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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date May 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Loss of Adam Lender, one of our pioneers

    Page(s): 16
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  • Engineering internet QoS [Book Review]

    Page(s): 18
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    Freely Available from IEEE
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  • Topics in internet technology

    Page(s): 120
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  • Coding and modulation for a horrible channel

    Page(s): 92 - 98
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    Designing a system able to cope with a hostile channel is a typical challenge for data communication engineers. High-data-rate communication over power lines is an exemplar case: while power lines are a potentially convenient and inexpensive "no new wire" medium for data transmission, their features make it very difficult to design a simple modem. In this article we illustrate the main features of the power line communication channel, and some of the solutions advocated for modem design. View full abstract»

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  • Light core and intelligent edge for a flexible, thin-layered, and cost-effective optical transport network

    Page(s): S30 - S36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (601 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a new optics-based transport architecture that emulates fast switching in the network core via emerging fast tunable lasers at the network edge, and bypasses the need for fast optical switching and buffering. The new architecture is capable of handling both asynchronous and synchronous traffic, for dealing with various bandwidth granularities and responding to dynamic changes in end-to-end traffic demands. The architecture also reduces the amount of layering in the transport network by eliminating packet and TDM switching, keeps the network core light (lightweight and transparent), and pushes intelligence to the network edge. We discuss technical challenges that arise in the new architecture and describe possible approaches to address them. View full abstract»

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  • Advanced signal processing for power line communications

    Page(s): 100 - 107
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (670 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article, signal processing techniques to combat the adverse communications environment on power lines are addressed, so as to enable reliable high speed data communications over low-voltage power distribution networks for Internet access and in-home/office networking. It is seen that multicarrier code-division multiple access, multiuser detection, and turbo decoding, having demonstrated their limit-approaching capacity in DSL and wireless communication systems, are readily applied to power line communications. In particular, it is argued that these methods can successfully mitigate the influence of the principal impairments in PLC channels: time-varying channel attenuation, multipath frequency-selective fading, multiple access interference, and background noise. Strategies to deal with the most unfavorable noise source, the impulse noise, are also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic RSVP protocol

    Page(s): 130 - 135
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (426 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    RSVP is a resource reservation setup protocol that can be used by a host to request specific QoS for multicast multimedia flows on the Internet. Multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) architecture also needs RSVP. The fact that the resolutions of the display system used in different receiver nodes might have different, multi-resolution characteristics is supported in the MPEG-4 standard, and the EZW compression algorithm can cease decoding at any point in the bitstream. However, RSVP does not provide a more flexible mechanism. In this article we propose an extension of RSVP to provide the needed mechanism, coined dynamic RSVP (DRSVP), to dynamically adjust reserved resources on nodes without much effort. It provides different video resolutions to different receiver nodes with different needed reserved resources. Therefore, it does not waste precious Internet resources to transmit unnecessary multimedia packets. View full abstract»

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  • Demonstration of the technical viability of PLC systems on medium- and low-voltage lines in the United States

    Page(s): 108 - 112
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    Several companies in the United States are interested in applying power line communications for broadband Internet access. This article provides an in-depth report of one specific end-to-end PLC trial carried out in the United States. This article includes useful information on the various devices utilized to construct the network, the applications demonstrated, and the performance characteristics of the particular field trial selected as emblematic. Insight into the main components and challenges involved in the testing activity is also given. View full abstract»

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  • Advances in integrated 2D MEMS-based solutions for optical network applications

    Page(s): S16 - S23
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    Reduction of installation and operational costs are currently the driving force behind the implementation of optical networks. 2D MEMS technology plays an important role in the development of these network systems with several applications, including optical cross-connects, protection switching, optical add-drop multiplexing and wavelength switching. The optical design and packaging technology that has been developed for 2D MEMS has resulted in a flexible platform that can be used to manufacture highly integrated fiber optic devices. View full abstract»

