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Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 6  Part 2 • Date June 2003

 This issue contains several parts.Go to:  Part 1 

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Estimation of rock glacier surface deformation using SAR interferometry data

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 1512 - 1515
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (677 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The detection and quantification of surface deformation of an active rock glacier using the differential synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (D-InSAR) technique is presented. An average deformation rate of -6 mm/35 days in the radar line of ight was estimated for the summer of 1992. The maximum deformation rate, -18 mm/35 days, was identified at the upper part of the rock glacier, whereas the deformation rate at the snout of the rock glacier was about -10 mm/35 days. The spatial distribution of the surface deformation in the D-InSAR displacement map is smooth and supports the idea that ice is the stress-transferring medium in rock glaciers. View full abstract»

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  • Airborne differential SAR interferometry: first results at L-band

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 1516 - 1520
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (675 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In recent years, differential interferometry using spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors has become an established technique for detecting and monitoring centimetre-scale deformations of the Earth's surface, as well as glacier flows and landslides. Although often very efficient, the use of spaceborne SAR data has several drawbacks, namely phase artifacts caused by atmospheric effects and very low coherence due to long data acquisition intervals and the short radar wavelength of the sensor. Most important, current spaceborne sensors are not able to ensure flexible monitoring of critical regions. Airborne sensors may overcome most of the problems mentioned above, but up to now, the operational use of airborne differential SAR interferometry has been prevented by insufficiently accurate motion compensation of the platform. In this letter, first results of airborne differential interferometry using the German Aerospace Center (DLR) experimental SAR system (E-SAR) in the interferometric repeat-pass mode are addressed. This includes an analysis of long-term decorrelation behavior in L-band and, particularly, the correction of residual motion errors in heavily decorrelated interferograms. A first differential interferogram of agricultural and forested areas is presented and analyzed. View full abstract»

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  • Estimation of azimuth phase undulations with multisquint processing in airborne interferometric SAR images

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 1530 - 1533
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Presents a technique to detect and correct phase errors appearing in interferometric airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems due to the lack of precision in the navigation system. The technique is based on a multisquint processing approach, i.e. by processing the same image pairs with different squint angles we can combine the information of different interferograms to obtain the desired phase correction. Airborne single-pass interferometric data from the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) experimental airborne SAR is used to validate the method. View full abstract»

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  • A comparative study for orthogonal subspace projection and constrained energy minimization

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 1525 - 1529
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (768 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We conduct a comparative study and investigate the relationship between two well-known techniques in hyperspectral image detection and classification: orthogonal subspace projection (OSP) and constrained energy minimization. It is shown that they are closely related and essentially equivalent provided that the noise is white with large SNR. Based on this relationship, the performance of OSP can be improved via data-whitening and noise-whitening processes. View full abstract»

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  • The application of wavelets correlator for ship wake detection in SAR images

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 1506 - 1511
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (867 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The detection of the wake can provide substantial information about a ship, such as its size, direction, and speed of movement. In general though, ship-generated wakes in synthetic aperture radar images are associated with high sea clutter, which will cause some deterioration in the detection performance. Therefore, a wavelet correlator, based on an orthogonal basis function, is adopted. Three highpass images - horizontal, vertical, and diagonal direction - are generated for each resolution scale, followed by a process to correlate among the moduli of different scale modulus images formed from the three highpass images. The output of the correlation process is highly representative at the ship's wake edges. Comparisons with other methods indicate the superior performance of the present approach, in that not only can the wakes be detected, but their V-shaped pattern is well preserved. The second stage involves the application of the Radon transform technique to an estimation of the V-opening angle from the detected ship wakes. Ship-generated wake edges are found to be the local maxima in the wavelet transform method of several adjacent scales, and hence, the wake edge will be enhanced in the reconstructed data. The background noise is also greatly reduced. In particular, the process of spatial correlation is found to be critical. Compared to a direct Radon transform, the proposed scheme is demonstrated to be much more effective in terms of efficiency, as well as reliability, for ship wake detection in noisy backgrounds. View full abstract»

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  • A technique for mapping thermal infrared radiation variation within land cover

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 1521 - 1524
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (518 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A technique for mapping the thermal infrared radiation variation within land cover using both a classification map and a thermal infrared image is proposed. Furthermore, a technique to effectively calculate the average thermal radiance for each land cover from Thematic Mapper (TM)-type sensors, which acquire high resolution of visible and near-infrared images and low resolution of thermal infrared images, was also proposed. These techniques provide useful information on processing TM-type sensors for urban heat monitoring, vegetation diagnosis monitoring, forest fire monitoring, and so forth. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

 

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING (TGRS) is a monthly publication that focuses on the theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as applied to sensing the land, oceans, atmosphere, and space; and the processing, interpretation, and dissemination of this information.

 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Antonio J. Plaza
University of Extremadura