IEEE Spectrum

Issue 9 • Sept. 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Big blackout surprises politicians, but not the power community

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s): 9
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (197 KB) | HTML iconHTML

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  • Precision navigation in European skies

    Publication Year: 2003
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    A global system of air traffic control based entirely on global positioning systems, an inevitable idea that has been inching toward realization for more than a decade, came closer on 6 June, with the first transmission of test signals from the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (Egnos). The point of Egnos is to provide error correction to geopositioning signals, relying on dedicate... View full abstract»

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  • Watching the nanotube

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):28 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3733 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Tiny cylinders of carbon-nanotubes-could give liquid crystal and plasma a run for their money in the bid to be the large flat-screen display technology of the future. This paper discusses the operating principles of nanotube displays and their advantages compared to other types of display. View full abstract»

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  • Is "industrial research" an oxymoron? [Reflections]

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s): 56
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Invention on demand

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):46 - 48
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (285 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    A Fab Four partnership brainstorms boisterously to spice up new but mundane products. A. Ze'ev Hed, Richard Pavelle, Sol Aisenberg, and George Freedman meet once a week to thrash out ideas for new products that are leading to many patents and hefty sales. They have to their names more than 300 products, 130 issued and pending patents, and more than 50 licensing arrangements for such gizmos as the ... View full abstract»

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  • US phone companies set stage for fiber to the curb

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):14 - 15
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    From almost the dawn of the Internet, phone and cable companies have been fighting for the hearts and minds of the savvier consumers all over the world. The key battleground is the so-called last-mile link to the home or business, where the phone companies have been pitting their digital subscriber lines (DSLs) against the cable providers' cable modems. In most places in the world, DSLs have been ... View full abstract»

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  • IT takes a village

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):40 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2776 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Laotian farmers, without power or phone service, may soon get connected to the Internet, thanks to an international team of tech-savvy volunteers. The volunteer engineers have designed and built a bicycle-powered PC in a village that will send signals, via an IEEE 802.11b connection, to a solar-powered mountain-top relay station. The signal is then bounced to a server in the nearest town with a ph... View full abstract»

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  • Harnessing tidal energy takes new turn

    Publication Year: 2003
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    With the idea of underwater windmills in mind, Peter Fraenkel, a mechanical engineer, assembled investors in 1999 to launch the Seaflow project and formed the company Marine Current Turbines Ltd. (MCT, Basingstoke, England). The mission of Seaflow was to build a commercial tidal energy plant based on the windmill concept. Backing came from the British government, the European Commission, and eight... View full abstract»

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  • A little light magic [optical lithography]

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):34 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (12)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1216 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    At first glance, it appears that optical lithography has hit a dead end. Wavelengths shorter than 193 nm can't be used without a drastic redesign of lithographic systems because the shorter wavelengths are simply absorbed by the quartz lenses that direct the light onto the wafer. So is this the end? Not quite. There are a few more tricks that IC manufacturers can play. Lumped together, they are ca... View full abstract»

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  • The wireless last mile

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):18 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1088 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Phone companies losing broadband ground may have to embrace their enemy, wireless metropolitan-area networking itself about to take off now that a new standard, IEEE 802.16, has been adopted. Creating a wireless network is relatively simple. At its heart is a base station, which can be put on top of a building's roof, a cellular tower, or even a water tower. The base station is the bridge between ... View full abstract»

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  • Stuff you don't learn in engineering school

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):49 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (268 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    New engineers often leave school with technical know-how but without workplace savvy. Many if not most young engineers emerge from school with fabulous technical talent but little ability in the "soft" skills or even the realization of how important such skills are. They include making decisions, setting priorities, working in teams, running meetings, and negotiating. When students eventually hit ... View full abstract»

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  • Wideband: multimedia unplugged

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):23 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (51)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2018 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Promising to eliminate just about all of a home's signal cables, ultrawideband very-low-power wireless technology, when finally standardized, will be a carrier-based system most likely incorporating frequency hopping and orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM). Its purpose: to replace almost every data cable in the home, even the ones going in and out of the television set, a job that re... View full abstract»

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  • Brazil tests world's largest environmental monitoring system

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):10 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (551 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    An elaborate environmental monitoring system paid for by Brazil, Sivam was built by the US defense electronics contractor Raytheon Co. (Lexington, Mass.) and two Brazilian outfits, Embraer (Sao Jose dos Campos) and Atech (Sao Paulo)-the former an aeronautics company that has supplied planes for Sivam, the latter the Brazilian system integrator. The US $1.4 billion system pulls together information... View full abstract»

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