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Spectrum, IEEE

Issue 7 • Date July 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Concurrent engineering: new rules for world-class companies

    Page(s): 22 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (795 KB)  

    The use of concurrent engineering (CE) techniques for developing and manufacturing high-quality products by companies that compete successfully around the world is examined. CE starts with multifunctional teaming, but it also includes concepts and techniques such as design for manufacture (DFM), continuous process improvement (CPI), total quality management (TQM), and quality function deployment (QFD). With CE, product development involves all parts of an organization. The benefits of CE-shorter time for product introduction, improved design quality, reduced design iterations, and shorter production time-are outlined. Advice for forming an interfunctional or interdisciplinary team is offered, and the use of structured analysis is briefly examined.<> View full abstract»

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  • Concurrent engineering: The DARPA initiative: encouraging new industrial practices

    Page(s): 26 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (536 KB)  

    The DARPA Initiative in Concurrent Engineering (DICE), is a program launched in 1988 by the US Dept. of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to encourage the practice of concurrent engineering in the US military and industrial base. The overall goal is to develop an architecture for concurrent engineering in which the people working on a project can instantly communicate with each other and access, share, and store up-to-date information in a transient way, unhindered by geographic separation, organizational structure, product complexity, or incompatible tools, databases, and computing resources. The concurrent engineering services are being developed in conjunction with several pilot projects. All the project members belong to 'tiger teams', interdisciplinary groups that rove across traditional department boundaries, communicating their insights, making recommendations, and negotiating conflicts.<> View full abstract»

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  • Concurrent engineering: making it work calls for input from everyone

    Page(s): 30 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (507 KB)  

    The elements necessary to the successful application of concurrent engineering (CE) are examined. Implementing CE takes commitment by the entire organization, from top to bottom. It takes education at all levels so that everyone speaks a common language. It takes repetition: managers and engineers must constantly impress upon their peers, and those above and below them, their commitment to CE. The CE organization must integrate the expertise from all the functions with the product design phase. The members of the team should be located near each other to encourage ongoing communications. It helps to provide workspaces for everyone connected with the team, even for people in ancillary disciplines who spend only part of their time on the project. Alternatively, or sometimes in addition, the product development team may accompany the product as it moves through its design and development phases. This will teach all team members the consequences of their earlier decisions. Getting closer to both customers and suppliers during the development process is also important.<> View full abstract»

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  • Concurrent engineering: success stories in instrumentation, communications

    Page(s): 32 - 37
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    Four case histories of the successful use of concurrent engineering (CE) to develop instrumentation and communications products are presented. They are the development of an oscilloscope at Hewlett-Packard, the development of internetworking products by Cisco Systems, large-scale systems development at Raytheon, and making one-of-a-kind products at ITEK optical systems.<> View full abstract»

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  • Selecting math coprocessors

    Page(s): 38 - 41
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    The selection of math coprocessors for the Intel 80386 View full abstract»

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