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IEE Review

Issue 4 • Date April 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Serving the public

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 49 - 52
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  • Smart house prices fall

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 22 - 23
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  • The rising of a new order: genetically engineered biomolecules may be the way forward in nanoscale chip manufacture

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 42 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Logic elements of just a few atoms across promise exotic new concepts like quantum computing but how to integrate these tiny structures into devices in the first place is the key question. One answer is to harness biological molecules' innate ability to form into regular lattices. Semiconductor building blocks on the nanoscale could be chemically glued to specially engineered proteins or DNA strands, which would self-assemble into ordered arrays. This is the advantage of the biomolecule approach,it is a 'bottom up' process: all of the components are mixed together and then a certain trigger or cocktail of chemicals is added that causes them to spontaneously assemble. View full abstract»

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  • If it's mobile, one size doesn't fit all

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 29
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  • Stalemate!

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 20 - 21
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  • Nano revolution

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 46 - 48
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    All over the world, interdisciplinary teams are uncovering new engineering truths to support the statement made in 1959 by US physicist Richard Feynman that "the principles of physics do not speak against the possibility of manoeuvring things atom by atom". Nanotechnology is based on the ability to create and manipulate materials, devices and systems at the nanometre scale; that is, one billionth of a metre (10-9). Another definition comes from considering nature's art of 'building up', by self-assembling atoms and molecules into useful structures. This proves particularly useful in the field of semiconductors, where designers are running out of things they can do with traditional lithographic techniques. Typically, semiconductor devices are grown from silicon on top of which various materials are deposited and then etched away until the needed circuit remains. But photolithography is reaching its physical limits, since etching features smaller than the wavelength of light becomes increasingly challenging. Hence the interest in building up, instead of etching down. View full abstract»

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  • Poised to pounce [semiconductor industry]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 26 - 28
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    This article briefly discusses the new applications for the semiconductor supplier Actel. After a last great fourth quarter in 2000, Actel, like every other semiconductor supplier today is just bouncing along the bottom. However, Actel's president John East believes the good times will come again, driven by the emergence of yet another "killer" application. East is encouraged by the possibilities of wireless connectivity between handheld appliances. A relatively small boom, perhaps spread across a number of related technologies, would suit a programmable logic supplier like Actel nicely. The article discusses the problems with ASICs for such applications and how they might be overcome. View full abstract»

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  • Art of the butterflies [nanostructures]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 36 - 40
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    Unusually, for a relatively new scientific discipline, Britain is in the forefront of efforts to create commercial products from nanotechnology research. There are now half a dozen British firms active in this nanomaterials sector, the attraction being its potential to impact so many areas of industry. One especially strong candidate for early commercialisation is nanopowder but other contenders are coming up fast. NanoCo Technologies, spun out of Manchester University's Materials Science Centre in December 2001, is aiming to exploit a novel method of producing quantum dots. Two aspects of nanotechnology are of overriding importance. First, research is wholly multidisciplinary in nature, and second, research breakthroughs by small teams could be applied very quickly to real-world products. With these thoughts in mind, the British government is funding a series of university-based research initiatives around the UK. Interdisciplinary Research Centres (IRCs) have been established at Cambridge and Oxford, and nanoscience research hubs. are springing up in London, Birmingham and Swansea. Some of the topics being researched include: membrane proteins; carbon nanotubes; bio-nanotechnology. View full abstract»

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  • Weapon of choice

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 34
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  • Microsoft and the mobile [phone]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 18 - 19
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    The author questions wether mobile phones avoid the fate of the PC or is 'Microsoft-isation' inevitable. Microsoft has handful of mobile phones on the market built around its Smartphone 2002 operating system (OS) including O2's XDA and Orange's SPV (both built by Taiwanese firm HTC), and it hopes to increase its presence through further handset deals. A smartphone is a cross between a PDA and mobile phone that you can use to connect to the Web, check e-mails, organise your appointments, link to your PC, edit spreadsheets and word-processor files, and download new applications and services. View full abstract»

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