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Computer

Issue 11 • Date Nov. 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Next-generation wearable networks

    Page(s): 31 - 39
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    Increased research in microelectronics, wireless communications, and human-computer interaction, particularly augmented-reality applications, has made a symbiotic system technically feasible. Wearable computing, or wearware, focuses on making this technology useful in everyday life, particularly for integrating contextual data with the Internet to automate mundane tasks. The availability of portable, energy-efficient computing devices that can be easily integrated with clothing has renewed interest in the possibilities of wearware. The notion of a wearable network of interactive devices aiding users in their day-to-day activities is extremely appealing, but for it to become a reality researchers must develop interesting and useful applications. Consumers are not interested in the technology per se but in how it could enrich their lives. View full abstract»

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  • Weblogs: simplifying web publishing

    Page(s): 114 - 116
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    A weblog - blog, for short - is a Web site that uses a dated log format to publish periodical information. The updates are frequent, usually daily, according to the site owner's editorial purposes - or whims. Blogs contribute to Web content by linking and filtering evolving content in a structured way and by establishing interlinked communities - the blogosphere - connecting people through shared interests. Bloggers can link to news feeds, personal journals, and topic-specific blogs of almost every sort. Blogging systems are emerging tools that make it easier to set up a blog; to update, distribute, and archive its information; and to enhance its functionality. View full abstract»

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  • Designing safety-critical computer systems

    Page(s): 40 - 46
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    The ubiquitous computer is the electronic component of choice for system developers, who increasingly exploit computing's power in safety-critical applications such as steer-by-wire automotive systems and powered prosthetics. However, these computer-based systems raise the ongoing concern that they might fail and cause harm. Exploring the systematic design of safety-critical computer systems helps to show how engineers can verify that these designs will be safe. Achieving risk reduction requires dealing with all the system's components: hardware and software, sensors, effectors, the operator, and the primary source of harmful energy or toxicity: the application. View full abstract»

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  • Artificial intelligence: arrogance or ignorance?

    Page(s): 120, 118 - 119
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (428 KB)  

    Whether the computing profession is ill-informed about natural intelligence or not, there are good arguments for dropping the term artificial intelligence as a name for the nifty programming field. The Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (www.oed.com), defines algorist as a descriptor for a nifty programmer, but deems the word obsolete. Here, then, we have a word ripe for reanimation. The derived term, algoristics, would make a highly suitable replacement for artificial intelligence, being more correct historically than the corrupt algorithmics. Placing this renamed field alongside statistics and logistics, as a branch of mathematics, would benefit the computing profession greatly. Given that algoristic techniques are highly mathematical and require a much greater degree of mathematical knowledge than ordinary programming, they should be taught and studied primarily by mathematicians. View full abstract»

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  • Formal methods in embedded design

    Page(s): 104 - 106
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    For more than two decades, applied formal methods have remained the unexplored frontier of embedded system design - just beyond the reach of practice. There have been inroads, certainly, but no sign of a revolution -even a quiet one - in industry. Considering the rapid progress of technology over this time, the dynamic expansion of applications, and the meager investment in formal methods, just keeping pace with the advancing frontier speaks pretty well for the research. Having watched these trends over the years, I would not forecast any dramatic changes in practice. We should be looking for a sea change, not a revolution. Formal methods have a cumulative impact, reflected in languages and "informal" methods as much as in automated reasoning tools. View full abstract»

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  • Will fuel cells replace batteries in mobile devices?

    Page(s): 10 - 12
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    No matter how much wireless vendors improve their processors, memory systems, and networks, it does no good if a mobile device's battery dies or has such a short life that users are virtually tethered to an electrical outlet. With this in mind, researchers are seeking to improve portable-power technology, and many are exploring a single alternative: fuel cells. View full abstract»

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  • Scaling Web services with capacity provision networks

    Page(s): 64 - 72
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    With the increasing proliferation of c-commerce and e-business activities, many service providers are turning to Web caching solutions to move important content and processes closer to end users. Uncertainties in user demand and rapid market changes pose significant impediments to effective cache planning and deployment solutions, however. The authors have developed capacity provision networks to support a specific type of Web caching in the vertical segment of ISPs, NSPs, and similar entities. In this scenario, an entity can be a provider at one time and a user at another, depending on cache capacity requirements. View full abstract»

