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Control Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1988

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Design of tactile sensing systems for dextrous manipulators

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 3 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1210 KB)  

    Preliminary work aimed at understanding the general issues and tradeoffs governing the design of extended tactile sensing systems is reviewed. General methods for estimating the bandwidths of line-addressed and matrix-addressed systems are presented. The proposed tactile sensing system incorporates four subsystems that permit the high-speed access of tactile data: (1) a transduction scheme; (2) a preprocessing scheme; (3) a multiplexing and transmission subsystem; and (4) tactile data selection techniques. Designs for implementation at each of these levels are presented. The designs emphasize practical necessities such as simplicity, reliability, and economy, along with plans to incorporate a tactile system into the Utah/MIT dextrous hand.<> View full abstract»

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  • Vision-guided robotic fabric manipulation for apparel manufacturing

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 14 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (658 KB)  

    Methods are described for vision-guided robotic control of fabric motion for performing simulated joining operations for apparel manufacturing. The determination of robot motion paths is based on visual information defining the position of the fabric edges in world coordinates. The usefulness of the shape analysis and motion control algorithms is demonstrated by experimentation with an integrated robot and vision fabric-handling system. Results of these tests show that using machine vision for planning robot motion provides an effective solution for implementing automated robotic fabric manipulation.<> View full abstract»

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  • Automated robotic deburring using impedance control

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 21 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (605 KB)  

    An automated deburring procedure using a robot manipulator is considered for the removal of burrs in the presence of robot oscillations and bounded uncertainties in the tool holder. Electronic compliancy (impedance control) is proposed as an adaptive mechanism to satisfy the requirements of this application. The development and implementation of the impedance control methodology on an active end-effector or the whole robot are examined for precision deburring and grinding tasks.<> View full abstract»

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  • Control of an automated machining workstation

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 26 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (539 KB)  

    The software architecture of the vertical machining workstation in the Automated Manufacturing Research Facility (AMRF) at the National Bureau of Standards is presented. This prototype system demonstrates flexible computer-integrated manufacturing for a family of prismatic parts. The workstation software components include: a feature-based design system for defining part geometries, an automatic process planning and numerical-control code generation system, an automatic robot program generator, a state-machine-based hierarchical control system that executes process plans, a diagnostic tools package, and mailbox communications software. The system is capable of running stand-alone, as a single station manufacturing system, or integrated under the AMRF cell controller.<> View full abstract»

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  • Universal six-joint robot controller

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 31 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (686 KB)  

    The authors describe the specifications, design, and implementation of a general-purpose six-axis robotic manipulator controller developed to serve as a research tool for investigating practical and theoretical aspects of control strategies in robotics. The 80286-based Intel System 310 was used for running the XENIX operating servo software as well as higher-level software that implements kinematics and path planning. A multibus-compatible interface board was designed and constructed to handle input/output signals from the joint motors of the robot manipulator. The universal controller is capable of driving robot manipulators equipped with electric joint motors and position optical encoders. To test functionality, the controller was connected to the joint motor DC power amplifier of a Unimate PUMA 560 arm, bypassing completely the manufacturer-supplied Unimation controller; proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control laws were installed into the XENIX operating system. Additional software drivers were implemented to allow application programs access to the interface board. All software was written in the C language.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1990. The current retitled publication is IEEE Control Systems.

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