. The component library has been validated using comparative simulations with EuroStag. View full abstract»

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  • The role of digital modeling and simulation in power engineering education

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 64 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper resulted from the research aimed at introducing modeling and simulation as a major methodological approach for enhancing power engineering education. The reasons for such an approach are explained first. Different options and uses of the modeling and simulation tools are discussed next. Several implementations of the teaching examples are outlined. The paper ends with the conclusions reached based on the study. View full abstract»

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  • An online portal for collaborative learning and teaching for power engineering education

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 73 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB)  

    This paper describes a web-based portal of peer-ranked sites on power engineering for educational purposes. It is a free and open resource consortium for faculty and students in power engineering. As the Internet is developing into a main educational tool, this multimedia-based application offers the educator and the student access to numerous power engineering resources. While it is possible to obtain information using one of the many popular Internet search engines, the results may not be relevant to the desired search topic. The portal described in this paper has individual hyperlinks to various web sites on power engineering that have previously been reviewed and ranked by both established faculty and students according to the versatility of each site. Peer-ranking influences the users' choice for extracting relevant information. Qualitative and quantitative statistical indexes are utilized to rank the web sites. Educators may use the resources available on the portal for educational purposes in a classroom setting. An analysis of the effectiveness of this portal on power engineering education is also offered in the paper. View full abstract»

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  • Novel technique to improve power engineering education through computer-assisted interactive learning

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 81 - 87
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a novel interactive teaching method utilizing computers to improve engineering education. The course material is divided into units covering major topics. First, the hardware related to the topic is presented using PowerPoint slides and industry-furnished videos. This is followed by a presentation of the theory. Then the students, who use computers, jointly derive the equations and their practical applications. In a computer-equipped classroom, the instructor outlines each step of the analysis, and then the students proceed to develop the equation(s) using their computers. After a few minutes, the instructor confirms the equation and the students make corrections. The knowledge expected from the students is summarized at the end of each unit in the form of questions. Instead of a final exam, each student has to pass a test at the end of each unit. The unit exam has a calculation and an essay part. The teaching effectiveness is assessed with questions that the students answer before and after the completion of the unit of study. The method has been partially tested with promising results. View full abstract»

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  • Integrated software platform to teach different electricity spot market architectures

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 88 - 95
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Electricity spot market architectures have rapidly evolved; their understanding, behavior, and redesign can be guided with the help of integrated simulation platforms. This paper presents a software platform for the integrated short-term simulation of different energy spot market architectures. The simulator considers three different architectures: i) decentralized spot markets (the separated market and system operator approach), ii) centralized spot markets (whose basis is a unit commitment model for competition in the generation side), and iii) hybrid spot market architectures (that operate under a single operator and avoid unit-commitment complexities including demand response and bilateral contracts). The software platform integrates tools for data management and display as well as available solvers for mathematical programming problems. The platform is intended and has successfully been used to teach electricity market courses at undergraduate and graduate levels at Morelia Institute of Technology in Mexico, and also in several special diploma programs on electricity markets to more than a hundred engineers from the national energy control center and the energy regulatory commission in Mexico as well as five different system/market operators of the central American countries. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching power engineering basics using advanced web technologies and problem-based learning environment

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 96 - 103
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (456 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the experience of teaching power systems basics to undergraduate engineering students using a pedagogical approach that is based upon computer-mediated and problem-based learning in an integrated way. In this approach, an interactive learning environment based on web technologies replaces the traditional lectures. The pedagogical project behind this approach is focused on the problem-based learning paradigm, where the students are instigated to construct the knowledge required to solve the problem (constructivist learning). The paper addresses the technological aspects, such as how to create simulators using Java applets and animation, as well as the pedagogical aspects, such as student performance and knowledge acquisition. The experience of using this approach at the State University of Campinas, Brazil, during the years 2001/2002 is described in detail. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach are also addressed and finally the students point of view are presented based on surveys. View full abstract»

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  • A virtual environment for protective relaying evaluation and testing

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 104 - 111
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (496 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Protective relaying is a fundamental discipline of power system engineering. At Georgia Tech, we offer three courses that cover protective relaying: an undergraduate course that devotes one-third of the semester on relaying, a graduate course entitled "Power System Protection," and a three-and-a-half-day short course for practicing engineers. To maximize student understanding and training on the concepts, theory, and technology associated with protective relaying, we have developed a number of educational tools, all wrapped in a virtual environment. The virtual environment includes a) a power system simulator, b) a simulator of instrumentation for protective relaying with visualization and animation modules, c) specific protective relay models with visualization and animation modules, and d) interfaces to hardware so that testing of actual relaying equipment can be performed. We refer to this set of software as the "virtual power system." The virtual power system permits the in-depth coverage of the protective relaying concepts in minimum time and maximizes student understanding. The tool is not used in a passive way. Indeed, the students actively participate with well-designed projects such as a) design and implementation of multifunctional relays, b) relay testing for specific disturbances, etc. The paper describes the virtual power system organization and "engines," such as solver, visualization, and animation of protective relays, etc. It also discusses the utilization of this tool in the courses via specific application examples and student assignments. View full abstract»

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  • Unified power engineering laboratory for electromechanical energy conversion, power electronics, and power systems

