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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 7 • Date July 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Cockpit Instruments [A century of powered flight:1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 13 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (561 KB)  

    Since nearly the beginning airplanes were flown using only the stick or control column, rudder pedals, dials, and switches. There were as many control arrangements (sticks, wheels, and levers) as there were pioneer airmen. The 1903 Wright Flyer was far from conventional in many ways. Their only instruments were a stopwatch and prop revolution counter. Instruments were of little interest for about a decade after the Wright Brother's flight. Just getting off and back onto the ground safely was the primary concern. Controls have evolved, but not changed as much as instrument displays. The stick/control column is beginning to be replaced by hand controllers in some fly-by-wire (FBW) aircraft (e.g., Airbus A-320 and up). Servo feedback provides the necessary hand controller "feel" as a function of the aerodynamic pressure expected on the control surface. View full abstract»

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  • Aviation Radio [A century of powered flight 1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 19 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (819 KB)  

    The following topics are dealt with: electron tubes; World War I efforts; post WWI radio advances; airmail; antenna developments; weather; and WWII and after. View full abstract»

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  • Stability and control [A century of powered flight 1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 37 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (594 KB)  

    Aircraft stability and control has evolved from stick and rudder through stability augmentation to redundant digital flight control systems (FCS) and finally to digital fly-by-wire (FBW). Substantial advances in avionics have occurred as aviation progressed from biplanes to civil transports to sub/supersonic military craft and finally the Space Shuttle. Aircraft stability can be defined as aircraft control by maintaining a favorable relationship between center of gravity (CG) and the center of pressure (CP). View full abstract»

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  • Electronic warfare. [A century of powered flight: 1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 49 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (611 KB)  

    Electronic warfare (EW) is a term that includes a number of different electronic technologies for intelligence gathering and/or interfering with enemy operations. Electronic intelligence (ELINT), or eavesdropping, has been going on since the invention of the telephone and telegraph. Electronic countermeasures (ECM) deprive an enemy of the electronic spectrum by creating interference (jamming) that obscures their information or generates false information (spoofing). Electronic counter countermeasures (ECCM) is an effort designed to mitigate and overcome enemy ECM operations. ECM objectives include: search for signals in frequency, azimuth, and elevation; detect and identify radar signals via characteristics; and establish signal importance; commence appropriate countermeasures. It is only recently that these technologies have traditionally been categorized as EW, and are also referred to as electronic combat (EC). This section will focus on EW as it relates only to aviation. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction [A century of powered flight:1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 5 - 12
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    The term Avionics is used loosely to identify that electronic equipment necessary to fly an aircraft. The term is nearly 50 years old with origins in military electronics. With the increasing dependence of aviation on electronics the amount of equipment that falls into this category has skyrocketed. This issue is intended to commemorate the Wright Brothers' Centennial of Powered Flight. It emphasizes aviation-related electrical/electronic advances for the years 1903 to 1953. The following paragraphs highlight some of the major topics discussed in this special issue. View full abstract»

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  • Navigation and landing [A century of powered flight 1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 27 - 36
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (854 KB)  

    Navigation and landing for the first half century of aviation fundamentally relied on radio-based electronic aids. The military began serious investigation of radio navigation during World War I. Up until WW II map reading, dead reckoning, and various means of radio direction finding were the primary methods of determining aircraft position. Since WWII a number of other navigation techniques, such as Doppler radar, radio inertial, pure inertial, aided inertial, and today's integrated GPS inertial, have been developed. Most of the inertial systems evolved from the military ICBM and subsequent space programs. View full abstract»

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  • Airborne radar. [A century of powered flight: 1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 43 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)  

    Radar is one of the major AESS disciplines and has been a major focus of papers and articles. This issue focuses on aviation and emphasizes the evolution of airborne radar systems through WW II. View full abstract»

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  • UAVs: the future. [A century of powered flight: 1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 61 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB)  

    Unmanned air vehicles (UAV) are assuming a prominent role in aviation and the future may have already arrived. Most of us have heard of the Global Hawk and Predator UAVs, which have been collecting real-time battlefield data without risking loss of life. However, the most amazing performance and avionics can be found in airplane-model-size MiniUAVs and insect-like MicroUAVs still on the drawing board. Meanwhile the all-electric NASA Helios "tower in the sky" is moving ever closer to reality. View full abstract»

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  • Electric power. [A century of powered flight: 1903-2003]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 55 - 60
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    The following topics are dealt with: magnetos; batteries; starting and powering electric loads; WW II aircraft; distributed power; and tomorrow's airplanes. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
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