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  • All-optical address recognition for optically-assisted routing in next-generation optical networks

    Page(s): S38 - S44
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    Optical fiber communication technology enabled high-speed, long-distance capacity in today's networks. The packet switching functions such as address recognition and routing are performed in the electrical domain after optical-to-electrical conversion. As more real-time applications come online, demand for bandwidth increases, and electronic processing may potentially become a bottleneck at the intermediate nodes along the network. We introduce some optical address recognition schemes for optically-assisted routing that may decrease the processing delay at these nodes. View full abstract»

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  • Broadband PLC access systems and field deployment in European power line networks

    Page(s): 114 - 118
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    Data communications over low voltage power distribution networks provide an alternative and cost-effective last mile access technology. It offers data and voice services to users in residential and business areas. Currently, many field trials with different broadband power line communications systems are running worldwide. This article describes one of these systems for the last mile application in European power line networks. It addresses major field deployment aspects, such as range, coverage, coupling, and intercell interference. View full abstract»

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  • Protection approaches for dynamic traffic in IP/MPLS-over-WDM networks

    Page(s): S24 - S29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (556 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Due to the explosive growth of data-related traffic driven by the Internet, network reliability becomes an important issue. We investigate various protection approaches to handle failures for dynamic traffic demands in IP/MPLS-over-WDM networks. An LSP can be protected at either the IP/MPLS layer or the optical layer. In IP/MPLS layer protection, an LSP is protected by providing a link-disjoint backup LSP between its end nodes. In optical layer protection, an LSP is protected by the backup lightpath of each lightpath traversed by the LSP. We present two integrated routing algorithms: hop-based integrated routing algorithm and bandwidth-based integrated routing algorithm (BIRA) to set up the restorable bandwidth-guaranteed paths efficiently. Then we present a multilayer protection scheme for multiclass traffic in such networks. This scheme takes into account the different QoS and recovery requirements of the traffic to provide protection capability either at the MPLS layer or at the optical layer in a cost-effective manner. We use the connection blocking probability and number of optical-electrical-optical conversions as performance metrics to compare various protection approaches. View full abstract»

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  • Interdomain traffic engineering with BGP

    Page(s): 122 - 128
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (600 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Traffic engineering is performed by means of a set of techniques that can be used to better control the flow of packets inside an IP network. We discuss the utilization of these techniques across interdomain boundaries in the global Internet. We first analyze the characteristics of interdomain traffic on the basis of measurements from three different Internet service providers and show that a small number of sources are responsible for a large fraction of the traffic. Across interdomain boundaries, traffic engineering relies on a careful tuning of the route advertisements sent via the border gateway protocol. We explain how this tuning can be used to control the flow of incoming and outgoing traffic, and identify its limitations. View full abstract»

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  • Physical and regulatory constraints for communication over the power supply grid

    Page(s): 84 - 90
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    This article describes the topology of the power supply network in respect to the deployment of power line communications in different countries. The characteristics of the power line channel are investigated, and the causes of electromagnetic interference from PLC technology in wireless communications services are discussed. Since the radiation originating from PLC cannot be avoided completely by technical means, a solution via standardization is necessary. The current status of worldwide regulation concerning EMC is presented. View full abstract»

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  • Tandem-free VoIP conferencing: a bridge to next-generation networks

    Page(s): 136 - 145
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (652 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article surveys approaches to teleconferencing in voice over IP networks. The considerations for conferencing include perceived quality, scalability, control, and compatibility. Architectures used for conferencing range from centralized bridges to full mesh. Centralized conference bridges used with compressed speech degrade speech quality when multiple talkers are mixed and subjected to tandem coding operations. Full mesh and multicast solutions (mixing at the end-points) are inappropriate when the number of conferees is large. This article discusses a hybrid solution that incorporates tandem-free bridging (the bridge selects and forwards packets) and endpoint mixing. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sean Moore
Centripetal Networks