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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Possible power generation with nature's high-efficiency technology

    Page(s): 13 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (426 KB)  

    The rapidly growing fuel consumption in engines and turbine that power the world's transportation vehicles and power-generation plants will nearly exhaust the world's supply of petroleum by the end of the next century. These engines and turbines run at high heat-input temperatures because their efficiency is limited by the Carnot cycle. Muscles used for propulsion by animals are not limited in efficiency by the Carnot cycle, so we see dolphins getting 3,000 miles of travel from a food quantity that contains the energy equivalent of one gallon of gasoline. Leaves on plants capture the energy in sunlight to extract carbon from carbon dioxide in the air, and hydrogen form water, to manufacture carbohydrates. Scientists and engineers studying these processes are amazed by the computing power and data storage required to make these processes work. For example, a tiny grape seed contains the data and structural technology required for quickly constructing the plant's fuel-producing leaves and the structures that support them. Even the stiff thorn that discourages intruders from entering the grape bush has an effective design. The data stored in the seed specifies the color of the grape plant's blossoms, commands the production of the sugar-containing fluid that goes into the grapes, and even the data content of the next-generation seeds in the globules of each grape berry. In this report, we explore energy-conversion processes that nature has developed in plants and animals. We explore the possibility of adapting them into techniques that reduce our consumption of petroleum fuels. View full abstract»

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  • Variable frequency switching in power supply EMI-control: an overview

    Page(s): 18 - 22
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    Spreading the signal spectrum is a widely used technique in telecommunication applications. Variable-frequency and spread spectrum modulation methods can also be utilized in power electronic applications to improve electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC). This paper gives an overview to variable-frequency techniques in power electronics with experimental results. View full abstract»

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  • Radar in the Soviet Union and Russia: a brief historical outline

    Page(s): 8 - 12
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    This paper outlines the historical development of radar in the Soviet Union and Russia. Emphasis was given to only two classes of radars: surveillance radars for air defense (AD) systems; and radars for surface-to-air missile (SAM) systems. View full abstract»

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  • Mapping lightning channels in a thunderstorm by radar

    Page(s): 4 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (411 KB)  

    The state of Georgia has experienced a number of tornados that occur without warning, and, in several cases have caused fatalities. Researchers at the Severe Storms Research Center (SSRC) of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), Georgia Institute of Technology are attempting to detect tornado formation within severe thunderstorms occurring in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia, using non-radar sensors that may provide early tornado warning and provide cueing to existing National Weather Service (NWS) radars. The goal of these studies is to increase the warning time of tornado formation within the parent thunderstorm. GTRI researchers use real-time S-band Doppler weather radar data from three National Weather Service WSR-88D NEXRAD radars to complement the development of the non-radar tornado sensors. Three NWS Doppler radars provide severe weather surveillance coverage of the north Georgia area to determine if a thunderstorm contains the Doppler signature that indicates tornado formation. The radar data, displayed on a work station developed and optimized for tornado detection by the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), serves as ground truth data for the non-radar sensor development. GTRI can display cloud to ground (CG) lightning strikes, a capability provided by overlaying data from a national monitoring network onto the radar reflectivity map. GTRI also uses a local lightning direction finder (DF) system that supplies azimuth and range to the lightning strike. This paper discusses the early lightning channel research and the passive parasitic radar system being operated by the SSRC. View full abstract»

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  • Author Index

    Page(s): 37 - 39
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Page(s): 39 - 48
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
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