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Computer

Issue 11 • Date Nov. 1988

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Appendum to 'Multiple-valued logic: a tutorial and appreciation' (April 1988 17-27)

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    The commenter points out a possible error in the section on storage techniques in the above mentioned article (see ibid., vol.21, p.17-27, April 1988). He explains why the error was made.<> View full abstract»

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  • The Programmer's Apprentice: a research overview

    Page(s): 10 - 25
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    The long-term goal of the Programmer's Apprentice project is to develop a theory of how expert programmers analyze, synthesize, modify, explain, specify, verify, and document programs. The authors present their vision of the Programmer's Apprentice, the principles and techniques underlying it, and their progress toward it. The primary vehicle for this exposition is three scenarios illustrating the use of the Apprentice in three phases of the programming task: implementation, design, and requirements. The first scenario is taken from a completed working prototype. The second and third scenarios are the targets for prototype systems currently under construction.<> View full abstract»

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  • Reducing contention in shared-memory multiprocessors

    Page(s): 26 - 37
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    The techniques that can be used to design a memory system that reduces the impact of contention are examined. To exemplify the techniques, the implementations and the design decisions taken in each are reviewed. The discussion covers memory organization, interconnection networks, memory allocation, cache memory, and synchronization and contention. The multiprocessor implementations considered are C.mmp, CM*, RP3, Alliant FX, Cedar, Butterfly, SPUR, Dragon, Multimax, and Balance.<> View full abstract»

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  • Using inspections to investigate program correctness

    Page(s): 38 - 44
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    An approach to inspections is proposed that would emphasize the search for correctness. It would hold up to scrutiny to not only what is on the page, but also the thought behind the representation. Inspectors would investigate how the program developed, looking for evidence of disciplined methods in its construction, adequate consideration of the error domain, and the program's ability to withstand years of use and inevitable change. An example inspection is given that uses a program developed according to IBM's design methods. The inspection presents the arguments as a series of questions that the inspectors would ask the author and themselves.<> View full abstract»

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  • A taxonomy for computer architectures

    Page(s): 46 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1242 KB)  

    A taxonomy is presented that extends M.J. Flynn's (IEEE Trans.Comput., vol. C-21, no.9, p.948-60, Sept. 1972), especially in the multiprocessor category. It is a two-level hierarchy in which the upper level classifies architectures based on the number of processors for data and for instructions and the interconnections between them. A lower level can be used to distinguish variants even more precisely; it is based on a state-machine view of processors. The author suggests why taxonomies are useful in studying architecture and shows how this applies to a number of modern architectures.<> View full abstract»

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Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
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