Notification:
We are currently experiencing intermittent issues impacting performance. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2003

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Content delivery networks: status and trends

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 68 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (74)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (438 KB)  

    CDNs improve network performance and offer fast and reliable applications and services by distributing content to cache servers located close to users. The Web's growth has transformed communications and business services such that speed, accuracy, and availability of network-delivered content has become absolutely critical - both on their own terms and in terms of measuring Web performance. Proxy servers partially address the need for rapid content delivery by providing multiple clients with a shared cache location. In this context, if a requested object exists in a cache (and the cached version has not expired), clients get a cached copy, which typically reduces delivery time. CDNs act as trusted overlay networks that offer high-performance delivery of common Web objects, static data, and rich multimedia content by distributing content load among servers that are close to the clients. CDN benefits include reduced origin server load, reduced latency for end users, and increased throughput. CDNs can also improve Web scalability and disperse flash-crowd events. Here we offer an overview of the CDN architecture and popular CDN service providers. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Web services are not distributed objects

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 59 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (54)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (566 KB)  

    Web services are frequently described as the latest incarnation of distributed object technology. This misconception, perpetuated by people from both industry and academia, seriously limits broader acceptance of the true Web services architecture. Although the architects of many distributed and Internet systems have been vocal about the differences between Web services and distributed objects, dispelling the myth that they are closely related appears difficult. Many believe that Web services is a distributed systems technology that relies on some form of distributed object technology. Unfortunately, this is not the only common misconception about Web services. We seek to clarify several widely held beliefs about the technology that are partially or completely wrong. Within the distributed technology world, it is probably more appropriate to associate Web services with messaging technologies because they share a common architectural view, although they address different application types. Web services technology will have a dramatic enabling effect on worldwide interoperable distributed computing once everyone recognizes that Web services are about interoperable document-centric computing, not distributed objects. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The sentient Web

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 82 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (319 KB)  

    In a startling revelation, a team of university scientists has reported that a network of computers has become conscious and sentient, and is beginning to assume control of online information system. In spite of the ominous tone typically chosen for dramatic effect, a sentient Web would be more helpful and much easier for people to use. An agent is an active, persistent software component that perceives, reasons, and acts, and whose actions include communication. Agents inherently take intentional actions based on sensory information and memories of past actions. All agents have necessary communication ability, but they do not necessarily possess introspective capabilities or awareness of place and time. Four things characterize being sentient Web conscious: 1) knowing 2) having intentions 3) introspecting and 4) experiencing phenomena. For the first two, it is easy to show that most Web entities possess and demonstrate the use of knowledge, and other entities, including Web services, exhibit intentions. The last two, introspection and phenomenal experience, are facets of awareness and are not as obvious in current Web systems, so we will consider them more thoroughly and conclude with future prospects. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Authentication and its privacy effects

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 54 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (307 KB)  

    As communications and computer technologies ingrain themselves further into our lives, we're asked to authenticate ourselves in a variety of ways, using increasingly sophisticated authentication systems. Most of this authentication requires personal information, which raises many privacy concerns. The US National Academies' Committee on Authentication Technologies and Their Privacy Implications recently issued its second report, who goes there? Authentication through the lens of privacy, to address the set of issues that personal authentication elicits. We summarize some of the highlights and key insights from that report. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Application-level QoS control for video-on-demand

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 16 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (508 KB)  

    User requirements and device heterogeneity call for Web services with differentiated quality of service (QoS). In particular, services with response-time constraints, such as video-on-demand (VoD), require the differentiation, control, and dynamic adaptation of QoS. Service providers and network operators need methodologies and mechanisms for managing runtime QoS. Using mobile agent technology, the ubiQoS middleware supports QoS tailoring and adaptation of video-on-demand flows in response to user preferences and terminal properties. The design, implementation, and deployment of QoS-aware Internet services can significantly benefit from a middleware approach at the application level. Our experimental results show the feasibility of application-level middleware solutions based on code mobility for Internet VoD services with differentiated QoS. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analysis of liberty single-sign-on with enabled clients

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 38 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (19)  |  Patents (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (300 KB)  

    Web single-sign-on protocols-such as Microsoft passport, Oasis's security assertion markup language (SAML), and the Internet2 project Shibboleth, aim to solve security problems by letting individuals log in to many Internet services while authenticating only once, or at least always in the same way. Enterprises hope that single-sign-on protocols will significantly decrease customer-care costs due to forgotten passwords and increase e-commerce transactions by enhancing the user experience. Commercial interest centers on distributed enterprises and on small federations of enterprises with existing business relationships, such as supply chains. We concentrate on the liberty-enabled client and proxy (LECP) profile. The LECP protocol assumes a special protocol-aware client (the enabled client). We also consider the design of security protocols based on XML and Web services. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Model-driven trust negotiation for Web services

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 45 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (24)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (447 KB)  

    Trust negotiation is an approach to access control whereby access is granted based on trust established in a negotiation between the service requester and the service provider. Trust negotiation systems avoid several problems facing traditional access control models such as DAC (discretionary access control) and MAC (mandatory access control). Another problem is that Web service providers often do not know requesters identities in advance because of the ubiquitousness of services. We describe Trust-Serv, a trust negotiation framework for Web services, which features a policy language based on state machines. It is supported by lifecycle management and automated runtime enforcement tools. Credential retrieval and validation in Trust-Serv rely on predefined Web services that provide interactions with attribute assertion authorities and public key infrastructure. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Web server software architectures

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 78 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (345 KB)  

    Web site scalability depends on several things - workload characteristics, security mechanisms, Web cluster architectures as we discussed previously. Another important item that can affect a site's performance and scalability is the Web server software architecture. We provide a classification of Web server architectures, offer a quantitative analysis of some possible software architectural options, and discuss the importance of software contention on overall response time. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Managing multiple and dependable identities

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 29 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (406 KB)  

    Digital management of multiple robust identities is a crucial issue in developing the next generation of distributed applications. Our daily activities increasingly rely on remote resources and services - specifically, on interactions between different, remotely located parties. Because these parties might (and sometimes should) know little about each other, digital identities - electronic representations of individuals' or organizations' sensitive information - help introduce them to each other and control the amount of information transferred. In its broadest sense, identity management encompasses definitions and life-cycle management for digital identities and profiles, as well as environments for exchanging and validating such information. Digital identity management - especially support for identity dependability and multiplicity - is crucial for building and maintaining trust relationships in today's globally interconnected society. We investigate the problems inherent in identity management, emphasizing the requirements for multiplicity and dependability. We enable a new generation of advanced MDDI services on the global information infrastructure. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Is the Internet going NUTSS?

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 94 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (269 KB)  

    For nearly 10 years now, the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) and Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) have been telling us that the pool of available IP addresses will soon be exhausted, and that Internet growth will come to a grinding halt. They have heavily promoted their solution, IPv6, which the commercial world has all but ignored. It is now becoming clear that IP address exhaustion is years off, at best. The primary reason for this is network address translation (NAT), the rogue technology that allows almost unlimited address reuse. Despite NAT's nagging technical problems that limit IP connectivity and make peer-to-peer (P2P) applications difficult to deploy, the commercial world has universally embraced the technology even as the IAB and IETF actively discourage its use. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • New acceleration technologies might not be fool's gold

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 7 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (535 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Has VoIP arrived?

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 10 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (369 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Identity management

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 26 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (467 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Integration with Web services

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 75 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (36)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (267 KB)  

    There's a difference between what we'd like our enterprise computing systems to be and what they really are. We like to envision them as orderly multitier arrangements comprising software buses, hubs, gateways, and adapters - all deployed at just the right places to maximize scale, load, application utility, and ultimately, business value. Unfortunately, we know that there's a wide gulf between this idealistic vision and reality. In practice, our enterprise computing systems typically are tangles of numerous technologies, protocols, and applications, often hastily hard-wired together with inflexible point-to-point connections. The whole point of middleware is to hide the diversity and complexity of the computing machinery underneath it. By adopting the abstractions that middleware provides, we're supposedly isolating our applications from the variety of ever-changing hardware platforms, operating systems, networks, protocols, and transports that make up our enterprise computing systems. We can use Web services to provide "middleware for middleware" abstraction layer for modern integration applications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Special thanks to IC's reviewers

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 86 - 87
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (253 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 88 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (492 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 91 - 93
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University