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IEE Review

Issue 5 • Date May 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Phones and health - the science

    Page(s): 16 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (422 KB)  

    Analogue mobile phones have now been linked to brain cancer. The author looks at the current research on the phones in use. In the late 1970s a Californian research group found changes in calcium in chick brain cells exposed to analogue mobile signals but subsequent attempts to replicate the results have been inconsistent. Results from detailed work, coupled with large health studies like the EC-funded Interphone project on the occurrence of brain tumours in 30-59 year olds in 13 countries, may help to clarify things over the years. View full abstract»

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  • Silicon valley north

    Page(s): 22 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (727 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Foreign parts [electronic body implants]

    Page(s): 30 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (618 KB)  

    Feeling threatened by cyborgs? Don't believe the hype. Researchers at the University of Southern California have simply attached some electrodes to slices of dead rat brain and are wiring them up to an external chip to see what happens. The University of Southern California team hopes that its brain implant will eventually help patients brain-damaged from stroke, epilepsy or Alzheimer's disease. But such systems may not deliver anything remotely practical for years - if ever. Retina implants that allow 'the blind to see' are another particular favourite with the press. Over the last ten years, a couple of these stories have come out A of research pioneered originally at the Johns Hopkins Eye Institute in the US. The implanted blind people have temporarily been able see points of light, shapes, and contrasts between light and dark, as long as they were encumbered with terrifying-looking Heath Robinson contraptions of gadgetry clamped to their heads. This stuff is very worthy but what we read about it can be quite misleading. View full abstract»

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  • Lifting the toll barrier

    Page(s): 48 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (545 KB)  

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  • The new micro giant [semiconductor industry, role of China]

    Page(s): 18 - 19
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    China is gearing up to emerge as a powerful player in the world semiconductor industry when the downturn ends. The author examines the implications for the rest of the world's semiconductor industry. View full abstract»

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  • Less is more [intelligent speed adaptation for road vehicles]

    Page(s): 40 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (664 KB)  

    The use of sophisticated in-car technology to enforce urban speed limits and improve road safety is an idea whose time could well have come. To the great majority of motorists, speed bumps are, at best, a 'necessary evil'. However, if the results of recent trials in Sweden involving intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) technology are anything to go by then the days of this contentious feature of our urban roads could well be numbered. Between 1999 and 2002 government funding of SEK75m (#5.64m) was provided to install ISA systems in 5000 test vehicles distributed amongst four Swedish municipalities (Borlange, Lidkoping, Lund and Umea), and the results of these trials have apparently greatly exceeded the expectations of even ISA technology's keenest proponents within the Swedish National Road Administration (SNRA). ISA systems are, a combination of several existing technologies being put together in a new way. Many cars at the expensive end of the market are now being provided with satellite navigation systems as standard, where each vehicle is fitted with a Global Positioning System (GPS) transmitter/receiver, so that the precise position of the vehicle can be determined, and a GSM mobile phone link, so that this position can be integrated with a detailed and accurate digital roadmap maintained by the satellite navigation service provider. ISA technology, simply put, merely adds data on speed limits to the digital road map, so that each vehicle 'knows' what the maximum legal speed is on any road that it happens to be travelling along. View full abstract»

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