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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Modeling cities one segment at a time

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 4 - 5
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    First Page of the Article
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  • 3D reconstruction and visualization [Guest Editors?? Introduction]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 20 - 21
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 102 - 105
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 105 - 111
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New methods for digital modeling of historic sites

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 32 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (18)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3015 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We discuss new methods for building 3D models of historic sites. Our algorithm automatically computes pairwise registrations between individual scans, builds a topological graph, and places the scans in the same frame of reference. View full abstract»

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  • Automatic generation of high-quality building models from lidar data

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 42 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (37)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1289 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Automating data acquisition for 3D city models is an important research topic in photogrammetry. In addition to techniques that rely on aerial images, generating 3D building models from point clouds provided. by light detection and ranging (Lidar) sensors is gaining importance. The progress in sensor technology has triggered this development. Airborne laser scanners can deliver dense point clouds with densities of up to one point per square meter. Using this information, it's possible to detect buildings and their approximate outlines and also to extract planar roof faces and create models that correctly resemble the roof structures. The author presents a method for automatically generating 3D building models from point clouds generated by the Lidar sensing technology. View full abstract»

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  • Why not make interfaces better than 3D reality?

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 12 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (782 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many constrained interfaces are designed to be simpler than the real world by restricting movement, limiting interface actions, and keeping interface objects in a plane. However, the strong utility of pure 3D interfaces for medical, architectural, product design, and scientific visualization means that interface design for pure 3D remains an important challenge. An intriguing possibility is that enhanced 3D interfaces might offer simpler navigation, more compelling functionality, safer movements, and less occlusion, than 3D reality, especially for information exploration and visualization tasks. Such features can enable superhuman capabilities such as faster-than-light teleportation, flying through objects, and X-ray vision. Enhanced 3D interfaces might have supernatural tools such as magic wands for instantly shrinking, enlarging, duplicating, or sending objects and enchanted environments that provide error prevention, history keeping, and programming-by-demonstration. Playful game designers and creative application developers have already pushed the technology further than those who seek merely to mimic reality. Advanced designs are marked by their support of rapid situation awareness through effective overviews, reduced numbers of actions to accomplish tasks; and prompt, meaningful feedback for user actions. This article reviews these clever enhanced 3D-design features and encourages approaches that facilitate user tasks rather than mimic reality. View full abstract»

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  • Sea of images

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 22 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (974 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Our sea of images approach provides new methods for acquiring, analyzing, representing, and rendering photorealistic models of complex indoor environments. We present our image-based rendering walk-through system based on the sea of images approach. We describe the system and give results for its implementation in three environments of different sizes and types. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling supernovae: braving a bold new frontier

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 6 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (853 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The death of a massive star, called a core collapse supernova, is among the most energetic events in the universe, exploding with so much force it can be compared to 1028 individual megaton bombs exploding at once. Researchers need powerful supercomputers capable of generating and storing terabytes and petabytes of data to simulate complex models. The US Department of Energy created the TeraScale Supernova Initiative (TSI) to do just that. The $9 million program - made up of the ORNL and eight US universities - aims to discover exactly how a supernova occurs. The scientists' charge is to perform 3D simulations of the radiation of the enormous amounts of neutrino energy and the resulting turbulent fluid flow that propels elements into space. So far, the team has generated 2D simulations, made possible because of terascale computers. They have created some 3D models, but not to the realistic detail the team needs. The team is using some of the most powerful types of computers available, capable of handling many terabytes of data. With these computers, 4,000 to 5,000 processor hours take just days - as opposed to months with a one-processor supercomputer. The team's computers include Seaborg, located at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Cheetah, located at the Center for Computational Science at ORNL, and Eagle, also located at ORNL. Use of these three computers and others like it have led to new discoveries by enabling multidimensional simulations. View full abstract»

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  • An ocularist's approach to human iris synthesis

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 70 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1041 KB)  

    We have a particularly fortunate situation in iris synthesis: artificial eye makers (ocularists) have developed a procedure for physical iris synthesis that results in eyes with all the important appearance characteristics of real eyes. They have refined this procedure over decades,and the performance of their products in the real world completely validates the approach. Our approach lets users (other than trained ocularists) create a realistic looking human eye, paying particular attention to the iris. We draw from domain knowledge provided by ocularists to provide a toolkit that composes a human iris by layering semitransparent textures. These textures look decidedly painted and unrealistic. The composited result, however, provides a sense of depth to the iris and takes on a level of realism that we believe others have not previously achieved. Prior work on rendering eyes has concentrated predominantly on producing geometry for facial animation or for medical applications. Some work has focused on accurately modeling the cornea. In contrast, the goal of our work is the easy creation of realistic looking irises for both the ocular prosthetics and entertainment industries. View full abstract»

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  • Lines in space. 5. A tale of two lines

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 84 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (511 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The author considers how two lines can interact, what geometric relationships they can have, and the algebraic indicators of those relationships (as expressed by tensor diagrams)? Three possibilities exist. Two lines can coincide, intersect, or be disjoint (skew). View full abstract»

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  • Multiperspective imaging

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 16 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1431 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Our eyes have evolved with perspective optics. Because of this, perspective images seem somewhat natural to our eyes; they're well tailored for human vision. In a perspective image, the objects close to us appear large and in detail, yet we enjoy sweeping wide-range views of distant scenery. Cameras have also evolved with perspective optics. It's natural for the optics of cameras to mimic the human eye. However, our perspective has some unfortunate shortcomings. In particular, our eyes have a limited field of view, and we can only see the world in front of us. Ideally, we could see in all directions at once. Additionally, we can only see one side of an object at a time. But suppose you could see all sides at the same time. In the last few years, some researchers (including ourselves) have investigated techniques that capture multiple perspectives into a single image - a problem known as multiperspective imaging. Multiperspective images are useful for several reasons. The ability to capture a panoramic field of view or both the front and back of an object leads to richer and more complete visualizations. At the same time, these images are well suited for processing in computer vision problems such as stereo reconstruction and motion analysis. The article presents an overview of our work in this area, and our view of multiperspective imaging in general. View full abstract»

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  • Approaches to large-scale urban modeling

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 62 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (42)  |  Patents (3)
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    Large-scale urban modeling technologies use a variety of sensors and data acquisition techniques. The authors categorize current approaches and describe their advantages and disadvantages. Their survey examines current research with respect to several performance criteria including data acquisition sources, user interaction level, geometric fidelity, model completeness, and intended applications. Although modeling systems vary with respect to these criteria, data acquisition strongly influences model characteristics and usefulness. We therefore cluster the methods into those based on photogrammetry, active sensors, and hybrid sensor systems. View full abstract»

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  • Everyday computer graphics

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 76 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3483 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    If AR becomes universal, then we can use it for casual, small things that will make our daily lives a bit easier. One of the more logical uses for AR is communication. For example, as many authors have observed, it would be handy to leave notes for each other in cyberspace, yet attach them to physical objects or locations. I suggest some of the applications that I'd like to have available for personal or individual use on an everyday basis. They communicate to users without text. Instead, graphics do all the work. View full abstract»

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  • Constructing 3D city models by merging aerial and ground views

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 52 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (34)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2134 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe an approach to register and merge detailed facade models with a complementary airborne model. The airborne modeling process provides a half-meter resolution model with a bird's-eye view of the entire area, containing terrain profile and building tops. The ground-based modeling process results in a detailed model of the building facades. Using the DSM obtained from airborne laser scans, we localize the acquisition vehicle and register the ground-based facades to the airborne model by means of Monte Carlo localization (MCL). We merge the two models with different resolutions to obtain a 3D model. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa