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Computing in Science & Engineering

Issue 1 • Date Jan-Feb 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 24 of 24
  • Global weather prediction and high-end computing at NASA

    Page(s): 29 - 35
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    The authors demonstrate the current capabilities of NASA's finite-volume General Circulation Model in high-resolution global weather prediction and discuss its development path in the foreseeable future. This model is a prototype of a future NASA Earth-modeling system intended to unify development activities across various disciplines within NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): 17
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  • Developing Earth system science knowledge to manage Earth's natural resources

    Page(s): 45 - 51
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    The computational science and engineering communities can build an infrastructure to use the observations, computational models, and knowledge about Earth system science to enable decision support for the global, national, regional, and local management of the Earth's natural resources. A proposed architecture for an Earth resources management infrastructure based on a NASA approach is presented. The infrastructure uses observations, model outputs, climate data records, and various other data types as inputs. These comprehensive data sets and model outputs synthesize with domain knowledge to create outcomes that affect policies for managing the Earth's natural resources. View full abstract»

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  • XML and computational science

    Page(s): 74 - 80
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    The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a specification for document interchange that the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) developed in 1998. In many ways, XML is the lingua franca among programming language enthusiasts, and proponents argue that it could potentially solve the multitude of data management and analysis problems the entire computing industry currently faces. XML might make a real difference, especially in computing, engineering, and the mathematical sciences, in part because we can use it with different languages. The author presents some background and lightweight examples of XML usage, describes some XML component frameworks along with their purpose and applicability to computational science, and discusses some technical obstacles to overcome for the language to be taken seriously in computational science. View full abstract»

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  • Illuminating Earth's interior through advanced computing

    Page(s): 36 - 44
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    Today's computational strategies for modeling Earth's interior structure and dynamics come from high-performance computing systems in the US and others such as the Japanese Earth Simulator. Modeling efforts currently underway focus on problems such as geodynamo and earthquake modeling. Space-based measurement and observational technologies are revolutionizing our understanding of the solid Earth and revealing subtle changes that occur on regional and global scales. Understanding these complex processes requires large global data sets and sophisticated computational models coupled with the necessary associated computational infrastructure. The authors discuss how the rapidly increasing availability of data and a more robust and pervasive computational infrastructure could combine to give us new opportunities to understand this complex system. View full abstract»

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  • Preclinical development forum

    Page(s): 0_2
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  • Models of infection: person to person

    Page(s): 68 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (295 KB)  

    When faced with a spreading infection, public health workers want to predict its path and severity so they can make decisions about vaccination strategies, quarantine policy, and the use of public health resources. This is true whether the pathogen's dispersion is natural (for example, the spread of influenza in 1918) or deliberate (for example, the spread of anthrax via terrorism). Effective mathematical models can help us test a public health policy's potential outcome and initiate an effective response. In this problem, we focus on a simplified model of the spread of an infection and develop some tools that lend insight into its behavior. To make our problem as easy as possible, we impose some rather artificial assumptions. Suppose we have nm patients in a hospital ward and that their beds are arranged as n rows of m beds. For convenience, we'll let m be an even number. Suppose also that one of the patients, the one in bed m/2 in row [n/2], becomes infected and can infect any patient in a neighboring bed. How will this infection spread through the ward? The article presents a Markov model and a Monte Carlo simulation to solve this problem. View full abstract»

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  • Say every word on every slide

    Page(s): 3 - 4
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  • Making scientific applications as Web services

    Page(s): 93 - 96
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    This article discusses the general architecture of science portal-service systems and illustrates with a simple example how you could build a constituent service out of a particular application. To make the presentation concrete, we develop a simple wrapper application for a code, Disloc (authored by A. Donnellan of the NASA jet Propulsion Laboratory), which is used in earthquake simulation to calculate surface displacements of observation stations for a given underground fault. Disloc's fast calculation is a particularly useful characteristic because we can provide it as an anonymous service and not have to worry about computer accounts, allocations, and scheduling. View full abstract»

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  • A short guide to predator-prey lattice models

    Page(s): 62 - 66
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    In broad terms, a predator-prey model describes the dynamics of two kinds of entities: specifically, one kind could be destroyed on contact with the other. The review contains no detailed formulas, model descriptions, or techniques; rather, it presents the authors' assumptions, main results, and conclusions. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling geoscience data in a multisensory virtual environment

    Page(s): 89 - 92
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    In this article, the author describes his ongoing efforts to combine high-quality 3D graphics, haptics (from the Greek word haptesthai, to grasp or to touch), and sonification (the use of sound for "visualization") into multisensory systems to interactively manipulate geoscientific data. These systems could facilitate many complex tasks that geoscientists in academia and industry face today, lead to new insights, and solve problems in less time. This research applies to many different geoscience branches, but here the author focuses on the oil and gas industry because he spent the last five years working in this domain. While many large oil companies are using interactive visualization (with large stereo screens in virtual theaters), the author focuses more on the application of haptics, a type of virtual reality, and briefly touches on geoscientific data sonification, an extensive topic by itself. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling, simulation and visualization: the Pentagon on September 11th

    Page(s): 52 - 60
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    Researchers used a custom importer to simplify and load simulation data from the September 11th Pentagon attack into a commercial animation system. The resulting high-quality impact visualization combines state-of-the-art graphics with a state-of-the-art engineering simulation. View full abstract»

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  • The architecture of the Earth System Modeling Framework

    Page(s): 18 - 28
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    The Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) project is developing a standard software platform for Earth system models. The standard, which defines a component architecture and a support infrastructure, is being developed under open-software practices. Target applications range from operational numerical weather prediction to climate-system change and predictability studies. View full abstract»

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  • Solving mathematical exercises that involve symbolic computations

    Page(s): 81 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (393 KB)  

    Using Mathematica, we recently developed MathEdu, an authoring tool based on a programming-by-demonstration paradigm. Students can use it in two ways: as a tutor that shows them how to solve specific problems corresponding to previously defined patterns, or to solve specific problems interactively with the tool while it controls the resolution process. MathEdu allows a degree of interactivity that no other tool with a similar purpose has achieved. We illustrate this last claim by briefly reviewing the most advanced tutoring systems currently representing mathematical concepts by means of symbolic information. We also describe the three core modules in MathEdu: MathSolver, MathDesigner, and MathTrainer. View full abstract»

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  • Caveat emptor - what to know before trying to beat a consumer system into a scientific instrument

    Page(s): 5 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1252 KB)  

    The authors review a technological process and describe the lessons learned from engaging in it. On the surface, the main issues are the trade-offs in developing a "product", in this case, a directionally sensitive light sensor for environmental monitoring applications, using either a "build it" or "buy it" approach. The design criteria include performance specifications for resolution, robustness, and scalability, but the bottom line is cost. View full abstract»

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  • Computing in Science and Engineering

    Page(s): 0_1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New for 2004

    Page(s): 12
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society library subscription plan-electronic

    Page(s): 61
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2004 Editorial calendar

    Page(s): 67
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial 2004

    Page(s): 97
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Computing in Science & Engineering presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
George K. Thiruvathukal
Loyola University