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Microwave Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • RF CMOS come of age

    Page(s): 47 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1260 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Radio-frequency integrated circuits (RFICs) in complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS) are developing a strong presence in the commercial world. They are dominant for applications such as wireless LAN and Bluetooth and are making inroads into areas such as global system for mobile communications (GSM) cellular transceivers and global positioning system (GPS) receivers. This article offers a brief retrospective on how RF circuits and systems in CMOS have evolved to their current state of the art, followed by perspective of what the future might hold for RF systems on a chip (SOC) in CMOS. It seems appropriate today, roughly ten years after the first publications reporting RF circuits in CMOS, to document the key developments and first reports of the circuit techniques and architectural innovations that are now in widespread use for the development of a new generation of RFICs. View full abstract»

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  • SAW-based radio sensor systems for short-range applications

    Page(s): 68 - 76
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1748 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless autonomous surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors offer high flexibility for modern sensor systems. Because no battery or wiring is required for power-supply and communication tasks, they can be advantageously employed for nearly all kinds of short-range identification and measurement applications, where the use of conventional sensors, e.g., on moving or rotating parts or in industrial process chambers. Here, the basics of SAW-based radio sensor systems are reviewed and different examples out of a manifold of possible applications are given. Wireless SAW identification and sensor systems operate stable and maintenance free over many years even in harsh industrial environments. With a fast readout of only a few microseconds, a readout-distance of up to several meters, and a high sensor stability, even at temperatures above 200 °C, these highly flexible SAW-based radio systems are ideally suited for a multitude of measurement tasks in industrial, automotive, transportation, and domestic applications. View full abstract»

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  • A review of thin-film resonator technology

    Page(s): 61 - 67
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (807 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Thin-film resonator technology has been under development for over 40 years as a means to reach higher frequencies than obtainable with conventional quartz-crystal technology. Using advances in microelectronic processing, thin films of piezoelectric materials are used to fabricate resonators and filters over a range of 500 MHz to 20 GHz. This article is a review of the thin-film resonator (TFR) technology that describes the core structures and issues and gives examples of filters and resonators that have been manufactured or demonstrated. View full abstract»

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  • Safety standards for human exposure to radio frequency radiation and their biological rationale

    Page(s): 22 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (282 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Exposure guidelines for RF radiation have been promulgated for nearly half a century. However, our understanding of biological effects of exposure to RF radiation is still evolving and more so for cellular mobile telephones and wireless personal communication devices. There are two different sets of guidelines promulgated for limiting human exposure to RF radiation, worldwide. Currently, there is a backdrop of persistent, publicly expressed lack of confidence in radio-frequency (RF) exposure standards, pertaining to the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) level of humans exposed to RF electromagnetic radiation. Much of the current effort is driven by the advent of cellular mobile telephony, which uses RF radiation in the range of 800-2,500 MHz. The setting of guidelines or standards for maximum permissible levels of exposure to RF and microwave radiation is a valid approach to managing the risk of such exposures. The existing guidelines, however, are based on results obtained from acute, short-term studies that are atypical of the RF exposures associated with the handset of cellular mobile telephones. For the first time in human history, a source of RF radiation is located right next to the head of millions of cellular mobile telephone users. Biological effects after repeated, prolonged, or lifelong exposure to RF energy emitted by these low-power wireless telecommunication devices have been investigated only during the past few years. The existing scientific results are equivocal and arguable in many respects. Consequently, there remains a widespread public concern about the adequacy of existing guidelines in safeguarding the general population against possible harm of RF radiation from cellular mobile telephones. View full abstract»

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  • Wireless local positioning

    Page(s): 77 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1157 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Local positioning will be one of the most exciting features of the next generation of wireless systems. Completely new concepts and features for wireless data transmission and transponder systems will emerge. Self-organizing sensor networks, ubiquitous computing, location sensitive billing, context dependent information services, tracking and guiding are only some of the numerous possible application areas. This article introduces different concepts of several existing and emerging systems and applications. View full abstract»

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  • A nobel prize in microwave engineering?

    Page(s): 6 - 8
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest editorial 2003: IEEE Radio and Wireless Conference (RAWCON) special issue

    Page(s): 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (186 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
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  • Early quasioptics of near-millimeter and submillimeter waves in IRE-Kharkov, Ukraine: from ideas to the microwave pioneer award

    Page(s): 32 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1178 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper is about the early quasioptics of near-millimeter and submillimeter waves in IRE-Kharkov (Institute of Radio Physics and Electronics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine) and the development of the hollow dielectric beam-waveguide (HDB) technology and measuring techniques of the near-millimeter and submillimeter wavelength ranges, with main application in hot plasma diagnostics. It presents the details of the development based on the declassified reports and the interviews of Y.M. Kuleshov and another key member of the quasioptics (QO) team, M. S. Yanovski. Y.M. Kuleshov and his team had already accumulated rich experience in developing waveguide measuring devices in the whole millimeter-wave range between 1954 and 1961. In 1994-1996, the research project "Ozero" was carried out with Y.M. Kuleshov as a principal investigator. The aim of the "Ozero" was to explore the feasibility of developing a kit of HDB-based measuring devices in the wavelength range /spl lambda/ = 0.7 to 1.7 mm. After the finish of "Ozero", in 1968-1971, the next R&D project called "Oliva" was granted by the same directorate of MRI. Its idea was to dwell on and refine the polarization principles in the measuring circuits for /spl lambda/ = 0.5-0.8 mm. HDB was patented only in 1969. Since the 1970s, the activities of the QO department were focused entirely on the development of HDB-based instruments and systems. Here, the major application area was hot plasma diagnostics in new large Tokamaks. They also dwelled in the development of the measuring techniques including reflectometry and polarimetry. Other HDB based systems elaborated in IRE include radars in the 1970-1980s and RCS testing ranges in the 1990s. View full abstract»

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  • Accurate modeling of monolithic inductors using conformal meshing for reduced computation

    Page(s): 87 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (686 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Accurate component modeling is a key factor to successful wireline and wireless circuit design in Si/SiGe BiCMOS and RF CMOS. This article presents the application of two planar electromagnetic simulation methods for reducing the memory and computation time requirement for accurate simulation of inductors fabricated with thick analog metal layers. First, a conformal subsectioning technique is briefly discussed in the context of reducing the numerical complexity of octagonal and circular spiral inductor analysis. Second, this article discusses a method for determining if more than a two-sheet model of thick metals is needed for accurate inductor simulation. Finally, the conformal mesh is applied to a 3.3-nH inductor fabricated using the IBM 0.13-μm RF CMOS process technology. The simulated and measured results are compared. View full abstract»

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  • Filter design by transmission zeros [Book Review]

    Page(s): 98 - 99
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (308 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • RF circuit fundamentals I [Book Review]

    Page(s): 99 - 100
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (298 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Some thoughts on microwave education

    Page(s): 112 - 114
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (254 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
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  • IMS 2003 Awards

    Page(s): 119
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author Index

    Page(s): 137 - 138
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Page(s): 138 - 141
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Microwave Magazine is intended to serve primarily as a source of information of interest to professionals in the field of microwave theory and techniques.

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Editor-in-Chief
John Wood
Maxim Integrated Products, Inc.

San Jose, CA      USA
john.wood@ieee.org
Phone:+1 480 577 0927