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IEEE Security & Privacy

Issue 3 • May-June 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Questions about strategy to secure cyberspace

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):8 - 11
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  • Spyware: Menace, nuisance, or both?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):10 - 11
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  • Computer security: Art and science [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s): 14
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Hey, robot!

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):51 - 55
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The case for software warranties

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):80 - 82
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  • Society cannot function without privacy

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):84 - 86
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (1)
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  • Guilty until proven innocent?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):88 - 87
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  • Poisoning the software supply chain

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):70 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (492 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    To the indiscriminate and opportunistic attacker, breaking into a software package's development and distribution site and waiting until unsuspecting users install it is more efficient than locating and hacking into users' systems individually. Starting in 2002 and continuing in to 2003, we've seen new emphasis on this type of attack. All the recent activity has showcased the trend that attacks ag... View full abstract»

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  • Slow dancing [security issues]

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):67 - 68
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (185 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Lately, the tectonic forces that move large governmental and private organizations seem to be carrying them in the same direction on security and privacy issues. However, given the overall complexity, the difficulty in finding common ground among stakeholders, and the case with which economic and political priorities can overshadow small progress in achieving security and privacy awareness (let al... View full abstract»

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  • The good, the bad, and the ugly: what might change if we had good DRM

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):63 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1206 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Various vendors claim to have solved the online piracy problem in manners that can enable the safe sale of information to Web users. The technologies they sell include watermarking, hardware key "dongles", encryption and monitoring. The major place people worry about digital rights management's (DRM) impact is with existing Web sites that provide free information. Whatever benefits it might bring,... View full abstract»

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  • Understanding trusted computing: will its benefits outweigh its drawbacks?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):60 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (238 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The Trusted Computing Platform Architecture (TCPA) and the Microsoft's Palladium have similar (though not identical) architectures and similar goals. Both systems are part of a more general approach called trusted computing (TC). In this article the author introduces TC's basic concepts and discusses their implications. However, the individual proposals are still in flux and some kind of convergen... View full abstract»

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  • Toward reliable user authentication through biometrics

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):45 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (30)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Biometric authentication systems identify users by their measurable human characteristics. Although biometrics promise greater system security because identifying characteristics are tied to specific users, many issues remain unresolved. View full abstract»

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  • Humans in the loop: human-computer interaction and security

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):75 - 79
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (215 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The security field suffers from an endemic problem: despite our best efforts, the current infrastructure is continually full of security vulnerabilities. The systems that comprise this infrastructure also are full of boundaries and interfaces where humans and systems must interact: most secure systems exist to serve human users and carry out human-oriented processes, and are designed and built by ... View full abstract»

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  • Who watches the security educators?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):56 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (386 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Security knowledge in all fields has historically been a double-edged sword. The information that makes it possible to protect a system, an activity, or a person, is also the information that can be used to harm that system, chat activity, that person. How knowledge is used, and the opinions of who ever is judging that use, makes the difference. The debate regarding appropriate teaching philosophi... View full abstract»

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  • Masks: bringing anonymity and personalization together

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):18 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (11)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (651 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Unlike most privacy tools, the Masks framework gives Web sites general information to personalize services without compromising the user's anonymity. View full abstract»

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  • IP traceback: a new denial-of-service deterrent?

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):24 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (35)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (502 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The increasing frequency of malicious computer attacks on government agencies and Internet businesses has caused severe economic waste and unique social threats. IP traceback-the ability to trace IP packets to their origins-is a significant step toward identifying, and thus stopping, attackers. View full abstract»

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  • Hide and seek: an introduction to steganography

    Publication Year: 2003, Page(s):32 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (329)  |  Patents (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (655 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Although people have hidden secrets in plain sight-now called steganography-throughout the ages, the recent growth in computational power and technology has propelled it to the forefront of today's security techniques. Essentially, the information-hiding process in a steganographic system starts by identifying a cover medium's redundant bits (those that can be modified without destroying that medi... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Security & Privacy’s primary objective is to stimulate and track advances in security, privacy, and dependability and present these advances in a form that can be useful to a broad cross-section of the professional community—ranging from academic researchers to industry practitioners. It provides articles with both a practical and research bent by the top thinkers in the field of security and privacy, along with case studies, surveys, tutorials, columns, and in-depth interviews and podcasts for the information security industry.
 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ahmad-Reza Sadeghi
Technische Universität Darmstadt
ahmad.sadeghi@trust.tu-darmstadt.de