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 112 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1160 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces a unified power engineering laboratory capable of various experiments for power systems, power electronics, and electromechanical energy conversion. It presents a flexible hardware setup, data acquisition (DAQ), and virtual instrumentation (VI). Some features of virtual instrumentation are shown with real-time phasor diagrams, sequence component analysis, and spectral analysis of AC data. We describe the general design of a single laboratory setup, which can be used for power electronics and electromechanical energy conversion experiments independently. We also present an example of power system operations, which can be implemented by the interconnection of several laboratory stations. View full abstract»

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  • A reconfigurable FACTS system for university laboratories

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 120 - 128
    Cited by:  Papers (58)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To fully understand the dynamic performance of the multiple flexible ac transmission systems (FACTS) devices, a hardware setup is needed to complement software simulation for university research laboratories. This paper presents the schematic and basic controls of a reconfigurable FACTS system that can be used to realize the major voltage-sourced-converter FACTS topologies: the StatCom, the static synchronous series compensator (SSSC), and the unified power-flow controller (UPFC). Furthermore, the state models and control algorithms for the FACTS devices are proposed. The digital signal processor (DSP)-based control system enables new control methods to be rapidly implemented. The comparison of the experimental and simulation results is also provided to verify the proposed controls. The paper culminates in a list of suggested experiments appropriate for an elective/graduate course in electric power systems. View full abstract»

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  • A pedagogically effective structured introduction to electrical energy systems with coupled laboratory experiences

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 129 - 138
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (400 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Electrical energy conversion systems and power supply systems form an integral component of electrical and electronic systems used in residential, commercial, aerospace, transportation, and manufacturing applications. Practicing electrical engineers are often called to solve electrical energy and power-related problems. Therefore, an effective course that provides graduating electrical engineers with an energy-oriented perspective is highly desirable in today's workplace. This paper documents a course that provides students with problem solving experience in electrical systems and electronic circuits. The paper presents the pedagogical premise, course objectives, and details of lesson and lab activities, student projects, and experiences. View full abstract»

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  • Embedding remote experimentation in power engineering education

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 139 - 143
    Cited by:  Papers (27)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (488 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Engineering education by its nature is a costly program in university environments. Perhaps the most costly component is the laboratory facility, usually consisting of specialized equipment. Effective instruction of some topics in power engineering education requires experience with actual equipment, rather than small-scale replicas or simulation. In this paper, a new laboratory approach is described, as implemented in a virtual, Internet-based, experimentation platform. This virtual laboratory (VLab) utilizes real equipment distributed among multiple universities from which remotely located students can perform experiments. The software solution is a multiuser, client-server architecture developed in the LabVIEW environment. Implementation details including video, chat, archiving, and the hardware and software platforms are presented in the paper. An example presented herein is the study of current and voltage waveforms while controlling relays and low-voltage contactors. The applications have been tested with student teams enrolled in the electrical engineering department of Politehnica University of Bucharest and the power engineering program at Arizona State University. View full abstract»

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  • Power system stabilizers as undergraduate control design projects

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 144 - 151
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The use of power system stabilizers (PSS) to damp power system swing mode oscillations is of practical importance. The design of PSS is taught in graduate level courses on power system dynamics and control, and has been the topic of numerous M.S. and Ph.D. theses. This paper discusses the experience in assigning PSS projects in an undergraduate control design course to provide students with a challenging design problem using three different techniques and to expose them to power system engineering. The details of the PSS design projects using root-locus, frequency-domain, and state-space methods are provided. View full abstract»

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  • Power engineering design projects: capstone team projects versus topical design courses

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 152 - 156
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (68 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Over the years, Michigan Tech has had two different philosophies for teaching design in the power area. Initially, we integrated design into topical courses, teaching the material the students would need to complete the design. Presently, our students complete year-long, industry-sponsored projects. We will give details on the implementation of the two approaches and compare and contrast the outcomes. Both techniques for teaching design have their advantages and disadvantages. View full abstract»

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  • Robust sparse network equivalent for large systems: part I-methodology

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 157 - 163
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper deals with the calculation of a sparse network equivalent (SNE) for the analysis of electromagnetic transients in large systems. The main feature of the new approach is the enforcement of sparsity, stability, passivity, and accuracy at specific frequencies of the equivalent. The procedure is based on time-domain fitting with quadratic programming to enforce the constraints. The SNE can be interfaced with transient calculation programs directly in time domain. Results are presented in the companion paper. View full abstract»

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  • Short-term hourly load forecasting using abductive networks

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 164 - 173
    Cited by:  Papers (29)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (488 KB)  

    Short-term load modeling and forecasting are essential for operating power utilities profitably and securely. Modern machine learning approaches, such as neural networks, have been used for this purpose. This paper proposes using the alternative technique of abductive networks, which offers the advantages of simplified and more automated model synthesis and analytical input-output models that automatically select influential inputs, provide better insight and explanations, and allow comparison with statistical and empirical models. Using hourly temperature and load data for five years, 24 dedicated models for forecasting next-day hourly loads have been developed. Evaluated on data for the sixth year, the models give an overall mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) of 2.67%. Next-hour models utilizing available load data up to the forecasting hour give a MAPE of 1.14%, outperforming neural network models for the same utility data. Two methods of accounting for the load growth trend achieve comparable performance. Effects of varying model complexity are investigated and proposals made for further improving forecasting performance. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Covers the requirements, planning, analysis, reliability, operation, and economics of electric generating, transmission, and distribution systems for general industrial, commercial, public, and domestic consumption.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Antonio J. Conejo
The Ohio State University