By Topic

Nuclear Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5  Part 1 • Date Oct. 2003

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • 2002 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium (NSS) and Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems

    Page(s): c1 - c4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Toward coherent neutrino detection using low-background micropattern gas detectors

    Page(s): 1285 - 1289
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (578 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The detection of low energy neutrinos (< few tens of MeV) via coherent nuclear scattering remains a holy grail of sorts in neutrino physics. This uncontroversial mode of interaction is expected to profit from a sizeable increase in cross section proportional to neutron number squared in the target nucleus, an advantageous feature in view of the small probability of interaction via all other channels in this energy region. A coherent neutrino detector would open the door to many new applications, ranging from the study of fundamental neutrino properties to true "neutrino technology." Unfortunately, present-day radiation detectors of sufficiently large mass (>1 kg) are not sensitive to sub keV nuclear recoils like those expected from this channel. The advent of micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs), new technologies originally intended for use in high energy physics, may soon put an end to this impasse. We present first tests of MPGDs fabricated with radioclean materials and discuss the approach to assessing their sensitivity to these faint signals. Applications are reviewed, in particular their use as a safeguard against illegitimate operation of nuclear reactors. A first industrial mass production of gas electron multipliers (GEMs) is succinctly described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Measurement of GEM parameters with X-rays

    Page(s): 1297 - 1302
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (449 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The gas electron multiplier (GEM)-based detectors have been widely developed in past years and have been proposed for many different applications. In this paper, we report on a method able to provide information on the characteristic parameters of a GEM. A single-GEM detector is illuminated with a high-intensity flux of low energy (5.9 keV) photons and all the electrode currents are measured simultaneously. From the analysis of these measurements we extracted a phenomenological and analytical model able to describe the currents induced on the electrodes as a function of electric fields and GEM voltages when the detector is exposed to a continuous ionizing radiation. This model provides information on the characteristic GEM parameters. In conclusion we briefly describe other methods able to extract in a more direct way GEM parameters. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Pulse shape simulation and analysis of segmented Ge detectors for position extraction

    Page(s): 1309 - 1316
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A simulation method, which can predict the relation between the pulse shapes and the interaction points of incident γ-rays, has been established for the entire effective volume of a segmented Ge detector with planar geometry, and the pulse shapes shows good agreement with the experimental observation. We are using pulse shape analysis to gain position information with a granularity finer than the segment size, and we will discuss the expected position resolution based on the simulation results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Modeling of an integrated active feedback preamplifier in a 0.25 μm CMOS technology at cryogenic temperatures

    Page(s): 1290 - 1296
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (885 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the modeling of a standard 0.25μm CMOS technology at cryogenic temperatures. In the first step of the work, the parameters of the EKV v2.6 model were extracted at different temperatures (300, 150, and 70 K). The extracted parameters were then used to optimize the performance of a room temperature designed active feedback front-end preamplifier (AFP) at 130 K. The results show that with a small adjustment of the extracted parameters it is possible to have a reasonable model at low temperatures. By optimizing the bias conditions at 130 K, a fall time down to 1.5 ns and a double pulse resolution of 6.5 ns were measured for NA60 proton beamscope. The proposed approach will also allow a low temperature design optimization for future projects, which will not be possible using only standard models provided by the foundry. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A new light readout system for the LXeGRIT time projection chamber

    Page(s): 1303 - 1308
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (952 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    LXeGRIT is a liquid xenon time projection chamber (LXeTPC) used as balloon-borne Compton telescope for imaging cosmic sources in the MeV energy band. The three-dimensional position sensitive charge readout is triggered by the xenon scintillation light. In the original chamber design, the light is detected by four UV sensitive, 2'' PMT's (EMI 9813), coupled to the liquid xenon vessel by quartz windows. In order to improve the trigger efficiency and uniformity, a new light readout system has been studied. It consists of 12 UV sensitive, compact 2'' PMT's (Hamamatsu R6041Q), mounted in Teflon frames which cover the four sides of the LXeTPC active volume. These all-metal PMT's were especially developed to work at liquid xenon temperature and up to 3.5 atm overpressure. Light simulations promise an increase in light collection efficiency by more than a factor of ten for the new readout. We present simulations of the light collection efficiency and initial results from the successful operation of the new PMT fully immersed in liquid xenon. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science focuses on all aspects of the theory and applications of nuclear science and engineering, including instrumentation for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation; particle accelerators and their controls; nuclear medicine and its application; effects of radiation on materials, components, and systems; reactor instrumentation and controls; and measurement of radiation in space.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Paul Dressendorfer
11509 Paseo del Oso NE
Albuquerque, NM  87111  USA