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  • The information systems research cycle

    Page(s): 111 - 113
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    What distinguishes information systems from closely aligned disciplines such as computer science, organizational science, management science, economics, or systems engineering? How does IS research balance the demands of relevance and rigor to make effective contributions to both theory and practice? As senior researchers in IS, the authors have engaged in many debates on these questions and have come to some conclusions about what makes this burgeoning field unique and how to properly plan, execute, and evaluate IS research as well as transition it into practice. View full abstract»

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  • SCTP: a proposed standard for robust Internet data transport

    Page(s): 56 - 63
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    The stream control transmission protocol (SCTP) is an evolving general purpose Internet transport protocol designed to bridge the gap between TCP and UDP. SCTP evolved from a telephony signaling protocol for IP networks and is now a proposed standard with the Internet Engineering Task Force. Like TCP, SCTP provides a reliable, full-duplex connection and mechanisms to control network congestion. However, SCTP expands transport layer possibilities beyond TCP and UDP, offering new delivery options that are particularly desirable for telephony signaling and multimedia applications. View full abstract»

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  • Data mining for very busy people

    Page(s): 22 - 29
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    Most modern businesses can access mountains of data electronically; the trick is effectively using that data. In practice, this means summarizing large data sets to find the data that really matters. Most data miners are zealous hunters seeking detailed summaries and generating extensive and lengthy descriptions. The authors take a different approach and assume that busy people don't need, or can't use complex models. Rather, they want only the data they need to achieve the most benefits. Instead of finding extensive descriptions of things, their data mining tool hunts for a minimal difference set between things because they believe a list of essential differences is easier to read and understand than detailed descriptions. View full abstract»

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  • Metadata standards for educational resources

    Page(s): 107 - 109
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    In the 1990s, recognition of the potential economies of reusing educational materials spawned the development of metadata standards for sharing and storing learning objects. Metadata is data that describes a physical or electronic resource and can be used to manage collections of documents, images, and other information in a repository such as an archive or museum. Some metadata elements, such as title, description, subject, and keywords, are similar to those that libraries use to catalog their holdings. Other elements, such as the uniform resource identifier (URI), are specific to a digital, Web-based environment. Metadata can be stored in a digital library or repository that provides services to search or browse for educational materials. The Dublin Core Metadata Element Set and IEEE Learning Object Metadata are two popular metadata standards that facilitate cataloging, searching, and reuse of such resources. View full abstract»

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  • Uncovering hidden contracts: the .NET example

    Page(s): 48 - 55
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    Software contracts take the form of routine preconditions, postconditions, and class invariants written into the program itself. The design by contract methodology uses such contracts for building each software element, an approach that is particularly appropriate for developing safety-critical software and reusable libraries. This methodology is a key design element of some existing libraries, especially the Eiffel Software development environment, which incorporates contract mechanisms in the programming language itself. Because the authors see the contract metaphor as inherent to quality software development, they undertook the work reported in the article as a sanity check to determine whether they see contracts everywhere simply because their development environment makes using them natural or whether contracts are intrinsically present, even when other designers don't express or even perceive them. They studied classes from the .NET collections library for implicit contracts and assessed improvements that might result from making them explicit. View full abstract»

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  • Statistical language approach translates into success

    Page(s): 14 - 16
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    Machine translation currently translates text from one language into another. However, work is under way on speech-to-speech translation. There are two kinds of machine translation: knowledge-based and statistical. Knowledge-based systems translate documents by converting words and grammar directly from one language into another. Rather than using the knowledge-based system's direct word-by-word translation techniques, statistical approaches translate documents by statistically analyzing entire phrases and, over time, "learning" how various languages work. The article examines the pros and cons of both systems, and predicts that statistical methods will become more popular, however the future will involve combining statistical and knowledge-based methods to create better systems. View full abstract»

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  • At random - How not to teach science

    Page(s): 7 - 9
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    First Page of the Article
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  • News briefs - Getting in touch with interactive haptic technology

    Page(s): 18
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • News briefs - Finding optical fiber in the deep blue sea

    Page(s): 18 - 19
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • News briefs - W3C works on semantic web proposal

    Page(s): 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (215 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington