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Network, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan/Feb 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • A methodology for the design of distributed search in P2P middleware

    Page(s): 30 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (880 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Important research efforts are being conducted in the area of search, lookup, and routing, and are even increasing in the quest for P2P middleware that is both scalable and decentralized. To structure and classify current as well as facilitate and give direction to future research, this methodology proposes a top-down two-dimensional design space. This design space has been developed for exhaustiveness so as to cover all possible design options, existing or yet to be conceived. A comprehensive survey of P2P search systems serves as a reference for the reader while at the same time validating the framework. An identification of areas in the design space not covered by current systems leads to the design of a novel peer-to-peer-based keyword routing scheme. Finally, an evaluation of possible design options along the most important requirement will help guide system designers. View full abstract»

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  • Network Management, MlBs and MPLS [Book Review]

    Page(s): 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (206 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A self-organizing publish/subscribe middleware for dynamic peer-to-peer networks

    Page(s): 38 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (632 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Peer-to-peer needs new middleware technologies and counterparts to the widely established CORBA, EJB, COM+, and messaging systems products. Specially designed middleware would release the advantages of peer-to-peer networks to a broad spectrum of applications. Network-specific advantages like scalability, fault tolerance, and resource availability could easily be utilized without any concerns about their underlying infrastructure and resources. We address this need with our P2P Messaging System, which focuses on high-performance group communication based on a publish/subscribe model. The P2P Messaging System considers the heterogeneous and dynamic character of peer-to-peer networks by an augmented topology and its supporting features. The P2P Messaging System was evaluated by experimental benchmark tests, and the results provide evidence of its efficiency and scalability. View full abstract»

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  • Middleware to support sensor network applications

    Page(s): 6 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (809 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Current trends in computing include increases in both distribution and wireless connectivity, leading to highly dynamic, complex environments on top of which applications must be built. The task of designing and ensuring the correctness of applications in these environments is similarly becoming more complex. The unified goal of much of the research in distributed wireless systems is to provide higher-level abstractions of complex low-level concepts to application programmers, easing the design and implementation of applications. A new and growing class of applications for wireless sensor networks require similar complexity encapsulation. However, sensor networks have some unique characteristics, including dynamic availability of data sources and application quality of service requirements, that are not common to other types of applications. These unique features, combined with the inherent distribution of sensors, and limited energy and bandwidth resources, dictate the need for network functionality and the individual sensors to be controlled to best serve the application requirements. In this article, we describe different types of sensor network applications and discuss existing techniques for managing these types of networks. We also overview a variety of related middleware and argue that no existing approach provides all the management tools required by sensor network applications. To meet this need, we have developed a new middleware called MiLAN. MiLAN allows applications to specify a policy for managing the network and sensors, but the actual implementation of this policy is effected within MiLAN. We describe MiLAN and show its effectiveness through the design of a sensor-based personal health monitor. View full abstract»

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  • Managing distributed objects in peer-to-peer systems

    Page(s): 22 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (755 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Peer-to-peer systems that dynamically organize, interact and share resources are increasingly being deployed in large-scale environments. The location, intermittent connectivity, and organization of the peers have significant impact on meeting the quality of service requirements of distributed applications. This article presents the design, implementation, and empirical evaluation of a middleware architecture for managing distributed objects in peer-to-peer systems. The architecture consists of a self-organizing infrastructure that uses only local knowledge to dynamically form overlays of multiple peers and respond to changing processing and networking conditions; and a management layer that monitors the behavior of the applications transparently, schedules object invocations over multiple machines, and obtains accurate resource projections. The system works in a two-level feedback loop structure that uses measurements of elapsed time and resource loads to refine the initial estimates and revise the peer connections. Our empirical evaluation shows that the system manipulates the peer connections dynamically in response to changes in resource utilization to meet application end-to-end soft real-time requirements. View full abstract»

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  • Reflective middleware for integrating network monitoring with adaptive object messaging

    Page(s): 56 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (972 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the future, applications will need to execute in a ubiquitous environment with varying network conditions (connectivity, bandwidth, etc.) and system constraints (e.g., power and storage). The distributed object paradigm is often used to facilitate the development of large-scale distributed applications. However, the traditional object messaging layer operates with limited awareness of underlying system and network conditions, whereas current system and network monitoring tools operate at the network layer with little awareness of application-level object communication requirements. This article explores the possibility, mechanisms and benefits of filling the gap between object messaging and system monitoring. We introduce connection abstraction as the mechanism for these two layers to communicate and exchange information. Through this integration, object messaging can proactively adapt to changing system conditions; system monitoring policies and parameters can be optimized based on interobject communication properties. View full abstract»

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  • Infiniband Network Architecture [Book Review]

    Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Issues in designing middleware for wireless sensor networks

    Page(s): 15 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (801 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless sensor networks are being developed for a variety of applications. With the continuing advances in network and application design, appropriate middleware is needed to provide both standardized and portable system abstractions, and the capability to support and coordinate concurrent applications on sensor networks. In this article, we first identify several design principles for such middleware. These principles motivate a cluster-based lightweight middleware framework that separates application semantics from the underlying hardware, operating system, and network infrastructure. We propose a layered architecture for each cluster that consists of a cluster control layer and a resource management layer. Key design issues and related challenges within this framework that deserve further investigation are outlined. Finally, we discuss a technique for energy-efficient resource allocation in a single-hop cluster, which serves as a basic primitive for the development of the resource management layer. View full abstract»

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  • Composite event detection as a generic middleware extension

    Page(s): 44 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (983 KB)  

    Event-based communication provides a flexible and robust approach to monitoring and managing large-scale distributed systems. Composite event detection extends the scope and flexibility of these systems by allowing application components to express interest in complex patterns of events. This makes it possible to handle the large numbers of events generated in Internet-wide systems, and in network monitoring and pervasive computing applications. In this article, we introduce a novel generic composite event detection framework that can be added on top of existing middleware architectures, as demonstrated in our implementation over JMS. We argue that the framework is flexible, expressive and easy to implement. Based on finite state automata extended with a rich time model and parameterization support, it provides a decomposable core language for specifying composite events. This allows detection to be distributed automatically throughout the system, guided by distribution policies that control the quality of service. Finally, tests show that using our composite event system over JMS can reduce bandwidth consumption while maintaining low notification delay for composite events. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Network

    Page(s): 0_1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Page(s): 66 - 68
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Page(s): 68 - 71
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Optical Communications - Call for papers

    Page(s): 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (60 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Radio Communications - Call for papers

    Page(s): 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (116 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo